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Kate Young

35 Podcast Episodes

Latest 26 Nov 2022 | Updated Daily

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May 11, 2022 Salvador Dalí, Nathaniel Lord Britton, Katharine Stewart, Margaret Visser, The Little Library Cookbook by Kate Young, and Turtle Hail

The Daily Gardener

Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events 1904 Birth of Salvador Dalí, Spanish surrealist artist. Educated in Madrid, Salvador was a son of Catalonia, and he never lost his love for the beauty of his homeland. Early in his career, Salvador gravitated toward surrealism. By 1929, Salvador Dali was regarded as a leading figure in the art form.  Like Sigmund Freud, Salvador Dalí used the landscape to metaphor the human mind. He once said about the coastline of his beloved Catalonia, I personify the living core of this landscape. Today, two museums are devoted to Salvador Dalí's work: the Dalí Theatre-Museum in Figueres, Spain, and the Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida. And in 2020, the Marie Selby Botanical Gardens in Sarasota, Florida, presented Salvador Dalí: Gardens of the Mind. The exhibit's centerpiece was Flordalí, a fantastically-colored series of flower lithographs from 1968. In Flordali, Salvador created imaginary surrealist enhancements to favorite blossoms. He made Dahlia unicorns, which feature a twisted horn in the middle of the bloom.  Lilium musicum has vinyl records and sheet music for petals. Pisum sensuale is a sensory plant with fingers with painted nails and voluptuous lips. Panseé (Viola cogitans) is a self-portrait with pansies for the eyes and mouth.    1907 On this day, the American botanist Nathaniel Lord Britton was in Nantucket preparing for a lecture on plant protection. Nathaniel had brought along fifty colored lantern slides from the Van Brunt collection to use in his presentation. Nathaniel and his wife co-founded the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx, New York.  Nathaniel's time in Nantucket was brief - only for a day - but he wrote these observations in a letter about his trip. [On Nantucket] The mayflower is the most abundant of spring wildflowers, carpeting the moors on the south side of the island and lending a rich, spicy fragrance to the ocean breezes that sweep over these exposed tracts. It is in less danger from picking than from the surface fires, which are common occurrences in spring.  The later blooming wildflowers suffer more or less at the hands of summer tourists, but I was glad to observe that the residents of Nantucket as a whole are keenly alive to the importance of preserving the natural beauties of the island and carefully guard the localities for many rare plants, especially the Scotch heather and the two European heaths (Erica cinerea and E. tetralix) which occur there.   1923 On this day, a schoolyard garden reported outside of Lochness gave the following update, As sheep are constantly breaking into the garden work has been stopped till the walls are rendered sheep-proof.   This little entry was discovered by the modern-day owner of the property Katharine Stewart, and she shared it in her delightful month by month garden book called A Garden in the Hills (2006).  Katharine reflected on the journal entry regarding the sheep and wrote, I know exactly what he meant. More than sixty years later, the sheep, the more agile variety, are still sometimes managing to leap over the wall, where the superimposed netting has given way. That can mean goodbye to all the summer lettuce and the winter greens, not to mention the precious flowering plants and all the work that went into producing them.   