OwlTail

Cover image of Paul Dickson

Paul Dickson

9 Podcast Episodes

Latest 1 May 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

Episode artwork

210. Paul Dickson

We Have Ways of Making You Talk

James Holland speaks to US historian Paul Dickson, writer of 'The Rise of the G.I. Army', about how the American Army was mobilized from scattered outposts two years before Pearl Harbor into the disciplined and mobile fighting force that helped win World War II.See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

48mins

25 Nov 2020

Episode artwork

Paul Dickson discusses the US Army in WWII in his military history book The Rise of the G.I. Army, 1940-1941 (Atlantic Monthly Press, 2020)

Military History Inside Out

Paul Dickson discusses the US Army in WWII Check out this book herehttps://amzn.to/3lBmxRW Interview Summary Paul Dickson has written numerous books on American history ranging from WWII, to baseball, to the space program. He recently completed a book on the development of the US Army just before the start of WWII. We spoke about the book and how the United States was able to create such a large army in [the] a short period of time from 1940 to 1941. (THE AUDIO PLAYER IS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE POST.) 0:45 – Paul talks about why he wrote a book about the development of the US Army before Pearl Harbor. He mentions the Louisiana maneuvers and MacArthur’s comments about the US Army. 5:18 – Paul talks about the layout of the book. He talks about Greenville Clark being instrumental in developing the US military. Greenville gained experience during WWI and wanted a draft for WWII. Greenville used Omar Bradley to lead a new OCS program. 13:17 – Paul talks about Marshall having to deal with low quality senior officers. He also mentions the development of Army films under Frank Capra. 16:03 – Paul talks about how they filled the ranks of middle grade officers. 17:18 – Paul talks about management of the budget and logistics for this newly expanded Army. He also talks about Eisenhower’s comments about training logistics in the US. 21:45 – Paul talks about a major portion of his book dealing with attempts to integrate the Army. 25:45 – Paul talks about the training this new army did. He mentions Piper Cub aircraft. He talks about citizen-soldiers. 29:07 – Paul talks about the resources he used for his research. He mentions the Eisenhower Library and Pritzker Library. 31:09 – Paul talks about how enjoyable it was to figure out the story of how the citizen Army was created. 35:25 – Paul talks about the planned enlistment times. He also explains why they started enriching flour during WWII. 40:40 – Paul talks about all the people who helped him prepare the book. 44:25 – Paul talks about how people felt abut the Korean War. 46:28 – Paul talks about what was done to keep morale up. He gives examples of how the GI Bill helped veterans. 50:13 – Paul talks about the US Army Air Corps. He talks about Jimmy Stewart being rejected and then working towards getting into the Army. He also talks about the Tuskeegee Airmen. 56:45 – Paul can be found at pauldicksonbooks.com, on facebook, and on twitter. Links of interest https://amzn.to/3lBmxRW https://groveatlantic.com/book/the-rise-of-the-gi-army-1940-1941/ http://www.pauldicksonbooks.com/ https://www.facebook.com/pages/Paul-Dickson/107581339271526 Contact Information For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me at www.warscholar.org, on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar and on Instagram @crisalvarezwarscholar. Or subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify Please see historyrabbithole.com for a list of my dozen or so blogs and podcasts. You’re sure to find something you like. Guests: Paul Dickson Host: Cris Alvarez Tags: American history, Atlantic Monthly Press, audio interviews, books, Paul Dickson, podcast, United States, wwii, Check out this book herehttps://amzn.to/3lBmxRW As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. The post Paul Dickson discusses the US Army in WWII in his military history book The Rise of the G.I. Army, 1940-1941 (Atlantic Monthly Press, 2020) appeared first on WarScholar.

