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Eugene Thacker

10 Podcast Episodes

Latest 3 Feb 2023 | Updated Daily

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757 Cosmic Pessimism 2 by Eugene Thacker

Immediatism

Immediatism.com My other podcast, PointingTexts.org Feedback and requests to Cory@Immediatism.com, and your comment may be shared in a future episode. Donate

17mins

29 Jan 2022

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756 Cosmic Pessimism 1 by Eugene Thacker

Immediatism

Immediatism.com My other podcast, PointingTexts.org Feedback and requests to Cory@Immediatism.com, and your comment may be shared in a future episode. Donate

26mins

26 Jan 2022

Similar People

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754 Remote: The Forgetting of the World by Eugene Thacker

Immediatism

This essay is from the book Dark Nights of the Universe, part of the Novo Pan Klub series, from [Name] publisher. Video that the book images come from (a reading of the essay/poem). Immediatism.com My other podcast, PointingTexts.org Feedback and requests to Cory@Immediatism.com, and your comment may be shared in a future episode. Donate

35mins

24 Jan 2022

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753 After Life by Eugene Thacker

Immediatism

This essay is from the book After Life from The University of Chicago Press. Immediatism.com My other podcast, PointingTexts.org Feedback and requests to Cory@Immediatism.com, and your comment may be shared in a future episode. Donate

31mins

24 Jan 2022

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752 Clouds of Unknowing by Eugene Thacker

Immediatism

This essay is from the book In The Dust of This Planet (Horror of Philosophy Vol. 1) from Zero Books. Immediatism.com My other podcast, PointingTexts.org Feedback and requests to Cory@Immediatism.com, and your comment may be shared in a future episode. Donate

25mins

23 Jan 2022

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Close Reed #8: Eugene Thacker - In the Dust of this Planet

The Reeds Podcast

Damon invites fellow Johnnie, friend, and philosophy grad student Ben Crispell on the program to talk about the horror of philosophy as explored in Eugene Thacker's In the Dust of this Planet. The conversation contains, much like the book itself, a combination of concept-exploring, cultural observations and copious references, from HP Lovecraft to Heidegger to monster movies. Through the lens of the horror genre (broadly defined), Thacker blends philosophical, theological, and pop-cultural elements to address the apocalyptic and existential threats which seem to characterize our modern world.  "The world is increasingly unthinkable - a world of planetary disasters, emerging pandemics, tectonic shifts, strange weather, oil-drenched seascapes, and the furtive, always-looming threat of extinction. In spite of our daily concerns, wants, and desires, it is increasingly difficult to comprehend the world in which we live and of which we are a part. To confront this idea is to confront an absolute limit to our ability to adequately understand the world at all - an idea that has been a central motif of the horror genre for some time." 

1hr 5mins

26 Feb 2021

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Ep. 15: Eugene Thacker's "Infinite Resignation" / Is BLR a pessimistic view?

Becoming Other

Reading excerpts from thinker and philosopher Eugene Thacker's latest work, "Infinite Resignation." Thacker is a professor at the New School in NYC, and in his essay "On Pessimism" is composed of aphorisms / fragments which explore the concept. You can purchase the book here: https://tinyurl.com/y6d6k2wzI also share some thoughts about how the perspective of pessimism relates to Beyond Left & Right (BLR) philosophy.Intro/Outro song is my own composition, except for the drum track, which comes from https://www.drumdrops.com/. Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/becomeother

43mins

20 Feb 2019

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Ep. 60 – Eugene Thacker, In the Dust of This Planet: Horror of Philosophy

