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Alex Natera Podcasts

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8 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Alex Natera. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Alex Natera, often where they are interviewed.

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8 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Alex Natera. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Alex Natera, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Alex Natera - Isometrics & Eccentrics (Senior Athletic Performance Specialist, GWS Giants Football Club)

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Episode 33: Andy McDonald chats to Strength & Conditioning Coach Alex Natera. Alex is based at GWS Giants Football Club in Sydney as Senior Athletic Performance Specialist. Alex has a wealth of experience and has enjoyed previous roles at Aspire Academy in Qatar, South Australian Sports Institute, English Institute of Sport, St Mary’s University, and Crystal Palace Football club to name a few. In this episode we have a discussion about something he is world renowned for in Isometrics and Eccentric training methods. 

In this episode Andy and Alex Natera discuss: 

  • Alex’s background 
  • Training during Covid. High-Neural output work
  • Alex’s interest in Isometrics
  • Reasoning & benefits isometrics 
  • When to implement isometrics 
  • Methods for implementing Isometrics 
  • Program transitioning in/out of isometrics 
  • Eccentric Training 
  • Isometrics in rehab

 Where you can find Alex:

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Keep up to date with everything that is going on with the podcast by following Inform Performance on:

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May 26 2020 · 51mins
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201: Alex Natera on the Origin of Run-Specific Isometrics and Their Integration in Team Sport Play vs. Training Sprinters | Sponsored by SimpliFaster

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Today’s episode features Alex Natera, senior athletic performance specialist at the GWS Giants of the AFL.  Alex has over twenty years of experience in high performance sport including time spent as a professional sportsman, a technical coach, a sport science lecturer, a published scientific researcher and his primary role as strength & conditioning coach.  Prior to the Giants, Alex was the senior strength and conditioning coach at Aspire Academy.

Alex’s original article on isometric training that was specific to training sprinters “broke the internet” several years ago.   In it, Alex laid out an approach to training sprinters (and speed in general) in the weightroom in a manner that was very novel to anything coaches had seen before, using isometric exercises to hone specific elements of the run cycle.   This was followed up by podcast #86 where Alex took us in the nuts and bolts of the training system for sprinters.

Since our last podcast, Alex, has spent a lot of time working with, not sprinters, but team sport athletes.  As much as the specificity of Alex’s isometrics to running still ring true in the scenario of training team sport athletes, working with this population versus sprinters is really a different “beast” than sprinters, who are more or less fresh all of the time and are athletic freaks.  On today’s show, Alex gets into the fine points of how he is incorporating his system into a team sport training regime.  Other topics we will cover will be Alex’s take on hamstring training for team sport athletes vs. sprinters, as well as a fun story regarding how the run-specific isometric protocol originated in the first place.

Today’s episode is brought to you by SimpliFaster, supplier of high-end athletic development tools, such as the Freelap timing system, kBox, Sprint 1080, and more.
Timestamps and Main Points

6:00 The history of Run-Specific isometrics, and the necessity that sparked the protocol that has now become very popular and effective in training sprint velocity

26:00 Strength norms for the knee, hip and ankle in run specific ISO’s

30:05 Some of the big differences in applying run-specific isometrics in team sport athletes, specifically Australian rules football, versus pure sprinters

42:00 How Run-Specific isometrics have a strong impact on running efficiency in team sport athletes who have long distances to navigate with each game

50:40 What Alex does when force plates are not available for Run-specific isometric training

52:30 Some of Alex’s methods in addressing hamstring injuries in team sport athletes
Quotes
 “I was involved in isometric training, back to when I was a little kid in the martial arts”

“I attest my strength in the scrum as a player completely to isometrics”

“Our guys were getting a training effect from (weekly) mid-thigh pull assessments”

“(A modern pentathlete) got 25% stronger in isometric mid-thigh pull, and then things like contact time at race pace, running economy, these things had a really positive shift”

“I agree, isometrics are the safest mode of lifting work”

“There is this minority group that can ruin themselves doing too much maximal isometric work”

“(For the modern pentathlete) We did 3 sets of 3x4 second pushes (in the single leg isometric mid-thigh pull), mostly around the 90% effort mark”

