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Johnny Hodges Podcasts

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9 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Johnny Hodges. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Johnny Hodges, often where they are interviewed.

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9 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Johnny Hodges. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Johnny Hodges, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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The Inimitable Johnny Hodges

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There’s a big difference between the two greatest jazz stars on the alto horn. Charlie Parker had imitators without number; Johnny Hodges was simply inimitable. Parker, known as Bird, broke frontiers of speed, harmonic invention, and all-round excitement. Hodges, known as Rabbit, or Jeep, is best known for blues feeling, storytelling, and the sheer beauty of his sound and tone, in all the varieties and moods that could come out of an alto saxophone, at different moments lyrical, earthy, elegiac, and sensual. Hodges said he liked the idea of making “alley music,” yet he could sound like a whisper to your heart, as well.  This hour it’s Johnny Hodges’s turn, on the occasion of Con Chapman’s biography of him.

Johnny Hodges, right, plays alongside Al Sears in 1946.

Out of another age in high pop culture, we’re rediscovering songs without words this hour, from an expressionless man—until the moment he picked up his horn. From the 1920s into 1970, four decades, Johnny Hodges was the standby solo star in Duke Ellington’s jazz orchestra. Other bandleaders said Duke could afford not to feature a boy singer or a girl singer, as they were known then, because he had Hodges in his band.

Johnny Hodges’s voice came in three registers: blues, ballads and, a rarity in jazz, the art song. That sound of Johnny Hodges is the thread, the plot of this radio hour: about a forgotten grand master of American music whose biography has finally been written: Rabbit’s Blues from the Oxford University Press, by a Boston lawyer and fellow Hodges cultist, Con Chapman. It’s an overdue account of an artist who barely spoke but stirred hearts his own way, not so unlike Charlie Chaplin or the other silent movie star Buster Keaton, known as “the great stone face”—which described Hodges as well. What Johnny Hodges did was liberate and lift Adolph Sax’s mid-range horn out of the marching-band, into the far upper reaches of solo expression. And he played it with “a tone so beautiful,” Duke Ellington said, “it sometimes brought tears to the eyes.” 

In Boston, Hodges played at venues like the Black and White Club and Hotel Avery.

We’re close-listening to Hodges’s wide range of music—and taking a tour of the neighborhood where he hatched his sound. Long-time community activist and former state representative Byron Rushing is our guide. He’s walking us back into the intellectual and cultural cauldron of Hodges’ youth, a scene that included fellow saxophonist Harry Carney as well as journalist William Monroe Trotter and the painter Allan Crite. We’re joined also by Robin D.G. Kelley, the preeminent historian and biographer of Thelonious Monk.

On Sussex Street in the South End of Boston, Chris meets up with Byron Rushing, who says the small brick houses and apartments in the area here were originally “built for the working class.”

Thank you for listening. The YouTube playlist here and below contains (most of) the Hodges tracks contained in the the program. You can find an excerpt of Chapman’s new book here.

The post The Inimitable Johnny Hodges appeared first on Open Source with Christopher Lydon.

Jan 03 2020 · 50mins
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Rabbit’s Blues: The Story of Johnny Hodges

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For over 40 years, alto saxophonist Johnny Hodges was the primary solo voice of the Duke Ellington Orchestra. 2019 brought the first ever biography of this timeless jazz giant: “Rabbit’s Blues: The Life & Music of Johnny Hodges” by author Con Chapman, published by Oxford University Press. For this episode we talked with the author of this important biography.

Playlist

“Jeep’s Blues” Johnny Hodges with Duke Ellington
“Smada” Johnny Hodges with Duke Ellington
“In a Sentimental Mood” Johnny Hodges with Lawrence Welk
“The Intimacy of the Blues” Johnny Hodges with Duke Ellington
“Wishing & Waiting” Johnny Hodges
“Bechet’s Fantasy” Sidney Bechet
“The Blues with a Feelin'” Johnny Hodges with Duke Ellington
“Don’t Get Around Much Anymore” Johnny Hodges
“Things Ain’t What They Used To Be” Johnny Hodges
“Passion Flower” Johnny Hodges
“Funky Blues” Johnny Hodges & Charlie Parker
“On the Sunny Side of the Street” Johnny Hodges
“Blood Count” Johnny Hodges with Duke Ellington
“Warm Valley” Johnny Hodges with Duke Ellington

The post Rabbit’s Blues: The Story of Johnny Hodges appeared first on The Joys of Jazz.