The little school in the Scottish highlands closed in 1958. A few years later, Katharine and her husband, Sam, bought the property known as the croft at Abriachan near Loch Ness. There, Katharine began her writing. Reflecting on her first days in the garden at the croft, Katharine wrote, When we arrived, wild raspberries, willowherb, and sweet cicely had largely taken over. To bees and butterflies and to many kinds of birds, this was paradise! For us, it held all the thrill of uncharted territory. Every day a fresh discovery was made. Even now, I come on surprises each summer. Digging [has] revealed many other interesting things-worn-out toys, pieces of pottery, a pile of school slates from a dump against the top wall, evidently discarded when jotters came in-and, most interesting of all, several 'scrapers' dating from prehistoric times.  Meanwhile, I often imagine my predecessors here looking on the same outline of hills, the same scoop of the burn in the hollow, listening to the same sounds of lark and owl, the bark of deer, and many more long gone-the howl of wolf, maybe the growl of bear. The heather would have been their late summer delight, making drinks of tea or ale, thatching for their roofs, and kindling for their fires.  Sometimes envy them the simplicity of their lives, though the hardships must have been great. They didn't have a Christmas to celebrate, but they knew all about the winter solstice, and they must have been happy to see the bright berries on the holly, as we do today.   Late in life, Katharine Stewart went on to become a teacher and then her town's postmistress. She died in 2013 and is survived by her daughter, Hilda.   1940 Birth of Margaret Visser, South African-born writer, and broadcaster who lives in Toronto, Paris, and southwest France. Margaret writes about history and anthropology and the mythology of everyday life. She once wrote, Salt is the only rock directly consumed by man.  It corrodes but preserves, desiccates but is wrested from the water. It has fascinated man for thousands of years not only as a substance he prized and was willing to labour to obtain but also as a generator of poetic and of mythic meaning. The contradictions it embodies only intensify its power and its links with experience of the sacred.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation The Little Library Cookbook by Kate Young This book came out in 2018, and the British food writer and author Bee Wilson gushed, What a joy this is for hungry readers everywhere: stylish, fun, and clever. If there is comfort food, there is also comfort reading, and The Little Library Cookbook is it. The publisher writes, Would you like to taste Paddington Bear’s marmalade? Or a clam chowder from Moby Dick? You'll learn how to prepare the afternoon tea served at Manderley and decadent tarts the Queen of Hearts would love—all while reading food-related excerpts from your favorite books. Kate Young was inspired to write this book based on her amazing food blog called The Little Library Café. In The Little Library Cookbook, Kate offers over 100 recipes inspired by beloved works of fiction. There are dishes from classics and contemporary bestsellers with stories for people of any age. Among many others, you will find Turkish delight from Narnia, Mint Juleps from The Great Gatsby, Bread and Butter Pudding from Atonement, Curried Chicken from Sherlock Holmes,  Pancakes from Pippi Longstocking, Coconut Shortbread by Sarah Perry's The Essex Serpent,  Black Ice Cream from The Hundred and One Dalmations, Cinnamon Rolls from Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch, Spaghetti and Meatballs from The Godfather, Apple Pie from The Railway Children, and Honey Rosemary Tea Cakes inspired by Winnie the Pooh. This book is 320 pages of food in fiction brought to life by the sweet, funny, and intrepid blogger, cook, caterer, and writer Kate Young. You can get a copy of The Little Library Cookbook by Kate Young and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $15.   Botanic Spark 1894 On this day, Bovina ("Bo-VYE-na"), Mississippi, reported a case of turtle hail. Newspapers said that during a severe hailstorm, a six-inch-by-eight-inch gopher turtle, fell to the ground, completely encased in ice, at Bovina, which is located about seven miles east of Vicksburg in western Mississippi.    Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

