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Clayton Dube

7 Podcast Episodes

Latest 6 Aug 2022 | Updated Daily

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“When is it a Trade War? – Part 2 - “I wasn’t surprised with this trade war.” - Clayton Dube

USC IBEAR Business Class

In the first year of his presidency Donald Trump largely avoided trade issues with China. As the second year unfolded, Clay Dube notes that the President seems to have returned to the attack mode promised in the campaign. As policies shift daily, Business Class asked Clayton Dube, the Director of the USC US – China Institute, to take a look at the Trump playbook and bring his insight to the Administration’s game plan.Clayton Dube, is the Director of the USC U.S - China Institute

16mins

31 May 2018

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Clayton Dube - Opening Remarks, Through Tinted Lenses? Conference

Through Tinted Lenses? How Chinese and Americans See Each Other

Clayton Dube opened the USC U.S.-China Institute's "Through Tinted Lenses?" conference, arguing that the images and attitudes Americans and Chinese hold toward each other and each other's countries matter. Those images, he said, affect the decision-making of individuals, of businesses, and of governments. Dube noted how in the 2012 U.S. election politicians and political ad-makers sought to exploit ideas voters had about China and went on to discuss images that Chinese television viewers in the 1980s got of the U.S. from shows such as Hunter and how the more recent television program Prison Break offered a rather different portrayal of the U.S. Dube noted that today, Americans and Chinese have access to information about each other from far more sources than ever before, yet don't seem to like or trust the other as much as we once did. He invited the other participants and the audience to join in the exploration of dominant images, how they are formed and change, and how they affect policies and behavior.Clayton Dube has headed the USC U.S.-China Institute since it was established in 2006. Dube first lived and worked in China from 1982 to 1985 and has since visited often to carry out research, teach, or lead study tours. He teaches history and has received teaching awards at three universities.

16mins

1 Nov 2013

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Clayton Dube - Opening Remarks, Through Tinted Lenses? Conference

Through Tinted Lenses? How Chinese and Americans See Each Other (Audio Only)

Clayton Dube opened the USC U.S.-China Institute's "Through Tinted Lenses?" conference, arguing that the images and attitudes Americans and Chinese hold toward each other and each other's countries matter. Those images, he said, affect the decision-making of individuals, of businesses, and of governments. Dube noted how in the 2012 U.S. election politicians and political ad-makers sought to exploit ideas voters had about China and went on to discuss images that Chinese television viewers in the 1980s got of the U.S. from shows such as Hunter and how the more recent television program Prison Break offered a rather different portrayal of the U.S. Dube noted that today, Americans and Chinese have access to information about each other from far more sources than ever before, yet don't seem to like or trust the other as much as we once did. He invited the other participants and the audience to join in the exploration of dominant images, how they are formed and change, and how they affect policies and behavior.Clayton Dube has headed the USC U.S.-China Institute since it was established in 2006. Dube first lived and worked in China from 1982 to 1985 and has since visited often to carry out research, teach, or lead study tours. He teaches history and has received teaching awards at three universities.

16mins

1 Nov 2013

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Clayton Dube on the 2012 Taiwan Election Process, Outcomes, and Implications

Taiwan Election 2012: Outcomes and Implications (Audio Only)

Clayton Dube gave two short presentations. He first noted how important an issue the U.S.-Taiwan relationship had been in earlier American elections. For example, in November 1958, Chinese leader Mao Zedong ordered heavy shelling of Jinmen in an attempt to influence the congressional election (see Talking Points, Nov. 4, 2011 for details). In 1960, support for Taiwan (called Formosa) dominated the presidential debates between John Kennedy and Richard Nixon. Dube discussed how different the Taiwan-China relationship is today from fifty years and American attitudes toward regional security.In the second presentation (included in the same video below), Dube compared the results of the 2012 presidential election with that of 2008. He looked at the key issues in the campaign, highlighted advertising efforts and campaign strategies, and included images from Ma Ying-jeou, Tsai Ing-wen, and James Soong rallies. Dube also discussed the process of voting and vote-counting and ended with a review of some of the questions for Taiwan-China ties and U.S.-China relations raised by the results.Clayton Dube (杜克雷) has headed the USC U.S.-China Institute (南加州大学美中学院) since it was established in 2006. Dube was previously the UCLA Asia Institute's Assistant Director.

