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Stephen Solomon

7 Podcast Episodes

Latest 24 Sep 2022 | Updated Daily

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Stephen Solomon from Imaginarium

Con Job

On this weeks special episode Ryan and Alexa sit down for an interview with one of the head cheeses at Imaginarium, Stephen Solomon. We talk about Tampa Bay and Atlanta Comic Con, the buzz from fans and vendors about attending and the fate of Indiana Comic Con for 2020. Check it out and let’s us know your thoughts.

42mins

29 May 2020

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Should Fire Engines Really Be Red? with Dr. Stephen Solomon

Code 3 - The Firefighters' Podcast

What color is a fire engine? Well, if you’re a fan of traditional fire helmets, then I assume you’d prefer your apparatus to be red. You know, fire engine red. But for years, since the 1970s, there’s been that nagging question of conspicuity. What color is safest? What color do drivers see most readily? In today’s world of highly distracted drivers, does color matter? My guest is Dr. Stephen Solomon. He’s taken a look at the data that’s been collected and has some answers. Stephen is an optometrist. He’s also a veteran firefighter, with 17 years as a captain, and 17 years as a fire commissioner. He is a hazmat tech and TRT supervisor in Tioga County, New York. He’s worked on projects to make fire apparatus safer. And you know that reflective and fluorescent trim on your turnouts? He worked with 3M to develop that.

19mins

5 Aug 2019

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Free Speech 62: Stephen Solomon--Raucous, Robust, and Radical: The Founders and Free Speech

Think About It

Where does our country's deep commitment to free speech come from? Stephen Solomon researched the range of political speech before the adoption of our Constitution and the Bill of Rights to chronicle years of robust and often controversial speech. Solomon is the author of Revolutionary Dissent: How the Founding Generation Created the Freedom of Speech, Associate Director of NYU's Journalism Institute, and the founding director of the firstamendmentwatch website.  Uli Baer teaches literature and photography as University Professor at New York University. A recipient of Guggenheim, Getty and Humboldt awards, in addition to hosting "Speaking of…” he hosts (with Caroline Weber) the podcast "The Proust Questionnaire” and is Editorial Director at Warbler Press. Email ucb1@nyu.edu; Twitter @UliBaer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr

18 May 2019

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Episode 24 – Expert Opinion: Stephen Solomon part two - The Sedition Act

Clear and Present Danger - A history of free speech

In 1787, the newly authored U.S. Constitution was sent out to the states for ratification. Despite fierce objections from Anti-Federalists, the Constitution did not include a bill of rights protecting freedom of speech and the press. The Anti-Federalist newspaper the Independent Gazetteer published an ironic comment on what the future of free speech would look like if the Constitution was ratified: Ah! what glorious days are coming; how I anticipate the brilliancy of the American court! … [H]ere is the president going in state to the senate house to confirm the law for the abolition of the liberty of the press. Men and brethren will not these things be so? Even though the Bill of Rights was adopted in 1791, the Independent Gazetteer’s withering sarcasm had been prophetic: On July 14, 1798, President John Adams signed the Sedition Act into law, making it a crime to “write, print, utter, or publish…any false, scandalous and malicious writing against the government of the United States, or either house of the Congress of the United States, or the President of the United States, with intent to defame…or to bring them…into contempt or disrepute; or to excite against them…the hatred of the good people of the United States.” A mere seven years after the adoption of the Bill of Rights and the First Amendment’s promise that “Congress shall make no law…abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press,” Congress had done just that. The Sedition Act paved the way for the prosecution and imprisonment of both journalists, editors, politicians, and ordinary Americans engaging in political, satirical and symbolic speech. In part two of this conversation with NYU professor Stephen Solomon, we explore how the Americans who had championed freedom of speech as the “great bulwark of liberty” and thumbed their noses at English sedition laws in the lead up to the Revolution came to adopt their own sedition law. We discuss issues including: The deeply polarized political environment of the 1790s; The fiercely partisan attacks of both Federalist and Democratic-Republican newspapers on political opponents; How the Sedition Act differed from seditious libel under English common law; The arguments for and against the constitutionality of the Sedition Act; James Madison’s eloquent and elaborate defense of robust free speech protections; The congressman, journalists and ordinary Americans who were prosecuted and imprisoned for voicing their opinions; The prosecutorial zeal of Secretary of State Matthew Pickering and Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase (aka “Old Bacon Face”); The unintended consequences of the Sedition Act which strengthened Democratic-Republican newspapers and politicians and weakened Federalists; and Thomas Jefferson’s magnanimous inauguration speech. Marjorie Deane Professor of Journalism at New York University's Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute; teaches First Amendment law and is founding editor of First Amendment Watch, which covers current conflicts over freedom of expression. Author of Revolutionary Dissent: How the Founding Generation Created the Freedom of Speech.  Why have kings, emperors, and governments killed and imprisoned people to shut them up? And why have countless people risked death and imprisonment to express their beliefs? Jacob Mchangama guides you through the history of free speech from the trial of Socrates to the Great Firewall. You can subscribe and listen to Clear and Present Danger on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, YouTube, TuneIn, and Stitcher, or download episodes directly from SoundCloud. Stay up to date with Clear and Present Danger on the show’s Facebook and Twitter pages, or visit the podcast’s website at freespeechhistory.com. Email us feedback at freespeechhistory@gmail.com.