“It’s about 5x bodyweight for knee ISO push, for ankle ISO push, it’s about 3.5x bodyweight, for your hip ISO push, now it’s system mass, and it’s 3.5 times the system mass”

“When it comes to team sports (versus sprinting), it’s a whole new level with fatigue; they are always fatigued”

“The challenge is how do you incorporate isometrics into that program in a team sport athletes where the bucket it already full? Something has to come out of the bucket to put it back in”

“The easiest thing to take out of the program is the volume of traditional lifting”

“We certainly give small doses of isometric work,
May 07 2020 · 1hr 4mins

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Pacey Performance Podcast #267 - Alex Natera (Head of Strength & Power at GWS Giants)

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In this episode of the Pacey Performance Podcast, I am speaking to Head of Strength & Power at GWS Giants, Alex Natera. Anyone that has read or seen Alex's work knows that he is an incredible practitioner. He first came on the podcast back in episode 44 and 45 chatting about sprinting and also his PhD in repeat power ability. This episode we cover some of the same topics but get a refresher on how Alex thinks about these things but new to this episode is some amazing discussion around isometrics, something Alex has become world-renowned for. This is an incredible chat with Alex and one I know you will absolutely love.

If you liked this episode with Alex, you may enjoy these episodes which also focus on sprinting; James Wild, Dan Pfaff, Sprint Masterclass.

I hope you enjoy this episode with Alex Natera.

  • Who is Alex Natera?
  • Philosophical changes over the last 5 years - what have you changed your mind on?
  • Developing a sprint programme
    • Working with sprinters vs team sports
      • Learnings from institute life
    • Run specific isometrics - building the system into the wider programme
    • Max strength training vs co-ordinative strength
  • In-season maintenance/development
  • ‘Repeated power ability’
    • Thoughts changed on this?

Alex can be found on Twitter @alex_natera

This episode of the Pacey Performance Podcast is sponsored by Hawkin Dynamics, the team behind the worlds only wireless force plate system. Hawkin Dynamics can be found at hawkindynamics.com and you can follow them on Twitter @hawkindynamics

This episode is also sponsored by IMeasureU. IMeasureU are a world leading inertial platform to precisely quantify body movement and workload metrics in the field. IMeasureU can be found at imeasureu.com and you can follow them on Twitter @imeasureu.

This episode is sponsored by BLK BOX, leaders in performance training equipment & facility design. BLK BOX manufacture and distribute a full range of strength training equipment across Europe from their Headquarters in Belfast, Northern Ireland. BLK BOK can be found at blkboxfitness.com and you can follow them on Twitter @blkboxfitness and Instagram @blkboxfitness.

This episode is also sponsored by Kitman Labs. Kitman partners with leading sports teams to achieve consistent success, on and off the pitch. Over 150 teams across the globe use Kitman Labs' Athlete Optimization System to simplify daily operations and rely on the company's unique analytics to uncover the factors that influence success. You can find Kitman Labs at kitmanlabs.com and on Twitter @kitmanlabs.

Keep up to date with everything that is going on with the podcast by following on Twitter @strengthofsci or visiting strengthofscience.com.

Enjoy

PP

Nov 21 2019 · 1hr 10mins
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Ep 11. Heal achilles tendon injuries faster with BFR. "How you do BFR" guest is Alex Natera

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Hi there,

Rehabilitation of an achilles tendon can be lengthy and problematic.  Today's episode looks at two case studies that used Blood Flow Restriction to accelerate the rehab process where "traditional" processes had previously failed. The article I review is:

 Blood flow restriction training after Achilles tendon rupture. The Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery, 57(3), 635-638. Yow, B. G., Tennent, D. J., Dowd, T. C., Loenneke, J. P., & Owens, J. G. (2018).

In "how you do BFR" I interview Alex Natera who is strength and power coach for the GWS Giants AFL ("Aussie Rules"). Alex is well known for his isometric and eccentric work of recent time, but he delves into his journey of BFR.  Aside from highlighting some very interesting case studies we also discuss the importance of how to engage athletes in type of training methodology.