Dec 07 2019 · 1hr

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“Rabbit’s Blues” – A Conversation with Johnny Hodges biographer Con Chapman (Podcast #19-018)

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https://ellingtonreflectionsdotcom.files.wordpress.com/2019/10/rabbitc292s-blues-podcast.mp3

“You ever drink any cool, clean spring water? You can add things to it, make lemonade, beer, coffee, or what have you, but when you’re thirsty it’s hard to beat it just as it is. And it’s probably better for you than the kind hyped up with chlorine. Well, to me, Johnny [Hodges] was like that spring water – the real thing, unadulterated. He didn’t change either. Maybe he added ideas as he went along, but he was always true to himself.”

Earl “Fatha” Hines

Johnny Hodges interviewed by Willis Conover in 1955

From the Oxford University Press Blog – Seven Things You Don’t Know About Johnny Hodges

The recordings heard on this podcast episode:

Rabbit’s Blues (CD: “The Best of Johnny Hodges” Worten Jazz 221 407-205)

Recorded 15 January 1951

Nelson Williams – trumpet; Lawrence Brown – trombone; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Al Sears – tenor sax; Leroy Lovett – piano; Al McKibbon – bass; Sonny Greer – drums; Billy Strayhorn – arranger.

Wabash Blues (CD: “Back to Back” Verve Records 521 404-2)

Recorded 20 February 1959, New York City

Harry “Sweets” Edison – trumpet; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Duke Ellington – piano; Les Spann – guitar; Al Hall – bass; Jo Jones – drums.

The Giddybug Gallop (CD: “Highlights of the Great 1940-1942 Band” Avid AMSC1143)

Recorded 5 June 1941, Los Angeles

Wallace Jones, Ray Nance, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Otto Hardwicke, Johnny Hodges, Barney Bigard, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Jimmie Blanton – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.

Jeep’s Blues (CD: “The Duke’s Men, Volume 2” Columbia Jazz Masterpieces C2K 48835)

Recorded 28 March 1938, New York City

Cootie Williams – trumpet; Lawrence Brown – trombone; Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Billy Taylor – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.

The Jeep Is Jumpin’

Recorded 24 August 1938, New York City

Same personnel as “Jeep’s Blues”

Blood Count (CD: “The Jaywalker” Storyville Records 101 8390)

Recorded 23 June 1967, Los Angeles

Cootie Williams, Cat Anderson, Herbie Jones, Mercer Ellington – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Buster Cooper, Chuck Connors – trombone; Johnny Hodges, Russell Procope, Jimmy Hamilton, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; John Lamb – bass; Chris Columbus – drums.

Oct 22 2019 · 40mins
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Con Chapman on the life and music of iconic jazz saxophonist Johnny Hodges (9/12/19)

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In his 1970 eulogy of saxophonist Johnny Hodges, fellow jazz legend Duke Ellington ended with the words, “never the world's most highly animated showman or greatest stage personality, but a tone so beautiful it sometimes brought tears to the eyes—this was Johnny Hodges. This is Johnny Hodges.” Hodges’s celebrated technique and silky tone marked him then, and still today, as one of the most important and influential saxophone players in the history of jazz. In Con Chapman’s first-ever biography of this musical giant, “Rabbit's Blues: The Life and Music of Johnny Hodges” details his place as one of the premier artists of the alto sax in jazz history, and his role as co-composer with Ellington. Join us for a discussion of the musical contributions of Johnny Hodges with Con Chapman in this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI.
Sep 12 2019 · 56mins

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Portrait of Johnny Hodges, Pt. III (Podcast #19-002)

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https://ellingtonreflectionsdotcom.files.wordpress.com/2019/01/portrait-of-johnny-hodges-new-total.mp3“You ever drink any cool, clean spring water? You can add things to it, make lemonade, beer, coffee, or what have you, but when you’re thirsty it’s hard to beat it just as it is. And it’s probably better for you than the kind hyped up with chlorine. Well, to me, Johnny [Hodges] was like that spring water – the real thing, unadulterated. He didn’t change either. Maybe he added ideas as he went along, but he was always true to himself.”