58mins

12 Oct 2020

Similar People

Episode artwork

Printism UK Print Podcast with Paul Dickson

Printism Media UK Print Chat

Paul Dickson is the publisher and designer of Mill Magazine, a free, lifestyle magazine promoting the people and businesses of Renfrewshire. Despite the many challenges facing it, Mill magazine is positively thriving and is going from strength to strength at a time when the publishing industry in the UK is struggling. Through clever use of local collaboration and engagement, social media and the printed copies of the magazine, Paul has grown the magazine over the last 10 editions into a real community champion for the area.  This podcast is a real positive, good news story, on the effects well put together printed materials can have on a local community and beyond.  

28mins

9 Sep 2020

Episode artwork

The ebb and flow of creating a charity | Paul Dickson

Impact Sessions

In this wide ranging discussion with, Chief Go Getter, Paul Dickson from OKE Charity. We hear about his journey towards OKE, how it came about and some of his learnings along the way.  This episode was originally recorded nearly a year now, so some of the event references are not up to date. But the content and chat is still relevant.  https://www.oke.org.nz/--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/andy-crowe1/message

45mins

11 Oct 2019

Most Popular

Episode artwork

E25: Paul Dickson

ELECTRIC PEOPLE PODCAST

He's the one who started it all. Tune in to hear what it took to build Vivint Solar into the dominant business it is today. Paul provides incredible insights and tips for success. Don't miss this one.

1hr 7mins

30 Aug 2019

Episode artwork

Episode 20: Paul Dickson + Authoring baseball's stories

SABRcast with Rob Neyer

On this week's episode of SABRcast, Rob Neyer chats with author Paul Dickson about his long career as a writer before he tackled the subject of baseball, and the impacts he's made on the catalog of baseball literature. Then, as Rob and Scott discuss who won the weekend, a tongue-and-cheek wish list of the most off the beaten path destinations for an MLB road show. For show notes, extra content, and a list of what Rob's reading, visit the SABRcast website at https://sabr.org/sabrcastEpisode 20: Paul Dickson + Authoring baseball's stories

1hr 13mins

12 Aug 2019

Episode artwork

Paul Dickson, “Bill Veeck: Baseball’s Greatest Maverick” (Walker & Company, 2012)

New Books in Sports

Mention the name Bill Veeck to a baseball fan and what will likely come to mind is the back-and-white image of three-foot, seven-inch Eddie Gaedel at the plate of a Major League game, swimming in his St. Louis Browns uniform, the opposing catcher having just caught a pitch well over... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sports

1hr 3mins

30 Apr 2012

Episode artwork

Paul Dickson, “Bill Veeck: Baseball’s Greatest Maverick” (Walker & Company, 2012)

New Books in Biography

Mention the name Bill Veeck to a baseball fan and what will likely come to mind is the back-and-white image of three-foot, seven-inch Eddie Gaedel at the plate of a Major League game, swimming in his St. Louis Browns uniform, the opposing catcher having just caught a pitch well over his head. Gaedel’s sole appearance for the Browns in 1951 is part of the lore of baseball, and it is often cited as the prime example of Veeck’s antics and his irreverence as a team owner.  As owner of the Browns, the Cleveland Indians, and the Chicago White Sox, as well as owner of the minor-league Milwaukee Brewers and executive for the Chicago Cubs, Veeck was famous–and infamous–for his promotions and publicity stunts. Veeck wanted to bring people to the ballpark, and he was willing to try any scheme to do that: giving away 100 dollar coins frozen in a block of ice, serving free breakfast cereal for morning games, inviting fans to bring their detested disco records for an on-field demolition, or sending a midget into a Major League game. Paul Dickson‘s new biography of the owner, Bill Veeck: Baseball’s Greatest Maverick (Walker & Company, 2012), shows that there was far more to Veeck than Gaedel at the bat, Disco Demolition Night, or any other promotional stunt. Veeck had a genuine interest in serving his customers, in making a day at the ballpark an enjoyable experience for the whole family. The owners of the time judged his schemes as insults to the game. Even more than that, they resented Veeck’s willingness to mix with fans at the stadium gate and in the bleacher seats. Eventually, baseball’s owners came to recognize the wisdom of this so-called showman. The fan-friendly ballpark experience of today owes much to Bill Veeck’s innovations, from wider seats and widely available restrooms to specialty foods and promotional giveaways. At the very least, Veeck should be remembered for directing the renovations of Wrigley Field in 1936-37, a project that included building a brick wall in the outfield and planting ivy at its base (the Chinese Elms planted by the scoreboard didn’t survive the famous winds at the North Side park).But perhaps Veeck’s greatest legacy was his commitment to the integration of baseball. As Paul explains in the book and the interview, Veeck had a bold plan to introduce black players into the Major Leagues already in 1942. League officials, however, intervened to scuttle the plan. Five years later, just eleven weeks after Jackie Robinson first stepped onto the field for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Veeck signed Larry Doby to the Cleveland Indians, making him the first black player in the American League. The following year, he signed the legendary pitcher of the Negro Leagues, Satchel Paige. And in 1949, Cleveland had 11 black and Latino players in spring training as well as African Americans working in the front office, the stadium staff, and the grounds crew. Veeck was indeed a maverick and a showman, but he was also a man of principle and resolve. Not many owners of sports teams merit such a description. Nor could many owners be the subject of such an illuminating and entertaining biography. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