Alex regularly posts insightful and educational content on his social media so please give him a follow on the following platforms:

Twitter: @alex_natera

Instagram: @alex.natera

Thanks again for listening. 

If you enjoy my podcast, please leave a rating on iTunes.

Also, remember to purchase your own set of BFR cuffs please visit my website www.sportsrehab.com.au

Thanks for listening

Apr 07 2019 · 27mins

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Snippit 7 ► Environment and the 30-15 IFT with Alex Natera PhDc

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Snippit is made possible by listeners like you.

Please help support the podcast:

https://www.patreon.com/snippitscience 

We are very excited to have Alex Natera PhDc  on our podcast.  This is the first time we’ve brought in the author of the article to provide insight into their work. Chris and Alex first crossed paths in 2008, and they really enjoyed catching up.  Alex is putting some great content out on both Twitter @alex_natera and Instagram @alex.natera, so do yourself a favour and give him a follow. It is great to see someone continually improving their craft.

We aim to continue interviewing authors over time, so stayed tuned for our next guest author.  In the meantime, today’s podcast looks at how environmental conditions affect the 30-15IFT results.  Please enjoy:

J Strength Cond Res. 2019 Feb; 33(2):486-491

https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00124278-201902000-00023

Influence of Environmental Conditions on Performance and Heart Rate Responses to the 30-15 Incremental Fitness Test in Rugby Union Athletes.

Natera AOWJennings JOakley AJJones TW

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in performance and heart rate (HR) responses between a high heat outdoor condition (34.0° C, 64.1% humidity) and a temperate indoor condition (22.0° C, 50.0% humidity) during the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (30-15IFT).

Eight highly trained Rugby Union players (28.1 ± 1.5 years, 181.4 ± 8.8 cm, 88.4 ± 13.3 kg) completed the 30-15IFT in 2 different temperature conditions. Dependent variables recorded and analyzed included: final running speed of the 30-15IFT, HR at rest (HR rest), maximum HR (Max HR), HR recovery, average HR (HR ave), and submaximal HR corresponding to 25, 50, and 75% of final test speed (HR 25%, HR 50%, and HR 75%) and HR at 13 km·h (HR 13 km·h).

Greater running speeds were achieved when the test was conducted indoors (19.4 ± 0.7 km·h vs. 18.6 ± 0.6 km·h, p = 0.002, d = 1.67). Average HR and HR 13 km·h were greater when the test was conducted outdoors (p ≤ 0.05, d > 0.85). Large effect sizes were observed for the greater HR at submaximal intensities (d > 0.90).

The results of this study highlight the influence of temperature on 30-15IFT performance and cardiac responses. It is recommended that prescription of training based on 30-15IFT results reflects the temperature that the training will be performed in and that practitioners acknowledge that a meaningful change in assessment results can be the result of seasonal temperature change rather than training-induced change.

PMID: 28240715

DOI: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001865

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Apr 07 2019 · 16mins
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86: Alex Natera: Elite Strength Development for Speed | Sponsored by SimpliFaster

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Today’s episode features Alex Natera, Senior Athletic Performance Specialist at the GWS Giants.  Alex has over twenty years of experience in high performance sport including time spent as a professional sportsman, a technical coach, a sport science lecturer, a published scientific researcher, and his primary role as strength & conditioning coach.  

Prior to the Giants, Alex was the Senior S&C Coach of Aspire Academy Athletics specializing in the sprint events.  Alex has extensive work with the physical preparation of track and field athletes.  He also has worked as a Rugby head coach, and has done physical preparation for over a dozen Olympic and Commonwealth games sports.  Alex is currently completing his Ph.D. from Bond University where he is investigating a novel aspect of power development, high volume power training, and repeat power ability.

I first heard of Alex on the Historic Performance Podcast, and was truly intrigued by Alex’s way of thinking, which centered on using a series of maximal, specific isometric holds for speed development, and whereby his athletes were having great progressions in their overall training.  I had never seen or heard of isometrics being used in such a manner for the training of track and field sprinters, and digging deeper, connected with Alex and in our correspondence, he put together one of the greatest Q&A pieces that Just Fly Sports has put out.  Many months after its debut, it still continues to get likes and shares on social media.  