Earl “Fatha” Hines

Johnny Hodges

1963 Payroll ledger sheet for the Duke Ellington Orchestra. Johnny Hodges (line 12) was the highest paid member of the band.

Click here for a link to hear Johnny Hodges interview by Willis Conover

The recordings heard on this podcast episode:

  1. Jeep’s Blues (CD: “Ellington at Newport 1956 (Complete)” Columbia Legacy C2K 64932)

    Recorded 07 July, 1956 Live at The Newport Jazz Festival Newport, RI

    Cat Anderson, Clark Terry, Willie Cook, Ray Nance – trumpet; Britt Woodman, Quentin Jackson, John Sanders – trombone; Johnny Hodges, Russell Procope, Paul Gonsalves, Jimmy Hamilton, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Jimmy Woode – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums.

Half the Fun / The Star-Crossed Lovers (LP/CD “Such Sweet Thunder” Columbia CL 1033/Columbia/Legacy 65568)

Recorded 24 April 1957, New York City

Willie Cook, Cat Anderson(t); Clark Terry(t,fl); Ray Nance – violin; Britt Woodman, Quentin Jackson, John Sanders – trombones; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Jimmy Woode – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums.

Flirtibird (CD: “Anatomy of a Murder” Columbia/Legacy CK 65569)

Recorded early June 1959 in Los Angeles

Cat Anderson, Harold Baker, Gerald Wilson, Clark Terry, Ray Nance – trumpet; Britt Woodman, Quentin Jackson, John Sanders – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn – piano; Jimmy Woode – bass; Jimmy Johnson – drums.

The Midnight Sun Will Never Set / Goodbye (CD: “Recollections Of The Big Band Era” Atlantic Jazz ‎– 7 90043-2)

Rondolet (CD: “Duke Ellington ‎– The Private Collection, Volume Eight Studio Sessions” Saja Records ‎– 7 91232-2)

Hi, June (CD: “Cool Rock” LaserLight Digital ‎– 15 782)

Blood Count (LP: “The Greatest Jazz Concert In The World” Pablo Records ‎– 2625 704)

Snibor (CD: “…And his Mother called him Bill” RCA 6287)

Recorded 28 August 1967, New York City

Cootie Williams, Cat Anderson, Herbie Jones, Mercer Ellington – trumpets; Clark Terry – flugelhorn; Lawrence Brown, Buster Cooper – trombones; Chuck Connors – bass trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Aaron Bell – bass; Steve Little – drums.

Blues for New Orleans (CD: “New Orleans Suite,” Warner Bros. 7411644)

Recorded 27 April, 1970 New York City

Cootie Williams, Al Rubin, Mercer Ellington, Fred Stone – trumpets; Booty Wood, Julian Priester, Malcolm Taylor – trombones; Russell Procope, Norris Turney, Johnny Hodges, Harold Ashby, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Wild Bill Davis – organ; Duke Ellington – piano; Joe Benjamin – bass; Rufus Jones – drums.

— Our closing music —-

It’s Something You Ought To Know (Paul Gonsalves – “Ellingtonia Moods and Blues,” RCA Victor / RCA63562)

Recorded 29 February 1960, New York City

Paul Gonsalves- tenor sax; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Ray Nance – cornet; Mitchell “Booty” Wood – trombone; Jimmy Jones – piano; Al Hall – bass; Oliver Jackson – drums.

Jan 20 2019 · 1hr
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Portrait of Johnny Hodges, Pt. II (Podcast #19-001)

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https://ellingtonreflectionsdotcom.files.wordpress.com/2019/01/portrait-of-johnny-hodges-pt.-ii.mp3

“I don’t suppose there is anybody in the business who can do more with a melody than Johnny Hodges.”

