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8 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Martha Minow. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Martha Minow, often where they are interviewed.

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8 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Martha Minow. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Martha Minow, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

Amanpour: Nima Elbagir, Maria Ressa, Olafur Eliasson and Martha Minow

Amanpour
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In a special report, CNN Senior International Correspondent Nima Elbagir confronts a priest accused of abusing some of the World's most vulnerable children in the Central African Republic. Maria Ressa, the CEO of social news network Rappler, talks about her experience of going toe to toe with the Filipino president Rodrigo Duterte. Olafur Eliasson, the artist famous for his use of the natural elements, joins Christiane Amanpour to discuss how his work helps people connect with the climate crisis. And our Michel Martin sits down with Martha Minow, the former dean of Harvard Law School, to discuss her new book "When Should Law Forgive?" about the complicated intersections between law, justice and forgiveness.

Nov 22 2019

55mins

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Martha Minow, "When Should Law Forgive?"

After Words
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Former Harvard Law School dean Martha Minow examines cases in which the law is forgiving. She's interviewed by Georgetown Law professor and former federal prosecutor Paul Butler.

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Nov 16 2019

1hr 2mins

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40: Conversation with Martha Minow

Joi's Conversations Podcast
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Conversation with Martha Minow, Harvard Law Professor and former Dean of Harvard Law School. We talk about forgiveness, the judicial system and the future of law in a world of new technologies such as AI.

[EP-EN-40]

Sep 07 2017

44mins

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Martha Minow, "Forgiveness, Law and Justice"

The University of Chicago Law School Faculty Podcast
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Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
with comments by Martha Nussbaum, Aziz Huq, and Michael Schill

What role if any should forgiveness play in law and legal systems? By forgiveness, I mean: a conscious, deliberate decision to forgo rightful grounds for whoever has committed a wrong or harm. Law may penalize those who apologize and in so doing make forgiveness by the victim less likely. Law may construct adversarial processes that render forgiveness less likely than it would otherwise be. Or law can give people chances to meet together, in spaces where they may apologize and forgive.

This lecture was presented on January 8, 2015, at the University of Chicago Law School as part of the Brennan Center Jorde Symposium.

Jan 29 2015

1hr 39mins

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Martha Minow, “In Brown’s Wake: Legacies of America’s Educational Landmark” (Oxford UP, 2011)

New Books in American Studies
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What can judges do to change society? Fifty-seven years ago, the Supreme Court resolved to find out: the unanimous ruling they issued in Brown v. Board of Education threw the weight of the Constitution fully behind the aspiration of social equality among the races. The possibilities of law as an engine of social justice seem to be encapsulated in the story of the decision — and in the many decades of resistance to its enforcement.


Today, there are those who argue that the Court failed in its goal, since actual racial mixing in U.S. schools has declined steadily over the last 35 years. But in her new book, In Brown’s Wake: Legacies of America’s Educational Landmark (Oxford UP, 2011), Harvard Law School Dean Martha Minow argues that the legacy of Brown should be viewed in a larger context. Neither a self-executing mandate for racial equality nor a futile rhetorical exercise, the decision was destined to become a lodestar for a wide variety of reformers in all areas of American society — and beyond.


In a series of case studies, Dean Minow’s book reveals how Brown, the milestone in American jurisprudence, took on meanings the judges never envisioned, in the hands of advocates who, in 1954, nobody could have expected. Whatever else it was, the decision was that vital ingredient to be coupled with any kind of action: an idea whose time had come.

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Sep 07 2011

47mins

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Martha Minow, “In Brown’s Wake: Legacies of America’s Educational Landmark” (Oxford UP, 2011)

New Books in History
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What can judges do to change society? Fifty-seven years ago, the Supreme Court resolved to find out: the unanimous ruling they issued in Brown v. Board of Education threw the weight of the Constitution fully behind the aspiration of social equality among the races. The possibilities of law as an engine of social justice seem to be encapsulated in the story of the decision — and in the many decades of resistance to its enforcement.


Today, there are those who argue that the Court failed in its goal, since actual racial mixing in U.S. schools has declined steadily over the last 35 years. But in her new book, In Brown’s Wake: Legacies of America’s Educational Landmark (Oxford UP, 2011), Harvard Law School Dean Martha Minow argues that the legacy of Brown should be viewed in a larger context. Neither a self-executing mandate for racial equality nor a futile rhetorical exercise, the decision was destined to become a lodestar for a wide variety of reformers in all areas of American society — and beyond.


In a series of case studies, Dean Minow’s book reveals how Brown, the milestone in American jurisprudence, took on meanings the judges never envisioned, in the hands of advocates who, in 1954, nobody could have expected. Whatever else it was, the decision was that vital ingredient to be coupled with any kind of action: an idea whose time had come.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sep 07 2011

47mins

Play

Martha Minow, “In Brown’s Wake: Legacies of America’s Educational Landmark” (Oxford UP, 2011)

New Books in Law
Episode artwork
Read more

What can judges do to change society? Fifty-seven years ago, the Supreme Court resolved to find out: the unanimous ruling they issued in Brown v. Board of Education threw the weight of the Constitution fully behind the aspiration of social equality among the races. The possibilities of law as an engine of social justice seem to be encapsulated in the story of the decision — and in the many decades of resistance to its enforcement.


Today, there are those who argue that the Court failed in its goal, since actual racial mixing in U.S. schools has declined steadily over the last 35 years. But in her new book, In Brown’s Wake: Legacies of America’s Educational Landmark (Oxford UP, 2011), Harvard Law School Dean Martha Minow argues that the legacy of Brown should be viewed in a larger context. Neither a self-executing mandate for racial equality nor a futile rhetorical exercise, the decision was destined to become a lodestar for a wide variety of reformers in all areas of American society — and beyond.


In a series of case studies, Dean Minow’s book reveals how Brown, the milestone in American jurisprudence, took on meanings the judges never envisioned, in the hands of advocates who, in 1954, nobody could have expected. Whatever else it was, the decision was that vital ingredient to be coupled with any kind of action: an idea whose time had come.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sep 07 2011

47mins

Play

Martha Minow, “In Brown’s Wake: Legacies of America’s Educational Landmark” (Oxford UP, 2011)

New Books in Education
Episode artwork
Read more

What can judges do to change society? Fifty-seven years ago, the Supreme Court resolved to find out: the unanimous ruling they issued in Brown v. Board of Education threw the weight of the Constitution fully behind the aspiration of social equality among the races. The possibilities of law as an engine of social justice seem to be encapsulated in the story of the decision — and in the many decades of resistance to its enforcement.


Today, there are those who argue that the Court failed in its goal, since actual racial mixing in U.S. schools has declined steadily over the last 35 years. But in her new book, In Brown’s Wake: Legacies of America’s Educational Landmark (Oxford UP, 2011), Harvard Law School Dean Martha Minow argues that the legacy of Brown should be viewed in a larger context. Neither a self-executing mandate for racial equality nor a futile rhetorical exercise, the decision was destined to become a lodestar for a wide variety of reformers in all areas of American society — and beyond.


In a series of case studies, Dean Minow’s book reveals how Brown, the milestone in American jurisprudence, took on meanings the judges never envisioned, in the hands of advocates who, in 1954, nobody could have expected. Whatever else it was, the decision was that vital ingredient to be coupled with any kind of action: an idea whose time had come.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sep 07 2011

47mins

Play