12mins

11 May 2022

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Purdue: Podcasting for Universities w/ Kate Young

Brands That Podcast

In this week’s episode, we talk with the host, writer, and producer of This is Purdue, Kate Young, about why a university like Purdue would start a podcast.You’ll hear how they measure success, what their goals are with the podcast, how it impacts growth at the university, and how they grew to 116,000 listeners in 2021.Guest-at-a-GlanceName: Kate YoungWhat she does: Host, writer, and producer of the This is Purdue podcastConnect with her: LinkedInKey TakeawaysUse YouTube as a way to grow your podcast.Don’t forget about YouTube when it comes to sharing your podcast. Particularly, if you record video versions of your episodes. The Purdue team uses a mix of organic and paid strategies to boost their podcast views by taking an entire 40-minute interview, optimizing the titles and descriptions, and also uploading the audio version of the podcast using Wavve or Headliner. They’ve seen a 195% increase in downloads using this strategy.Podcasting allows you to tell a more personal story.Purdue uses their podcast as a pure brand play. Rather than writing these stories, they bring on faculty, alumni, and students so listeners can hear these stories directly from the voices making an impact on their school. Not only does this create a sense of community within students, but it also connects alumni and faculty back to their alma mater.You can reach older alumni by sharing the podcast RSS feed on Facebook.Some of the older alumni might not be as familiar with podcasts or podcast apps. So in order to reach that audience, the Purdue team connects the podcast’s RSS feed to Facebook so people can listen directly from that platform. YouTube would be another great way to reach an audience who might be less likely to subscribe to a podcast but are more likely to subscribe to a YouTube channel.It’s important to repurpose each episode into digestible social content.Purdue shares everything from audiograms and TikToks to short video clips and quote graphics for every episode they publish. Because this is their official university podcast, the marketing and communications teams are able to manage the show from start to finish, meaning the branding is consistent throughout, and social content is created on a regular basis. This helps their audience grow on all platforms.Work hand-in-hand with your PR team to cross-promote your podcast episodes.When pitching to media outlets, Purdue’s PR team embeds any relevant podcast clips into their articles to provide an audio version of the story they’re trying to tell. Not only does this give the reader and media outlets a more personal perspective on the story, but it also increases your podcast reach and downloads.Growth can explode when guests share your show.It’s important to give your guests a nicely packaged set of assets they can use to promote your podcast episodes. This should include graphics, videos, show notes, and even social copy. Make it as easy as possible for them to share your content in order to increase your podcast’s reach within their audience.The ultimate success metric is getting positive podcast feedback from people outside the Purdue community.When Kate hears compliments on Purdue’s podcast from people who went to other schools (even rival schools), that’s when she knows the show is a true success. Those people aren’t tied to Purdue, they didn’t drink the Kool-Aid, yet they still enjoy listening to the podcast and find value in it. That’s the ultimate goal and measure of success.It’s not too late to start a podcast.It may seem like there’s an overabundance of podcasts out there and your window to start a new one may be closing. But Kate mentioned out of the millions of podcasts in production, only 322,000 are active. Many people and brands realize how much work goes into creating and sustaining a show and give up after a season, or even after 10 episodes. So if you’re thinking of getting into podcasting as a marketing or brand play, know that it’s not too late.Having 100 people listen to your podcast for 30 minutes is more impactful than 500 website impressions.The power of audio is undeniable. Having 100 people listen to your branded podcast content for 30 to 45 minutes and truly immersing themselves in your brand has a much larger emotional impact than 500 website visits. A podcast allows listeners to spend quality time with your brand, which is incomparable to a 2-minute article read. This allows you to build trust and brand affinity.Mentions Riverside Descript Wavve Headliner

40mins

11 May 2022

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Gucci Reigns At the Met Gala: Stylists Kate Young, Elizabeth Stewart and Wayman & Micah

Shut Up Evan

It's SHUT UP EVAN x GUCCI, baby. In a very special episode presented in collaboration with the storied Italian fashion house, ERK is interviewing four of the biggest stylists in Hollywood, responsible for three of the best looks at the 2022 Met Gala: Kate Young, who styled Dakota Johnson, Elizabeth Stewart, who styled Jessica Chastain, and Wayman Bannerman and Micah McDonald, who styled Jodie Turner-Smith. We'll chat with them about what they love most about the Met Gala, how the creative process plays out and why they each knew Gucci was the right fit for this year's Gilded Glamour-themed affair.Host: Evan Ross KatzEditor: Sophia AsmuthShow links:Get bonus content by joining us on Patreon http://patreon.com/shutupevanEvan Ross Katz on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/evanrosskatz/See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

38mins

10 May 2022

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Dakota Johnson, Sophie Turner, and Julianne Moore's Stylist, Kate Young, on Met Gala Looks and History

Who What Wear with Hillary Kerr

Kate Young is a legendary and prolific stylist with clients such as Selena Gomez and Natalie Portman. She’s also a Met Gala expert, having dressed celebrities for over a decade for the event, and she even worked it herself back in her days as an editor at Vogue. Young is here to break down all things Met Gala, including how she interpreted this year’s theme and a look at how she styled Dakota Johnson (Gucci), Julianne Moore (Tom Ford), and Sophie Turner (Louis Vuitton) for the event.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

