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Queen Victoria Podcasts

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32 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Queen Victoria. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Queen Victoria, often where they are interviewed.

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32 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Queen Victoria. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Queen Victoria, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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UTU Episode 64 with hollywood scream queen Victoria De Mare

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On our second to last episode of Uncovering The Underground we bring you:
Victoria De Mare is one of Hollywood's reigning "Hottest Horror Scream Queens" for over a decade according to the cover feature editorial article of the January 2017 issue of Hustler Magazine. She has appeared in over 145 Film & TV productions & counting. She is best known for her creation & portrayal of the sexy demon succubus clown, "Batty Boop" from the horror/comedy feature series, 'Killjoy', which is now available as a resin doll statue/action figure courtesy of Full Moon Collectibles worldwide November 2017. In November 2018 & again in January 2019, Full Moon Comix released 2 comic books featuring "Batty Boop" with both censored & uncensored covers now available worldwide.

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Aug 07 2020 · 1hr 39mins
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Mother and Daughter Drama, Starring Queen Victoria

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This week, we’re turning to family dramas between mothers and daughters. Playing the role of both is our friend Queen Victoria! As a daughter, she had a rebellious relationship against her mother, the Duchess of Kent. Becoming Queen meant Victoria was able to shake off her mother’s smothering influence—and she did. As a mother, Victoria had enough children to have all kinds of maternal relationships—good, bad, and in between. For today, we’ll see this range in the relationship to her youngest daughter, Beatrice. 

The Duchess tried to prepare Victoria to be Queen. Unfortunately, this involved creating a large role for Sir John Conroy, a man Victoria hated. Conroy had been the Duke’s equerry and became the Duchess’s closest adviser. He could be charming when he wished, but he was also manipulative. He saw the chance to gain greater power by running the household and establishing for himself a significant role in Victoria’s reign. 

Denying her mother this power, Victoria ascended to the throne. When she became a mother herself, she healed the relationship with her own mother. The Duchess was a doting grandmother and support to the Queen.

Echoing the better relationship with her own mother, Queen Victoria attempted to manage the lives of her own children. This was true of her youngest daughter, Beatrice. The baby fo the family was Victoria's obvious favorite, which meant she was expected to spend her life taking care of her mother. The relationship came into crisis when Beatrice wanted a husband and family of her own.

Victoria had trouble making peace with Beatrice's decision, but eventually she did. When Beatrice became a widow after 11 years of marriage, she returned to her mother's side. After Victoria's death, Beatrice was the literary executor of the Queen's journals, editing and rewriting the history to create the image she wanted her mother to have. So as much as Victoria hoped to shape her daughter's life, her daughter shaped her mother's legacy.

Jul 22 2020 · 20mins
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Queen Victoria and the Isle of Wight

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Hear about how Victoria Piekut created her unique boutique (complete with handmade flower walls inside!) called Wight Elephant, as well as her experiences with pageantry. Be sure to catch her competing in the Miss USA competition this year!

Jul 01 2020 · 24mins
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QUEEN VICTORIA ON BLACK LIVES MATTER - VICTORIA GUARDINO

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: Victoria Guardino is a recent graduate from Trinity College. She attributes her independence and spunk from growing up in New York City as an only child and product of divorce. In college she majored in both Sociology and Creative Writing. Victoria has always been outspoken about her opinions and beliefs and studying Sociology has only strengthened her understanding of how the world is created to advantage some and disadvantage others. However uncertain about her future, Victoria knows that she wants to dedicate her life to helping those that are systemically disregarded, doing work that makes her go to bed at night feeling accomplished. This past fall Victoria spent 4 months studying abroad in Copenhagen, Denmark and she hopes to one day move back there and immerse herself fully in Danish culture.
Jun 22 2020 · 27mins
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Body shaming Queen Victoria and the importance of grooming

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The trio chat about the importance of grooming and why we associate well being with being well groomed. They also chat about the excitement of going back to the pub. Des is looking forward to getting a haircut. They also look back at the early days of the lockdown and how different they feel about it now.