Always Already Podcast, a critical theory podcast

In what could be their first trio podcast, co-hosts James, Emily, and B tarry with the Preface and a Chapter titled “Occult Philosophy” from Eugene Thacker’s In the Dust of this Planet: Horror of Philosophy, vol. 1. Before launching in, James shares some good news, and B befriends a finger monster. The team was at first hesitant about the text. But why? Perhaps they were a bit bewildered by Thacker’s arguments concerning the history of the philosophical “in-itself”? Or the world-for-us? Or their overall relationship to the horror genre? Was this Thacker’s critique of the Western canon? Or is Thacker’s archive unknowingly neo-colonial?  Does the archive show us the limits of knowledge (as the promise of horror as the fear of the unknown forebodes) or does it reproduce “the ruse of [Western] reason” by another name and through another’s pen? But why the Hell is post-colonial and anti-racist critique the “easy” critique anyway? Join and listen as all three of our co-hosts discuss one of the many purposes and pitfalls of academic publishing, the perils of public anti-intellectualism, and the dynamism of genres.Support us on Patreon to help us upgrade our recording equipment, potentially provide episode transcripts, and more – plus, you may have the chance to jump your request to the top of the request queue. Thanks to Bağlan for requesting Thacker. Requests for texts for us to discuss? Dreams for us to interpret? Advice questions for us to answer? Email us at alwaysalreadypodcast AT gmail DOT com. Subscribe on iTunes. Follow us on Twitter. Like our Facebook page. RSS feed here. Thanks to Bad Infinity for the intro music, “Post Digital,” from their new album FutureCommons; always already thanks to B for the outro music. For the mp3 of the episode click here.https://alwaysalreadypodcast.files.wordpress.com/2018/12/Thacker.mp3 Links: In the Dust…, at Zero Books A video analysis of Twin Peaks from the perspective of Thacker’s work, produced by Zero Books Thacker on WNYC’s Radiolab podcast Thacker’s Horror of Philosophy series at Zero Books

27 Dec 2018

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Eugene Thacker, “Horror of Philosophy” (Zero Book, 2011-2015)

New Books in Critical Theory

Eugene Thacker‘s wonderful Horror of Philosophy series includes three books – In the Dust of this Planet (Zero Books, 2011), Starry Speculative Corpse (Zero Books, 2015), and Tentacles Longer than Night (Zero Books, 2015) – that collectively explore the relationship between philosophy (especially as it overlaps with demonology, occultism, and mysticism) and horror (especially of the supernatural sort). Each book takes on a particular problematic using a particular form from the history of philosophy, from the quaestio, lectio, and disputatio of medieval scholarship, to shorter aphoristic prose, to productive “mis-readings” of works of horror as philosophical texts and vice versa. Taken together, the books thoughtfully model the possibilities born of a comparative scholarly approach that creates conversations among works that might not ordinarily be juxtaposed in the same work: like Nishitani, Kant, Yohji Yamamoto, and Fludd; or Argento, Dante, and Lautramont. Though they explore topics like darkness, pessimism, vampiric cephalopods, and “black tentacular voids,” these books vibrate with life and offer consistent and shining inspiration for the careful reader. Anyone interested in philosophy, theology, modern literature and cinema, literatures on life and death, the history of horror…or really, anyone at all who appreciates thoughtful writing in any form should grab them – grab all of them! – and sit somewhere comfy, and prepare to read, reflect, and enjoy.For Thacker’s brand-new book Cosmic Pessimism (published by Univocal with a super-groovy black-on-black cover) go here. Thacker is co-teaching a course with Simon Critchley on “Mysticism” at the New School for Social Research this fall 2015. You can check out the description here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

1hr 8mins

28 Sep 2015

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Eugene Thacker, “Horror of Philosophy” (Zero Book, 2011-2015)

NBN Seminar

Eugene Thacker‘s wonderful Horror of Philosophy series includes three books – In the Dust of this Planet (Zero Books, 2011), Starry Speculative Corpse (Zero Books, 2015), and Tentacles Longer than Night (Zero Books, 2015) – that collectively explore the relationship between philosophy (especially as it overlaps with demonology, occultism, and mysticism) and horror (especially of the supernatural sort). Each book takes on a particular problematic using a particular form from the history of philosophy, from the quaestio, lectio, and disputatio of medieval scholarship, to shorter aphoristic prose, to productive “mis-readings” of works of horror as philosophical texts and vice versa. Taken together, the books thoughtfully model the possibilities born of a comparative scholarly approach that creates conversations among works that might not ordinarily be juxtaposed in the same work: like Nishitani, Kant, Yohji Yamamoto, and Fludd; or Argento, Dante, and Lautramont. Though they explore topics like darkness, pessimism, vampiric cephalopods, and “black tentacular voids,” these books vibrate with life and offer consistent and shining inspiration for the careful reader. Anyone interested in philosophy, theology, modern literature and cinema, literatures on life and death, the history of horror…or really, anyone at all who appreciates thoughtful writing in any form should grab them – grab all of them! – and sit somewhere comfy, and prepare to read, reflect, and enjoy.For Thacker’s brand-new book Cosmic Pessimism (published by Univocal with a super-groovy black-on-black cover) go here. Thacker is co-teaching a course with Simon Critchley on “Mysticism” at the New School for Social Research this fall 2015. You can check out the description here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr 8mins

28 Sep 2015