Wild Bill Davis

Johnny Hodges and Billy Strayhorn

The recordings heard on this podcast episode:

Straight Back (CD: “The Complete Verve Johnny Hodges Small Group Sessions 1956-61” Mosaic MD6-200)

Recorded 7 April 1959, New York City

Harold “Shorty” Baker – trumpet; Quentin Jackson, John Sanders – trombone; Johnny Hodges, Jimmy Hamilton, Ben Webster – reeds; Jimmy Jones – piano; Les Spann – guitar; Ray Brown – bass; Jo Jones – drums.

Echoes of Harlem/ Black, Brown and Beautiful (CD: Oliver Nelson “Black, Brown and Beautiful” )

Recorded 17/19 March 1970, New York City

Ernie Royal, Snooky Young, Marvin Stamm, Randy Brecker – trumpets; Al Grey, Garnett Brown, Quentin Jackson, Thomas Mitchell – trombones; Johnny Hodges, Danny Bank, Frank Wess, Jerome Richardson, Jerry Dodgion, Joe Farrell, Bob Ashton – reeds; Hank Jones – piano; Ron Carter – bass; Grady Tate – drums.

Wanderlust (CD: Johnny Hodges “Buenos Aires Blues” Lone Hill Jazz ‎– LHJ10373)

Recorded 26 May 1963, New York City

Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Lalo Schifrin – piano; Barry Galbraith – guitar; George Duvivier – bass; Dave Baker – drums.

Squatty Roo (CD: “Johnny Hodges, Verve Jazz Masters 35” Verve 314 521 857-2)

Recorded 20 February 1959, New York City

Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Dizzy Gillespie – trumpet; Junior Mance – piano; Les Spann – guitar; Sam Jones – bass; Lex Humphries – drums.

Back Beat (CD: “Johnny Hodges, Verve Jazz Masters 35” Verve 314 521 857-2)

Recorded 17 November 1959, Los Angeles

Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Gerry Mulligan – baritone sax; Claude Williamson – piano; Buddy Clark – bass; Mel Lewis – drums.

In a Sentimental Mood (CD: “Johnny Hodges with Lawrence Welk’s Orchestra” Ranwood Records 8246)

Recorded 21 December 1965, Los Angeles

Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Lawrence Welk orchestra – musicians uncredited.

Rabbit Out of the Hat (CD: “Con Soul & Sax/Wild Bill is the Boss” Lone Hill Jazz LHJ10283)

Recorded 17 January 1966, New York City

Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Lawrence Brown – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton – clarinet; Wild Bill Davis – organ; Billy Butler – guitar; Bob Bushnell – bass; Joe Marshall – drums.

Stolen Sweets (CD: “Mess of Blues” Lone Hill Jazz LHJ10285)

Recorded 3/4 September 1963, New York City

Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Wild Bill Davis – organ; Kenny Burrell – guitar; Osie Johnson – drums.

Don’t Sleep in The Subway (CD: “Johnny Hodges, Verve Jazz Masters 35” Verve 314 521 857-2)

Recorded 17, 18, 21 August 1967, Los Angeles

Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Ernie Royal, Snooky Young – trumpet; Bill Berry – trumpet, vibraphone; Tony Studd – bass trombone; Jerome Richardson, Frank Wess – flute, clarinet, alto sax; Jimmy Hamilton – clarinet, tenor sax; Danny Bank – baritone sax, clarinet; Hank Jones – piano; Everett Barksdale – guitar; Milt Hinton – bass; Grady Tate – drums; Jimmy Jones – arranger, conductor

Broadway Babe (CD: Mercer Ellington “Stepping Into Swing Society” Fresh Sound Records FSR-CD 531)

Recorded 20 July 1958, New York City

Cat Anderson, Harold “Shorty” Baker, Clark Terry – trumpet; Britt Woodman, Quentin Jackson, John Sanders – trombone; Johnny Hodges, Russell Procope, Jimmy Hamilton, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Jimmy Jones – piano; Skeeter Best – guitar; Wendell Marshall -bass; Joe Marshall – drums.