33mins

4 May 2022

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Who What Wear with Hillary Kerr: Dakota Johnson, Sophie Turner, and Julianne Moore's Stylist, Kate Young, on Met Gala Looks and History

Second Life

Kate Young is a legendary and prolific stylist with clients such as Selena Gomez and Natalie Portman. She’s also a Met Gala expert, having dressed celebrities for over a decade for the event, and she even worked it herself back in her days as an editor at Vogue. Young is here to break down all things Met Gala, including how she interpreted this year’s theme and a look at how she styled Dakota Johnson (Gucci), Julianne Moore (Tom Ford), and Sophie Turner (Louis Vuitton) for the event.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

33mins

4 May 2022

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May 4, 2022 Luca Ghini, Charlotte Turner Smith, Maud Grieve, Margaret Leland Goldsmith, The Little Library Year by Kate Young, and Gail Carriger

The Daily Gardener

Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events Today is Bird Day!   1556 Death of Luca Ghini ("Gee-nee"), Italian physician and botanist.  Luca is remembered for creating the first recorded herbarium and the first botanical garden in Pisa, Italy. Historical accounts indicate he was an outstanding and beloved botany teacher at the university in Bologna. By 1527, Luca was giving lectures on medicinal plants and essentially teaching what is considered the first official university-level classes on botany. Luca was also the first to press flowers to create a plant collection. The English botanist William Withering wrote about flower pressing in the 1770s. Luca used his pressed and dried plants the same way future botanists would - he used them to study when fresh or live specimens were not available. In this way, he could teach his students, and they could use the dried specimens to continue their studies all year long. Luca mentored his students - taking them on field trips and encouraging them to learn all about plants. And if Luca Ghini seems an obscure character in botanical history, it's because he didn't publish anything. He was too busy interacting with his botanist peers and teaching his students - through whom he left a lasting legacy.   1749 Birth of Charlotte Turner Smith, English novelist, and Romantic poet. She revived the English sonnet, was an early Gothic fiction writer and helped establish the genre. She also wrote about sensibility in her political novels. Charlotte's novels, Emmeline (1788) and Desmond (1792), reflect womanly hope and disenfranchisement with eighteenth-century Common Law. Charlotte once wrote, Oh, Hope! thou soother sweet of human woes! How shall I lure thee to my haunts forlorn! For me wilt thou renew the withered rose, And clear my painful path of pointed thorn?   And here is an excerpt of Charlotte's poem called Written at the Close of Spring. The garlands fade that Spring so lately wove, Each simple flow’r, which she had nurs’d in dew, Anemones that spangled every grove, The primrose wan, and harebell, mildly blue. No more shall violets linger in the dell, Or purple orchis variegate the plain, Till Spring again shall call forth every bell, And dress with humid hands her wreaths again. Ah, poor Humanity! so frail, so fair, Are the fond visions of thy early day, Another May new buds and flow’rs shall bring; Ah! Why has Happiness—no second Spring?   1858 Birth of Sophie Emma Magdalene Grieve (pen name Mrs. Grieve), English writer and herbalist. Her friends called her Maud.  In addition to her writing, Maud founded an Herb School and Farm in England. She was a Fellow of the Royal Horticultural Society, President of the British Guild of Herb Growers, and a Fellow of the British Science Guild. Today, Maud is best remembered for her book, A Modern Herbal (1931). Maud's Herbal is still regarded as one of the best herbals ever written. She provided detailed information about each herb she profiled, including "Medicinal Actions and Uses." Here's a sampling of her information. Purple Loosestrife: As an eyewash this invasive herb is superior to Eyebright for preserving the sight and curing sore eyes. Chives: Useful for cutting up and mixing with the food of newly-hatched turkeys. Borage: May be regarded as a garden escape. (A delicate way of saying it is invasive.) Valerian: A powerful nervine, stimulant, carminative, and anti-spasmodic. The drug allays pain and promotes sleep. It is of especial use and benefit to those suffering from nervous overstrain…During the recent War (WWI), when air-raids were a serious strain on the nerves of civilian men and women, valerian…proved wonderfully efficacious, preventing or minimizing serious results. Garlic: There is a Mohammedan legend that when Satan stepped out from the Garden of Eden after the fall of man, Garlick sprang up from the spot where he placed his left foot and Onion