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Jun 18 2020 · 55mins
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Coryne Hall, "Queen Victoria and the Romanovs: 60 Years of Mutual Distrust" (Amberley, 2020)

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The balance of power in nineteenth-century Europe was anchored on one end by the redoubtable Queen Victoria (1819 -1901), the doyenne of sovereigns, and at the opposite end by the autocratic Romanov dynasty — four successive emperors who ruled Russia during Victoria's own 63-year reign. Between these great powers lay the rising military power of Prussia, which concerned both Britain and Russia, and a decaying Ottoman Empire from which both hoped to benefit, as well as shipping routes vital to both countries' commercial and military interests. These and numerous other concerns made the relationship tense at the best of times. But Victoria's large family was also entangled with the Romanovs through the complicated web of royal and dynastic marriages that linked the ruling houses of Europe.

These political and personal ties are the subject of royal biographer, Coryne Hall's new book, Queen Victoria and the Romanovs: 60 Years of Mutual Distrust (Amberley, 2020). Ms. Hall is a seasoned royal biographer and chronicler, who has delighted royal buffs with her authoritative biographies of Empress Maria Fyodorovna, Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna, and her exploration of royal Princesses who served as wartime nurses as well as the Imperial estates in the Crimea. In "Queen Victoria and the Romanovs," Ms. Hall delves into the extensive trove of Queen Victoria's diaries and personal correspondence to construct an ambitious and highly informative portrait of her six-decade relationship with the Romanovs, which is at times cordial and diplomatic and at other times overtly hostile.

The first encounter takes place "off stage" as far as Victoria is concerned, but very much sets the stage for the tension to come. Victoria's aunt, Juliane of Saxe-Coburg Saalfeld's miserable marriage to Russia's Grand Duke Constantine ended — most extraordinarily for the time — in divorce. The Coburg family felt that Juliane had been very badly treated by the Romanovs, a sentiment that was inherited by the next generation of Coburgs, which included Victoria and her cousin and future husband, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg.

Before Albert linked his name in perpetuity with that of Victoria, however, the 20-year-old Queen was swept off her feet — quite literally— by the dashing Grand Duke Alexander, son and heir of Tsar Nicholas I. On a visit to London in 1839, the Grand Duke made quite an impression on the young Queen; all thoughts of poor Aunt Julie and the prudent warnings of Lord Melbourne and Victoria's Coburg Uncle Leopold, King of the Belgians, were forgotten as Victoria indulged in champagne and her first "crush" on the future Tsar Alexander II.

The heady attraction did not last. Though Nicholas I and Victoria exchanged courteous, diplomatic correspondence, they were destined to clash in one of the nineteenth century's most brutal conflicts: the Crimean War, in which the British prevailed and Nicholas was driven to an early grave.

Coryne Hall is the author of 12 books, including A Biography of the Empress Marie Feodorovna 1847-1928Imperial Dancer. Mathilde Kschessinska and the Romanovs, and Imperial Crimea: Estates, Enchantment & the Last of the Romanovs. Follow Coryne Hall on Twitter.

Jennifer Eremeeva is an American expatriate writer who writes about travel, culture, cuisine and culinary history, Russian history, and Royal History, with bylines in Reuters, Fodor's, USTOA, LitHub, The Moscow Times, and Russian Life. She is the award-winning author of Lenin Lives Next Door: Marriage, Martinis, and Mayhem in Moscow and Have Personality Disorder, Will Rule Russia: A Pocket Guide to Russian History.

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May 27 2020 · 41mins
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Coryne Hall, "Queen Victoria and the Romanovs: 60 Years of Mutual Distrust" (Amberley, 2020)

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The balance of power in nineteenth-century Europe was anchored on one end by the redoubtable Queen Victoria (1819 -1901), the doyenne of sovereigns, and at the opposite end by the autocratic Romanov dynasty — four successive emperors who ruled Russia during Victoria's own 63-year reign. Between these great powers lay the rising military power of Prussia, which concerned both Britain and Russia, and a decaying Ottoman Empire from which both hoped to benefit, as well as shipping routes vital to both countries' commercial and military interests. These and numerous other concerns made the relationship tense at the best of times. But Victoria's large family was also entangled with the Romanovs through the complicated web of royal and dynastic marriages that linked the ruling houses of Europe.