1hr 3mins

30 Apr 2012

Episode artwork

Paul Dickson, “Bill Veeck: Baseball’s Greatest Maverick” (Walker & Company, 2012)

New Books in American Studies

Mention the name Bill Veeck to a baseball fan and what will likely come to mind is the back-and-white image of three-foot, seven-inch Eddie Gaedel at the plate of a Major League game, swimming in his St. Louis Browns uniform, the opposing catcher having just caught a pitch well over his head. Gaedel’s sole appearance for the Browns in 1951 is part of the lore of baseball, and it is often cited as the prime example of Veeck’s antics and his irreverence as a team owner.  As owner of the Browns, the Cleveland Indians, and the Chicago White Sox, as well as owner of the minor-league Milwaukee Brewers and executive for the Chicago Cubs, Veeck was famous–and infamous–for his promotions and publicity stunts. Veeck wanted to bring people to the ballpark, and he was willing to try any scheme to do that: giving away 100 dollar coins frozen in a block of ice, serving free breakfast cereal for morning games, inviting fans to bring their detested disco records for an on-field demolition, or sending a midget into a Major League game. Paul Dickson‘s new biography of the owner, Bill Veeck: Baseball’s Greatest Maverick (Walker & Company, 2012), shows that there was far more to Veeck than Gaedel at the bat, Disco Demolition Night, or any other promotional stunt. Veeck had a genuine interest in serving his customers, in making a day at the ballpark an enjoyable experience for the whole family. The owners of the time judged his schemes as insults to the game. Even more than that, they resented Veeck’s willingness to mix with fans at the stadium gate and in the bleacher seats. Eventually, baseball’s owners came to recognize the wisdom of this so-called showman. The fan-friendly ballpark experience of today owes much to Bill Veeck’s innovations, from wider seats and widely available restrooms to specialty foods and promotional giveaways. At the very least, Veeck should be remembered for directing the renovations of Wrigley Field in 1936-37, a project that included building a brick wall in the outfield and planting ivy at its base (the Chinese Elms planted by the scoreboard didn’t survive the famous winds at the North Side park).But perhaps Veeck’s greatest legacy was his commitment to the integration of baseball. As Paul explains in the book and the interview, Veeck had a bold plan to introduce black players into the Major Leagues already in 1942. League officials, however, intervened to scuttle the plan. Five years later, just eleven weeks after Jackie Robinson first stepped onto the field for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Veeck signed Larry Doby to the Cleveland Indians, making him the first black player in the American League. The following year, he signed the legendary pitcher of the Negro Leagues, Satchel Paige. And in 1949, Cleveland had 11 black and Latino players in spring training as well as African Americans working in the front office, the stadium staff, and the grounds crew. Veeck was indeed a maverick and a showman, but he was also a man of principle and resolve. Not many owners of sports teams merit such a description. Nor could many owners be the subject of such an illuminating and entertaining biography. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr 3mins

30 Apr 2012