from that where his right foot touched. Moneywort: We are told by old writers that this herb was not only used by man, but that if serpents hurt or wounded themselves, they turned to this plant for healing, and so it was sometimes called 'Serpentaria'. Agrimony or Church-Steeple: the small root is sweet-scented, especially in spring. Lemon: It is probable that the lemon is the most valuable of all fruit for preserving health. English Summers: ‘It has been said, with some truth, that our English summer is not here until the Elder is fully in flower, and that it ends when the berries are ripe."   1894 Birth of Margaret Leland Goldsmith, American journalist, historical novelist, and translator. In June of 1936, in “The Perils of Gardening” for Scribner’s Magazine, she wrote: For years I have avoided magenta with feverish zest.  I do not like it.  It kills my henna reds.  It fights with the cedar brown of my cottage.  Yet every year something of that hue intrudes.  If it isn’t Sweet William reverting to type, it is a red phlox gone decadent.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation The Little Library Year by Kate Young This book came out in 2020, the perfect time because it was right at the start of the pandemic.  The subtitle is Recipes and Reading to Suit Each Season. Oh, I cannot tell you how long I've been waiting to share this book. It is such a treat. The publisher does a great job of succinctly telling you about Kate's book. The Little Library Year takes you through a full 12 months in award-winning food writer Kate Young's kitchen. Here are frugal, January meals enjoyed alone with a classic comfort read. As well as summer feasts to be eaten outdoors with the perfect beach read in hand. Beautifully photographed throughout. The Little Library Year is full of delicious seasonal recipes,  menus And reading recommendations - (which is one of the reasons why I absolutely squealed when I first found out about Kate's book.)   Now you'll be happy to know that the cover is beautiful. It truly is a cover for a gardener because she's got a little desk with a little coffee mug, and then she's got potted herbs stacked on top of books. Then, there's a little blue journal with a pen resting on top. The herbs include Pineapple Sage, Thyme, and of course, Rosemary.  It is just perfect. Now Diana Henry's review of this book is right on the cover. She writes Recipes you long to cook. Suggestions for books. You want to read a sense of place and season and takes of life lived thoughtfully and well. This is a very special book written with great generosity She is so right. Now I wanted to share this little excerpt from Kate about how she broke down the seasons for her book. She writes, I have broken the year into six parts. Those long winter nights in January and February, the first signs of spring in March and April, the green months of may and June when spring is in abundance, the height of summer in July and August, the weeks when the leaves start to turn in September and October. And then the final months of the year, as the days grow short.   And then she writes, I have written The Little Library Year. as a literary and culinary almanac -a celebration of each and every season and a way to capture the year in books and food.And isn't that fantastic? Well, you really should treat yourself to this book, and then if you fall in love with Kate Young, check out her author page because she has many, many delightful books. She's a great writer - one of my favorites. This book is 336 pages of garden-fresh recipes, life stories, and of course, books, books, books. You can get a copy of The Little Library Year by Kate young and support the shell using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $20, but you'll need to hurry because those used copies at that price will go quickly. You can get a copy of The Little Library Year by Kate Young and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $21.   Botanic Spark 1976 Birth of Gail Carriger (Gail "Care-ah-gurr") (the pen name of Tofa Borregaard), American New York Times bestselling author of steampunk fiction and an archaeologist. In her book, Poison or Protect, the first in the Delightfully Deadly series, a sexy assassin, a Scotsman, and two lobsters attend a Victorian house party in a charming story of love and espionage. Gail introduces us to her main character this way: The assassin is Lady Preshea Villentia ("Preh-sha Vill-in-sha"), who has four dead husbands and a nasty reputation. Fortunately, she looks fabulous in black. What society doesn’t know is that all her husbands were marked for death by Preshea’s employer. And Preshea has one final assignment. In the book, Lady Violet says, "We do not suit. You have no genuine interest in botany!” Lady Violet practically yelled her final conclusion. This was the biggest sin of them all.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