50mins

10 May 2019

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Episode 23 – Expert Opinion: Stephen Solomon part one - The First Amendment

Clear and Present Danger - A history of free speech

The First Amendment of the US Constitution was adopted as part of the Bill of Rights in 1791. This “Great bulwark of liberty” provides that  “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.” In this conversation with professor Stephen Solomon we will explore the origins and drafting history of the First Amendment including: The inspiration from early state constitutions and declarations in Virginia and Pennsylvania The Articles of Confederation The fierce debate surrounding the Constitutional Convention and ratification process. How Federalists and anti-Federalists clashed over the necessity of a bill of rights How some Federalists used the Heckler´s Veto to silence anti-Federalists  James Madison´s first draft bill of rights and why Madison thought that the American conception of freedom of speech differed substantially from the British conception Whether Freedom of Speech is really “the First Freedom” What were the essential justification for freedom of speech envisaged by the Founders Whether the Founders would agree with 21. Century standards of free speech as developed by the Supreme Court Why have kings, emperors, and governments killed and imprisoned people to shut them up? And why have countless people risked death and imprisonment to express their beliefs? Jacob Mchangama guides you through the history of free speech from the trial of Socrates to the Great Firewall. You can subscribe and listen to Clear and Present Danger on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, YouTube, TuneIn, and Stitcher, or download episodes directly from SoundCloud. Stay up to date with Clear and Present Danger on the show’s Facebook and Twitter pages, or visit the podcast’s website at freespeechhistory.com. Email us feedback at freespeechhistory@gmail.com.

51mins

17 Apr 2019

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HTE 444: Growing a Comic Convention Business (From a $5k Investment) | Stephen Solomon

Jon Nastor's Hack the Entrepreneur

To save on your next domain, visit Hover After nearly 500 interviews, it's great to have a guest on the show with a business unlike any other guest I've had. My guest today, Stephen Solomon, and a partner got started in business when they bought the now famous Tampa Bay Comic Convention for just $5,000. Today, he is the co-founder of Imaginarium, the company behind the Tampa Bay Indiana, San Francisco, Atlanta, and Michigan Comic Conventions. This conversation took place the week after their inaugural Indiana Comic Convention where they saw an attendance of 55,000 people over the weekend. During this conversation, we discuss: The drive and hustle required to succeed in the cut-throat comic convention industry Early expansion: its pitfalls and growth strategies The true value of learning as you go Now, let's hack... Stephen Solomon.

40mins

1 Oct 2018

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Ep. 14 NYU Professor Stephen Solomon’s ‘Revolutionary Dissent’

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

The time of America’s founding was full of raucous debate and widespread dissent. Americans built effigies, wrote pamphlets, sang songs, and gathered at liberty trees to protest British rule. But while citizens of the 13 colonies, and later America, might have acted like they had a right to express themselves in the myriad ways that they did, the spectre of seditious libel—illegal statements criticizing the government—often hung over their heads. In “Revolutionary Dissent: How the Founding Generation Created the Freedom of Speech,” New York University journalism professor Stephen D. Solomon chronicles how early Americans such as Paul Revere, James Madison, Alexander McDougall, and others fought seditious libel laws and developed their understanding of the right to freedom of speech along the way. We sit down with Professor Solomon in today’s episode of “So to Speak” to discuss his new book. We also learn why anyone who cared about free expression at the time of America’s founding associated it with the number 45. www.sotospeakpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/freespeechtalk Like us on Facebook: facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org Call in a question: 215-315-0100

43mins

3 Nov 2016