The Gal From Joe’s/ Your Love Has Faded (CD: “Johnny Hodges, soloist, Billy Strayhorn and The Orchestra” Verve 314 557 543-2)

Recorded 11/12 December 1961, New York City

Cat Anderson, Harold “Shorty” Baker, Ed Mullens, Bill Berry – trumpets; Lawrence Brown, Quentin Jackson, Chuck Connors – trombones; Johnny Hodges, Russell Procope, Jimmy Hamilton, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Billy Strayhorn – piano; Jimmy Jones – piano; Aaron Bell – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums.

Once Upon a Time (CD: Earl Hines “Once Upon a Time” Impulse! A-9108)

Recorded 10/11 January 1966, New York City

Cat Anderson, Clark Terry, Ray Nance, Bill Berry – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Buster Cooper – trombone; Johnny Hodges, Russell Procope – alto sax; Paul Gonsalves, Harold Ashby – tenor sax; Earl “Fatha” Hines – piano; Aaron Bell -bass; Elvin Jones – drums.

— Our closing music —-

It’s Something You Ought To Know (Paul Gonsalves – “Ellingtonia Moods and Blues,” RCA Victor / RCA63562)

Recorded 29 February 1960, New York City

Paul Gonsalves- tenor sax; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Ray Nance – cornet; Mitchell “Booty” Wood – trombone; Jimmy Jones – piano; Al Hall – bass; Oliver Jackson – drums.

Jan 05 2019 · 1hr 14mins
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Portrait of Johnny Hodges, Pt. I (Podcast #18-020)

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https://ellingtonreflectionsdotcom.files.wordpress.com/2018/12/Portrait-of-Johnny-Hodges-part-I.mp3

“As a youngster, Johnny Hodges was a saxophonist in Boston whose style, in the estimation of all other alto saxophonists, was unique. Even now, I have never yet met and don’t know of a saxophonist who didn’t say he was knocked out by Johnny Hodges”

-Duke Ellington, Music is my Mistress

Mark Sowlakis‘ blog post on Johnny Hodges, which features several transcriptions, can be found at this link

Birth record for Cornelius Hodge

Johnny Hodge(s)’ application for a Social Security Number

Cootie Williams, Harry Carney and Johnny Hodges – 1938

Ben Webster, Charlie Parker, and Johnny Hodges – 1952

The recordings heard on this podcast episode:

Tishomingo Blues (CD: “Early Ellington – The Complete Brunswick and Vocalion Recordings of Duke Ellington, 1926-1931” Decca/MCA Records GRD-3-640)

Recorded 25 June 1928, New York City

James “Bubber” Miley – trumpet; Joe “Tricky Sam” Nanton – trombone; Johnny Hodges, Barney Bigard, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Freddy Guy – banjo; Wellman Braud – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.

Jeep’s Blues (CD: “The Duke’s Men, Volume 2” Columbia Jazz Masterpieces C2K 48835)

Recorded 28 March 1938, New York City

Cootie Williams – trumpet; Lawrence Brown – trombone; Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Billy Taylor – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.

The Jeep Is Jumpin’

Recorded 24 August 1938, New York City

Same personnel as “Jeep’s Blues”

Ridin’ on a Blue Note (CD: “Cotton Club 1938, Volume 1” Galaxy Music 3801122)

Recorded 1 May 1938, New York City

Wallace Jones, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Barney Bigard, Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Billy Taylor – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.

On the Sunny Side of the Street (CD: “The Complete Lionel Hampton Victor Sessions 1937-1941” Mosaic Records MD5-238)

Recorded 26 April 1937, New York City

Lionel Hampton – vibraphone, vocal; Buster Bailey – clarinet; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Jess Stacy – piano; Allan Reuss -guitar; John Kirby – bass; Cozy Cole -drums.

On the Sunny Side of the Street (LP: “Indiana Live Session, June 1945” Musidisc ‎– JA 5135)

Recorded 16 June 1945, Evansville, Indiana

Cat Anderson, Ray Nance, Rex Stewart, Shelton Hemphill, Taft Jordan – trumpet; Claude Jones, Joe Nanton, Lawrence Brown – trombone; Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Jimmy Hamilton, Al Sears, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Junior Raglin – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.

(CD: “Highlights of the Great 1940-1942 Band” Avid AMSC1143)

Blue Goose

Recorded 28 May 1940, Chicago

Wallace Jones, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Otto Hardwicke, Johnny Hodges, Barney Bigard, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Jimmie Blanton – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.

