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Kris Faafoi

20 Podcast Episodes

Latest 14 May 2022 | Updated Daily

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Anne Daniels - Did Minister Kris Faafoi really contact NZ Nurses Organisation?

Tova

The government has made a mess of its immigration reforms - neglecting to include nurses and midwives on its green list for fast tracked residency.  Yesterday we spoke to NZ Nurses Organisation head Anne Daniels who told us nurses hadn’t been consulted..  The Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi came on the show immediately after her and said categorically that nurses had been consulted... then that they’d maybe hadn't been! To try get clarity on this we’re going back to Anne Daniels.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

5mins

13 May 2022

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Kris Faafoi: Immigration Minister on border policy changes and visa requirements

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

The Government has announced our border will fully reopen on the 31st of july - students can come back, cruise ships can come back and pre-departure tests will eventually go.The announcement came with big immigration changes. There will be a green list of hard to fill skill roles that we will prioritise visas for, a reworked accredited employer work visa with new rules around having to pay workers a wage requirement of at least $28 and apparently sector-specific agreements to support a shift away from low-skilled migrant labour.Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi joined Mike Hosking.LISTEN ABOVE

8mins

11 May 2022

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Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi

Tova

In an attempt to attract the best and brightest and keep the country’s lights on in the face of an inevitable brain drain the government has announced major immigration reforms Workers who fill critical gaps have been delivered an almighty incentive to choose New Zealand over other countries - they can go straight to residency  But nurses and midwives - who represent some of the most critical gaps in our health workforce have been relegated to the b-list - they still have to live and work in New Zealand for two years before residency’s an option See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

10mins

11 May 2022

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Kris Faafoi: This is vastly an improvement on the previous regime

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

The Immigration Minister is talking up shorter visa processing times. The Government's announced a raft of immigration changes – including speedy pathways to residency for highly skilled workers, and the border fully re-opening from August. Kris Faafoi says the system is moving from paper-based to online. He told Heather du Plessis-Allan the Accredited Employer Work Visa should only take about 30 days. “From the employer doing the job check and us doing the migrant check, that is vastly an improvement on the previous regime which is about 50 or 60 days.” LISTEN ABOVE

9mins

11 May 2022

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Kris Faafoi: Not hitting refugee settlement allowance is not the government's fault

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

The Immigration Minister's defending the Government's refugee record. It comes as the Australian Government has finally agreed to let New Zealand settle up to 150 of its refugees a year... for three years. It's part of New Zealand's annual 15-hundred refugees resettlement allowance, an allowance that hasn't been met for two years. But Kris Faafoi told Andrew Dickens that's not the Government's fault. “Absolutely brought in as many as we can, and then, as I say, the UN powered down its process around refugees significantly.” LISTEN ABOVE

4mins

24 Mar 2022

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Kris Faafoi: It will allow Ukrainian refugees to work and study here in NZ

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Ukrainians offered a safe haven in New Zealand under a new visa offer – will not receive financial aid as refugees.  The Government has announced a Special Ukraine Policy – lasting for one year from today. It lets Ukrainian-born New Zealand citizens and residents sponsor family members into a two-year visa. It's expected to affect about four-thousand people.  Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi told Andrew Dickens they are not included in our refugee quota. “It will allow those of working age to work, to support themselves, those who are under 18, to use the education system.” LISTEN ABOVE

4mins

15 Mar 2022

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Kris Faafoi: Broadcasting Minister says he wants a diverse media environment following RNZ/TVNZ merger announcement

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

The Broadcasting Minister wants a diverse media environment.  The TVNZ-RNZ merger is due to be open for business in July next year.   Kris Faafoi, himself a former TVNZ journalist, says the new entity will have editorial independence and a public media focus.  He told Mike Hosking he doesn't want the merger to completely dominate the market. “Having that number of media companies in New Zealand, while it is a small market is really important to keep each other honest and I think it is important for the commercial market too.” LISTEN ABOVE

5mins

10 Mar 2022

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Broadcasting minister Kris Faafoi on funding NZ journalism

