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Nancy Shoemaker

5 Podcast Episodes

Latest 1 May 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Ep. 5 Tragic Loss of Bertha Martinez and Nancy Shoemaker and History of Bags of Hot Air & Spit

Bloody Babbles

In this episode, we tell of the unfortunate murders of two sweet, little girls who were senselessly murdered. While Kelli enlightens our lives with the history of balloons. (Just. Heads up, I know Audio isn't amazing in this. I tried to edit to best of my limited knowledge. We are still working out kinks with mics and sound mixing so don't yell). https://www.ksn.com/news/crime/kansas-prisoner-review-board-releases-details-of-donald-wacker-decision/ https://www.bizjournals.com/wichita/stories/1999/11/08/editorial2.html https://www.austinchronicle.com/news/2003-10-17/182180/ https://law.justia.com/cases/texas/court-of-criminal-appeals/1996/71835-4.html https://murderpedia.org/male.L/l/lane-doil-edward.htm https://caselaw.findlaw.com/ks-supreme-court/1468236.html https://www.kansas.com/news/local/crime/article241544421.html#adnrb=900000 https://law.justia.com/cases/kansas/supreme-court/1993/68-211-3.html--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bloodybabbles/support

1hr 13mins

30 Jun 2020

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Nancy Shoemaker, “Native American Whalemen and the World” (UNC Press, 2015)

New Books in Native American Studies

For as long as Herman Melville’s Moby Dick has been a staple of the American literary canon, one element often goes unnoticed.The ship commanded by the monomanacial Ahab on his quest to slay the great white whale is named the Pequod, just one letter of difference from Pequot, a Native nation living within what is now southern New England. Perhaps Mellville was just participating in the widespread romantic nostalgia of the age, when many corporate enterprises and vessels took the name of the supposedly disappearing and noble Indians.Or, maybe he was simply gesturing at the reality of the industry.In the middle decades of the nineteenth century, when Moby Dick takes place, Native men from New England constituted a huge portion of the whaling workforce, some spending decades at sea, encountering diverse peoples across two oceans, and invigorating their economically marginalized reservations with vital income. These forgotten seamen finally have a chronicler in Nancy Shoemaker, professor of history at the University of Connecticut. Author or editor of seven books, her latest is Native American Whalemen and the World: Indigenous Encounters and the Contingency of Race (University of North Carolina Press, 2015). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/native-american-studies

1hr 1min

18 May 2015

Similar People

Episode artwork

Nancy Shoemaker, “Native American Whalemen and the World” (UNC Press, 2015)

New Books in World Affairs

For as long as Herman Melville’s Moby Dick has been a staple of the American literary canon, one element often goes unnoticed.The ship commanded by the monomanacial Ahab on his quest to slay the great white whale is named the Pequod, just one letter of difference from Pequot, a Native nation living within what is now southern New England. Perhaps Mellville was just participating in the widespread romantic nostalgia of the age, when many corporate enterprises and vessels took the name of the supposedly disappearing and noble Indians.Or, maybe he was simply gesturing at the reality of the industry.In the middle decades of the nineteenth century, when Moby Dick takes place, Native men from New England constituted a huge portion of the whaling workforce, some spending decades at sea, encountering diverse peoples across two oceans, and invigorating their economically marginalized reservations with vital income. These forgotten seamen finally have a chronicler in Nancy Shoemaker, professor of history at the University of Connecticut. Author or editor of seven books, her latest is Native American Whalemen and the World: Indigenous Encounters and the Contingency of Race (University of North Carolina Press, 2015). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

1hr 1min

18 May 2015

Episode artwork

Nancy Shoemaker, “Native American Whalemen and the World” (UNC Press, 2015)

New Books in American Studies

For as long as Herman Melville’s Moby Dick has been a staple of the American literary canon, one element often goes unnoticed.The ship commanded by the monomanacial Ahab on his quest to slay the great white whale is named the Pequod, just one letter of difference from Pequot, a Native nation living within what is now southern New England. Perhaps Mellville was just participating in the widespread romantic nostalgia of the age, when many corporate enterprises and vessels took the name of the supposedly disappearing and noble Indians.Or, maybe he was simply gesturing at the reality of the industry.In the middle decades of the nineteenth century, when Moby Dick takes place, Native men from New England constituted a huge portion of the whaling workforce, some spending decades at sea, encountering diverse peoples across two oceans, and invigorating their economically marginalized reservations with vital income. These forgotten seamen finally have a chronicler in Nancy Shoemaker, professor of history at the University of Connecticut. Author or editor of seven books, her latest is Native American Whalemen and the World: Indigenous Encounters and the Contingency of Race (University of North Carolina Press, 2015). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1hr 1min

18 May 2015

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Nancy Shoemaker, “Native American Whalemen and the World” (UNC Press, 2015)

New Books in History

For as long as Herman Melville’s Moby Dick has been a staple of the American literary canon, one element often goes unnoticed.The ship commanded by the monomanacial Ahab on his quest to slay the great white whale is named the Pequod, just one letter of difference from Pequot, a Native nation living within what is now southern New England. Perhaps Mellville was just participating in the widespread romantic nostalgia of the age, when many corporate enterprises and vessels took the name of the supposedly disappearing and noble Indians.Or, maybe he was simply gesturing at the reality of the industry.In the middle decades of the nineteenth century, when Moby Dick takes place, Native men from New England constituted a huge portion of the whaling workforce, some spending decades at sea, encountering diverse peoples across two oceans, and invigorating their economically marginalized reservations with vital income. These forgotten seamen finally have a chronicler in Nancy Shoemaker, professor of history at the University of Connecticut. Author or editor of seven books, her latest is Native American Whalemen and the World: Indigenous Encounters and the Contingency of Race (University of North Carolina Press, 2015). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

1hr 1min

18 May 2015