These political and personal ties are the subject of royal biographer, Coryne Hall's new book, Queen Victoria and the Romanovs: 60 Years of Mutual Distrust (Amberley, 2020). Ms. Hall is a seasoned royal biographer and chronicler, who has delighted royal buffs with her authoritative biographies of Empress Maria Fyodorovna, Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna, and her exploration of royal Princesses who served as wartime nurses as well as the Imperial estates in the Crimea. In "Queen Victoria and the Romanovs," Ms. Hall delves into the extensive trove of Queen Victoria's diaries and personal correspondence to construct an ambitious and highly informative portrait of her six-decade relationship with the Romanovs, which is at times cordial and diplomatic and at other times overtly hostile.

The first encounter takes place "off stage" as far as Victoria is concerned, but very much sets the stage for the tension to come. Victoria's aunt, Juliane of Saxe-Coburg Saalfeld's miserable marriage to Russia's Grand Duke Constantine ended — most extraordinarily for the time — in divorce. The Coburg family felt that Juliane had been very badly treated by the Romanovs, a sentiment that was inherited by the next generation of Coburgs, which included Victoria and her cousin and future husband, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg.

Before Albert linked his name in perpetuity with that of Victoria, however, the 20-year-old Queen was swept off her feet — quite literally— by the dashing Grand Duke Alexander, son and heir of Tsar Nicholas I. On a visit to London in 1839, the Grand Duke made quite an impression on the young Queen; all thoughts of poor Aunt Julie and the prudent warnings of Lord Melbourne and Victoria's Coburg Uncle Leopold, King of the Belgians, were forgotten as Victoria indulged in champagne and her first "crush" on the future Tsar Alexander II.

The heady attraction did not last. Though Nicholas I and Victoria exchanged courteous, diplomatic correspondence, they were destined to clash in one of the nineteenth century's most brutal conflicts: the Crimean War, in which the British prevailed and Nicholas was driven to an early grave.

Coryne Hall is the author of 12 books, including A Biography of the Empress Marie Feodorovna 1847-1928Imperial Dancer. Mathilde Kschessinska and the Romanovs, and Imperial Crimea: Estates, Enchantment & the Last of the Romanovs. Follow Coryne Hall on Twitter.

Jennifer Eremeeva is an American expatriate writer who writes about travel, culture, cuisine and culinary history, Russian history, and Royal History, with bylines in Reuters, Fodor's, USTOA, LitHub, The Moscow Times, and Russian Life. She is the award-winning author of Lenin Lives Next Door: Marriage, Martinis, and Mayhem in Moscow and Have Personality Disorder, Will Rule Russia: A Pocket Guide to Russian History.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

May 27 2020 · 41mins
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Queen Victoria versus Constantine the Great

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In the Leaders bracket we pit the monarch of Great Britain who ruled for 63 years, Queen Victoria. Her opponent, the Emperor of the Roman Empire who allowed Christians to worship freely, Constantine the Great. Find out who moves on to the second round of the tournament.

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Apr 26 2020 · 22mins
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Queen Victoria

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The week I will be talking about scandals that surrounded Queen Victoria and her children. The rumours involve lot's of affairs and even a secret baby.

Apr 20 2020 · 24mins
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The Greedy Queen: Eating with Queen Victoria

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Join Noah and Dr. Annie Gray for a study of Queen Victoria’s life through the foods she enjoyed as well as a history of Victorian cuisine. Dr. Annie Gray, one of Britain’s leading food historians, specializes in British food and dinning from 1650 to present day and works as a consultant, broadcaster, and author. She is also a popular speaker and the resident food historian on BBC Radio 4’s The Kitchen Cabinet as well as a presenter on documentaries including The Sweet MakersVictorian Bakers, and Victoria & Albert: The Wedding. Dr. Gray is the author of a book titled The Greedy Queen: Eating with Victoria.

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Mar 05 2020 · 27mins
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