31mins

7 Feb 2012

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Clayton Dube on the 2012 Taiwan Election Process, Outcomes, and Implications

Taiwan Election 2012: Outcomes and Implications

Clayton Dube gave two short presentations. He first noted how important an issue the U.S.-Taiwan relationship had been in earlier American elections. For example, in November 1958, Chinese leader Mao Zedong ordered heavy shelling of Jinmen in an attempt to influence the congressional election (see Talking Points, Nov. 4, 2011 for details). In 1960, support for Taiwan (called Formosa) dominated the presidential debates between John Kennedy and Richard Nixon. Dube discussed how different the Taiwan-China relationship is today from fifty years and American attitudes toward regional security.In the second presentation (included in the same video below), Dube compared the results of the 2012 presidential election with that of 2008. He looked at the key issues in the campaign, highlighted advertising efforts and campaign strategies, and included images from Ma Ying-jeou, Tsai Ing-wen, and James Soong rallies. Dube also discussed the process of voting and vote-counting and ended with a review of some of the questions for Taiwan-China ties and U.S.-China relations raised by the results.Clayton Dube (杜克雷) has headed the USC U.S.-China Institute (南加州大学美中学院) since it was established in 2006. Dube was previously the UCLA Asia Institute's Assistant Director.

31mins

7 Feb 2012

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Clayton Dube: Opening Remarks

The State of the Chinese Economy (Audio Only)

Clayton Dube (杜克雷) has headed the USC U.S.-China Institute since it was established by USC President C.L. Nikias in 2006 to focus on the multidimensional U.S.-China relationship. USCI enhances understanding of complex and evolving U.S.-China ties through cutting-edge social science research, innovative graduate and undergraduate training, extensive and influential public events, and professional development efforts.Dube came to USC after serving as the assistant director of UCLA’s Asia Institute. During his tenure there, he managed the U.S. Department of Education designated East Asian Studies National Resource Center. He also headed the Asian studies teacher training program and oversaw a variety of instructional, research, and outreach initiatives. Among the projects he directed there were two student-driven web publications, AsiaMedia and Asia Pacific Arts, each of which had more than one million readers annually. At USC he created another successful publication, US-China Today (uschina.usc.edu), and relaunched Asia Pacific Arts (asiapacificarts.usc.edu). Dube’s won teaching awards at three universities.Dube has produced two documentary films and consulted on several others. He’s currently heads a USCI team producing the six-part Assignment: China documentary series on American media coverage of China since the 1940s. He writes USCI’s popularTalking Points newsletter. He is frequently called upon by American and Chinese broadcast and print media to comment on current affairs. Dube’s has been supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Education and the Committee for Scholarly Communication with China. His research focuses on how economic and political change in China since 1900 affected the lives of people in small towns, on how Americans and Chinese see each other, and how governments work to influence those views. He’s written teaching guides on Chinese history, many reviews, and served as associate editor for Modern China, an academic quarterly published by Sage Publications, from 1998 to 2002. Dube received the 2012 Perryman Fund Social Studies Educator of the Year award. Dube serves as a director of the National Consortium for Teaching about Asia. He's also a Center on Public Diplomacy fellow and is on the executive committees of the Center for International Studies and the Center for International Business Education and Research. He serves on the Education about Asia editorial board and the LinkAsia (LinkTV) advisory board.

11mins

25 Feb 2011

Episode artwork

Clayton Dube: Opening Remarks

The State of the Chinese Economy

Clayton Dube (杜克雷) has headed the USC U.S.-China Institute since it was established by USC President C.L. Nikias in 2006 to focus on the multidimensional U.S.-China relationship. USCI enhances understanding of complex and evolving U.S.-China ties through cutting-edge social science research, innovative graduate and undergraduate training, extensive and influential public events, and professional development efforts.Dube came to USC after serving as the assistant director of UCLA’s Asia Institute. During his tenure there, he managed the U.S. Department of Education designated East Asian Studies National Resource Center. He also headed the Asian studies teacher training program and oversaw a variety of instructional, research, and outreach initiatives. Among the projects he directed there were two student-driven web publications, AsiaMedia and Asia Pacific Arts, each of which had more than one million readers annually. At USC he created another successful publication, US-China Today (uschina.usc.edu), and relaunched Asia Pacific Arts (asiapacificarts.usc.edu). Dube’s won teaching awards at three universities.Dube has produced two documentary films and consulted on several others. He’s currently heads a USCI team producing the six-part Assignment: China documentary series on American media coverage of China since the 1940s. He writes USCI’s popularTalking Points newsletter. He is frequently called upon by American and Chinese broadcast and print media to comment on current affairs. Dube’s has been supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Education and the Committee for Scholarly Communication with China. His research focuses on how economic and political change in China since 1900 affected the lives of people in small towns, on how Americans and Chinese see each other, and how governments work to influence those views. He’s written teaching guides on Chinese history, many reviews, and served as associate editor for Modern China, an academic quarterly published by Sage Publications, from 1998 to 2002. Dube received the 2012 Perryman Fund Social Studies Educator of the Year award. Dube serves as a director of the National Consortium for Teaching about Asia. He's also a Center on Public Diplomacy fellow and is on the executive committees of the Center for International Studies and the Center for International Business Education and Research. He serves on the Education about Asia editorial board and the LinkAsia (LinkTV) advisory board.

11mins

25 Feb 2011