17mins

4 May 2022

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Episode 41 - Kate Young: Customer-Centric Creativity

The Common Creative

Season 4 we're back! Joining us to kick off the season is Kate Young, Head of Customer Centricity & Capability at ANZ. Having been with the banking group for over five years, Kate is driving cultural change at ANZ by putting customers at the heart of all her work. She is passionate about bringing together cross-functional, enterprising purposeful teams using a customer-centric perspective.  Join us for a fascinating episode all about consumer behaviour, AI and what a day in the life might look like in 2024... Links: Kate Young: https://www.linkedin.com/in/youngkate1/ Two Common Creatives: https://www.twocommoncreatives.com/ Ideas & Stories that Matter: https://www.twocommoncreatives.com/workshopSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

31mins

14 Mar 2022

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Can Eating Plants Raise Your Vibe? w/ Kate Young, Holistic Nutritionist

Sacred Beauty™ Lifestyle

Indeed, they can and do. In this episode, Kate Young, a Holistic Nutritionist, shares how pure plant foods measure at a higher frequency than processed foods.  She also shares that when we eat high-frequency foods such as fresh organic fruits and vegetables, it raises our energetic quality, in turn, we take the elevation. You really ARE what you eat.  *******************************************************************************Guest Information: To learn more about Kate Young click here.*******************************************************************************Show Info: Watch future episodes of the podcast on YouTube. Connect with the host Lisa Eddy: Website: SacredBeautyLifestyle.comInstagram: @IAmLisaEddySacred Beauty Collective: https://www.facebook.com/groups/sacredbeautycollectiveEmail: hello@sacredbeautylifestyle.com

45mins

8 Mar 2022

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Mona Lisa Smile with Kate Young

Sentimental Garbage

Mona Lisa Smile was a 2003 movie about women's education in the 1950s, and it was also the first Julia Roberts drama to spectacularly fail. We talk a lot about the negative reception to the film – in some cases, the negative reception from the cast itself. We discuss movies about education, and why no one ever seems to have quite the same high standards of filmmaking when it comes to making movies about men. We also talk about women who act against their own best interests, TERFs, evolving view points and whether Giselle would write a sex book. This one goes all over the shop but it's a really cosy and fun talk, just like the film! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

1hr 26mins

14 Oct 2021

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#35 - Stress-Free Parenting with Kate Young and Rochelle McFarlane

The Evolution of Mom

In this week's episode, I am so excited to introduce Kate and Rochelle! These two inspiring Mothers are all about stress-free parenting. Join me in this interview as we learn about modalities and approaches to mindset and parenting that we maybe never even knew we needed! Are you getting out of your comfort zone enough and diving into different areas that intrigue you? Ones that may support you as a woman, mother, and as someone who's excited to embrace new experiences when it comes to their growth? This is big on my to-do list lately and I will absolutely be diving into it more with these incredible women!Kate Young and Rochelle McFarlane are a dynamic duo here to share all about things that support Stress-Free Parenting.  Together they bring everything from Energy Medicine to Numbers to Nutrition and beyond to help you create the path of the future generation to land in more love.Learn more about Stree-Free Parenting:Web: https://espparent.ca/FB: https://www.facebook.com/ESPPARENTTwitter: https://twitter.com/espparentIG: https://www.instagram.com/espparent/Join us at the Mom's Full Moon 3 Day Retreat, click the link to claim your spot: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/moms-full-moon-3-day-retreat-tickets-165222782791Connect with Amy Lenius:IG: https://www.instagram.com/amylenius/https://linktr.ee/AmyLenius1I would love and appreciate it if you follow The Evolution of Mom on Apple podcast; a 5-star rating would be amazing, and share this with your girlfriends or anyone you think needs to hear that SHE is incredible, beautiful, and powerful!

48mins

20 Sep 2021

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