Not only are Alex’s isometric methods different, but they get results.  His methods also make sense.  If you have followed the training ideals of Christian Thibaudeau, Anatoliy Bondarchuk, Michael Yessis, Cal Dietz, Bret Contreras, and DB Hammer and put them together in a simple way that helped to get sprinters maximally fast, then you would have the system of Alex Natera.  

Today’s podcast was designed as a follow up to his article, and we dig into Alex’s background as an athlete, coach, and how he created his system of specialized strength training for speed and its progression.  We will get into questions and ideas of supramaximal and isometric strength training, combining isometrics with plyometric training, specialized exercises for building speed, yearly progressions, and more.  

Today’s episode is brought to you by SimpliFaster, supplier of high-end athletic development tools, such as the Freelap timing system, kBox, Sprint 1080, and more.  
View more podcast episodes at the podcast homepage.
Key Points:

Alex’s background as an athlete
Alex’s background in experimenting with isometric training and progressing it over the years
Specific case studies in isometric training and improved sprint speed
Combining isometrics with plyometrics
Utilizing and progressing supramaximal strength training for speed-seeking athletes
Knee vs. Hip and Ankle dominant supramaximal work
Alex’s top 3 exercises for improving athletic speed
Yearly progressions for more advanced sprint athletes
“Why, when I’m learning about muscle actions, do we only develop the concentric action?”

“If we are testing in the (mid-thigh isometric pull) environment, why aren’t we training in that environment as well?”

“There is not a lot of research there in regards to isometric training for running”

“A great muscle action with poor tendon ability and coordination is only going to take you so far, I always combine my plyometrics and isometric together”

“Integration of isometrics training in off-season and preseason periods for speed enhancement”

“After the season, I’ll get into my eccentric work straightaway.  Supramaximal eccentrics, depending on the athlete, will stay in up to 12 weeks”

“If you’ve got a 1RM and you put 110% and they cannot control that whatsoever, they are not ready for eccentric work, so just keep working them concentrically”

“(regarding supramaximal training) We have got to remember th...
Feb 20 2018 · 1hr 17mins
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Pacey Performance Podcast #45 - Alex Natera (Senior Strength & Conditioning Coach at the Aspire Academy)

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In this episode of the Pacey Performance Podcast I speaking with Alex Natera, senior strength & conditioning coach for athletics at Aspire Academy. Alex is a super nice guy who has a vast amount of knowledge after working in Championship rugby, Premier League football and at the English Institute of Sport. He is also currently completing his PhD on the expression of repeated bouts of power. This is the second part of this episode discussing Alex's labor of love, repeated power. In such an under-researched area he talks about some really interesting findings and where he sees the area going.

In this episode you will learn -

  • How 'repeated power' differs from power endurance
  • Why this ISN'T CrossFit
  • What has been researched in the area
  • How can we train repeated power ability
  • Where is the research area heading and what does Alex expect to find

Keep up to date with everything that is going on with the podcast by following me on Twitter @paceyperform or visiting paceyperformance.co.uk/podcast.

Alex can be found on Twitter @alex_natera

Enjoy

PP

Aug 05 2015 · 41mins
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Pacey Performance Podcast #44 - Alex Natera (Senior Strength & Conditioning Coach at the Aspire Academy)

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In this episode of the Pacey Performance Podcast I speaking with Alex Natera, senior strength & conditioning coach for athletics at Aspire Academy. Alex is a super nice guy who has a vast amount of knowledge after working in Championship rugby, Premier League football and at the English Institute of Sport. He is also currently completing his PhD on the expression of repeated bouts of power. This is the first of a two-part episode discussing his work with track and field athletes at Aspire.

In this episode you will learn -

  • Who is Alex Natera (background/education)
  • What Alex is doing now and who he is working with
  • Developing a sprint programme - where to start
  • Developing horizontal vs vertical force
  • Transfer of training from weight room to track/field

Keep up to date with everything that is going on with the podcast by following me on Twitter @paceyperform or visiting paceyperformance.co.uk/podcast.

Alex can be found on Twitter @alex_natera

Enjoy

PP

Jul 29 2015 · 46mins