The Fold

This week on The Fold, Duncan Greive talks to broadcasting and media minister Kris Faafoi about funding journalism, putting the audience first and a public media merger. We get to talk with a lot of people in the centre of New Zealand's media industry on this podcast, now we speak to the man representing the media in the Beehive. Kris Faafoi took over the broadcasting and media portfolio after the resignation of Claire Curran in 2018. Duncan Greive talks with the minister on this episode of The Fold about taking up the portfolio and the work he's done in the media industry since.They talk about Māori and Pasefika representation, the public interest journalism fund and the proposed RNZ/TVNZ merger. Faafoi also talks about media consumption and the rapid shift from linear television to on demand and international online offerings that are now taking over viewing habits. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

47mins

11 Apr 2021

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Kris Faafoi: Government to let in 2000 fruit pickers from Pacific

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

Two thousand workers from the Pacific will come to New Zealand early next year to pick fruit for the horticulture and wine industries.Their arrival is hoped to cover a huge hole in the labour force and avert what many growers have been calling a crisis.But there are Government conditions to the deal.Employers will have to pay the workers a living wage of $22.10 an hour, pay them 30 hours' a week while they're in managed isolation for 14 days, and cover their isolation costs - estimated at $4472 a worker.The deal was announced this morning by Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi and Agriculture Minister Damien O'Connor.Horticulture NZ chief executive Mike Chapman welcomed it but warned about possible labour shortages for the spring 2021 and harvest 2022 seasons.Praise from growers"While the timing of the Government's decision means that spring and early summer crops have missed out, growers across the country are relieved that some of the essential workers needed from low-Covid-risk Pacific countries are being let in," Chapman said.The workers will be granted a border exception as Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) workers, and will fly in between mid-January and March. The staggered arrivals are aimed at continuing to have MIQ spaces for returning Kiwis.Where the workers fly in from is still to be determined but, to qualify, the country needs an agreed plan to take back all of their RSE workers - not just those in the 2000-strong cohort - when the 2020/21 season ends.New Zealand Winegrowers says it "warmly welcomes" the Government announcement.Chief executive Philip Gregan said: "We have been working constructively with the Government to find a solution that balances our industry's need for skilled workers to complete time sensitive vineyard operations - against the high demand from Kiwis for places in managed isolation and quarantine."Gregan said the industry employed up to 8000 workers at its peak.Despite their efforts to recruit workers in New Zealand, however, he said: "The projected shortage of workers has been a real concern as we edge closer to next year's harvest and plan for the critical winter pruning."Horticulture and wine exports were worth $6.5 billion in the last financial year, with the sector employing about 38,300 New Zealanders, mainly in the regions.But growers have been crying out for more workers. There are normally about 14,400 RSE workers a year, but the pandemic and border restrictions have cut that workforce in half.Meanwhile, the number of unemployed people rose by 37,000 - totalling 151,000 - in the September quarter amid concerns that ripe crops were going to rot on the ground.The first of 2000 RSE workers from the Pacific will arrive in mid-January to help pick fruit. Photo / Warren BucklandThis morning the Government also announced incentives for Kiwis to work in the sector, including up to $200 in weekly accommodation support for those who move regions for this work and continue to have accommodation costs at home.Halfway through a contract that's at least six weeks long, Kiwi workers will also receive $500 from the Government, as well as a further $500 after completing the contract.O'Connor said the industries were also expected to make this work more attractive to Kiwis by addressing issues such as transport, accommodation, pay and training.He added that employers were also on notice that the workers were expected to be treated well and fully employed.There are about 6000 RSE workers from last year who have been allowed to stay and work this season, while those with Working Holiday visas expiring between October 2020 and March 2021 have been invited into the SSE (Supplementary Seasonal Employment) scheme to work in the sectors.Of 12,300 people with such Working Holiday visas, 1300 have been transferred to SSE.Those on current visitor, student and work visas can also apply for a SSE visa if they have a job offer from an eligible employer, or if the job is listed as ne...

3mins

26 Nov 2020

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'Most of the sector' comfortable with paying incoming RSE workers living wage - Kris Faafoi

Morning Report

Two thousand seasonal workers are set to land in New Zealand from January in a bid to plug the gap for fruit pickers across the country.The RSE workers will arrive from Pacific countries and quarantine in managed isolation facilities before starting work.Under the terms of the deal, employers must foot the bill for quarantine costs and are required to pay those arriving a living wage which is $22.10 an hour.The industry standard is currently the minimum wage at $18.90 an hour.The Minister of Immigration Kris Faafoi speaks to Corin Dann.

4mins

26 Nov 2020

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