In A Mellotone

Recorded 5 September 1940, Chicago

Same personnel as “Blue Goose”

The Giddybug Gallop 

Recorded 5 June 1941, Los Angeles

Same personnel as “Blue Goose” except Ray Nance replaces Cootie Williams

Mood to be Woo’ed (CD: “Duke Ellington And His Orchestra – 1943 & 1945 Volume Three” Circle ‎– CCD-103)

Recorded 2 January 1945, New York City

Cat Anderson, Ray Nance, Rex Stewart, Shelton Hemphill, Taft Jordan – trumpet; Claude Jones, Joe Nanton, Lawrence Brown – trombone; Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Jimmy Hamilton, Al Sears, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Junior Raglin – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.

Castle Rock (CD: “Johnny Hodges – Seven Classic Albums” Real Gone ‎– RGJCD312)

Recorded 3 March 1951, New York City

Emmett Berry – trumpet; Lawrence Brown – trombone; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Al Sears – tenor sax; Leroy Lovett – piano; Lloyd Trotman – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.

In A Mellow Tone (CD: John Coltrane “First Giant Steps” RLR Records, RLR 88619)

Recorded June 1954, Los Angeles

Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Harold “Shorty” Baker – trumpet; Lawrence Brown – trombone; John Coltrane – tenor sax; Cal Cobbs (?) – piano; Joe Williams – bass; Joe Marshall – drums.

What is this Thing Called Love (CD: Charlie Parker “Jam Session” Verve Records ‎– 833 564-2)

Recorded July 1952, Los Angeles

Charlie Shavers – trumpet; Johnny Hodges, Benny Carter, Charlie Parker – alto sax; Ben Webster, Flip Phillips – tenor sax; Oscar Peterson – piano; Barney Kessell – guitar; Ray Brown – bass; J. C. Heard – drums.

— Our closing music —-

It’s Something You Ought To Know (Paul Gonsalves – “Ellingtonia Moods and Blues,” RCA Victor / RCA63562)

Recorded 29 February 1960, New York City

Paul Gonsalves- tenor sax; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Ray Nance – cornet; Mitchell “Booty” Wood – trombone; Jimmy Jones – piano; Al Hall – bass; Oliver Jackson – drums.

Dec 15 2018 · 1hr 11mins
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Big Band Serenade 90 "Johnny Hodges"

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Big Band
Serenade presents The Great Saxophonist Johnny Hodges,The Music on this
program is listed in order of play;

1)"Jeeps Blues" 1938 Duke Ellington w/Johnny Hodges,2)"Prelude To A Kiss" 1938,3)"Passion Flower", 4)"Things Ain't What They Used To Be" 1941, 5)"Far Away Blues" 1947, 6)"Believe It Beloved", 7)"Tenderly" 1952, 8)"Tea For Two" 1952, 9)"Who's Excited" 1952, 10)"Good Queen Bess", 1940, 11)"Duke's Blues" 1952,12)"Wham" 1952

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Mar 10 2007 · 44mins
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Johnny Hodges (April 17, 1983)

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Bud shares his knowledge and expansive music collection to uncover the life and music of Johnny Hodges.

Cornelius "Johnny" Hodges (July 25, 1907 – May 11, 1970) was an American alto saxophonist, best known for solo work with Duke Ellington's big band. He played lead alto in the saxophone section for many years. Hodges was also featured on soprano saxophone, but refused to play soprano after 1946. He is considered one of the definitive alto saxophone players of the big band era (along with Benny Carter).

After beginning his career as a teenager in Boston, Hodges began to travel to New York and played with Lloyd Scott, Sidney Bechet, Luckey Roberts and Chick Webb. When Ellington wanted to expand his band in 1928, Ellington's clarinet player Barney Bigard recommended Hodges. His playing became one of the identifying voices of the Ellington orchestra. From 1951 to 1955, Hodges left the Duke to lead his own band, but returned shortly before Ellington's triumphant return to prominence – the orchestra's performance at the 1956 Newport Jazz Festival.
Apr 18 1983 · 59mins