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Victor Savkin

17 Podcast Episodes

Latest 1 May 2021 | Updated Daily

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RRU 081: NX and Monorepos with Jeffrey Cross and Victor Savkin

Devchat.tv Episode Roundup

Jeffrey Cross and Victor Savkin are the cofounders of NRWL. They used to work together at Google on the Angular team and started NRWL so that people could use Angular 2 well. Victor talks about NRWL’s tool NX, which came from the desire to help people develop like the tech giants. Companies like Google and Facebook develop in the same repository so that people can collaborate. NX is an open source tool for this collaborative development, known as a monorepo.  Monorepo style development is a way to develop applications such that you develop multiple projects in the same repository and you use tooling to orchestrate development. The tooling connects everything, makes the experience coherent, and ultimately makes the monorepo style work. The benefits of monorepo development are that the tool chain enables you to interact with different projects in the same fashion, collaboration is more effective, and multiple apps can be refactored at once.  The panel discusses what situations are appropriate for a monorepo and which are not. Victor believes that any company with more than one large product would benefit from a monorepo, but it would not benefit a company that wants to keep their teams distinct from one another. The hosts express some concerns about implementation, such as scaling and creating the infrastructure. Victor assures them that a monorepo is inherently scalable, and most tools will work for years and years. As for the infrastructure, companies like NRWL specialize in helping companies set up monorepos, and NX provides many of the necessary tools for a monorepo. A monorepo can be tailor-made to fit any size of company, and can even be created for already established projects.  If you wanted to start your own monorepo, you can start by taking a project or handful of projects and moving them to the same place. As you develop, pull pieces of your applications out and put them into packages. Victor cautions that monorepos tend towards a single version policy, so you’ll want to get on the same version as your third party dependencies before you move your next application in. You can move things in and temporarily have different versions, but plan to make them the same version eventually. Victor talks about how the CI in a monorepo setup looks different, because you run tests against everything that might be broken by that change, not just the project its in. So, when you change something in your code, you need to consider what other pieces of code need to be taken into account. A monorepo does make dependencies more explicit, and when you have good tooling it’s easier to see the effect the changes you make have. This is where NX excels. One of the big advantages of NX is that it allows you to partition your application into packages with a well defined API, and prevents the project from becoming one giant node. You can then interact with those packages, and see what happens when you change something. You have a lot more clarity of how your app is partitioned and what the restraints are. NX allows you to share stuff between the front and backend.  The show concludes with the conversation turning to Jeffrey and Victor’s consulting work. They talk about some of the interesting features that are happening outside of React that we are missing out on. Victor is very impressed with tooling in the Angular community. He talks about a tool called Console for NX. They end by talking about the schematic powered migrations in Angular.  Panelists Leslie Cohn-Wein Dave Ceddia Lucas Reis With special guest: Jeffrey Cross and Victor Savkin Sponsors Sustain Our Software Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry’s small plan My JavaScript Story Links NRWL Angular NX Building Fullstack React Applications in Monorepo Angular CLI Follow DevChatTV on Facebook and Twitter Picks Lucas Reis: Dear Startup Cryptocurrencies video by 1Blue1Brown Dave Ceddia: Help, I’ve Fallen (into code) and I Can’t Get Up! Code maps frontend Victor Savkin: Ember Mug Heal the Internet Jeffrey Cross:  lululemon Commission pant Leslie Cohn-Wein Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People Everylayout.dev

49mins

1 Oct 2019

Episode artwork

RRU 081: NX and Monorepos with Jeffrey Cross and Victor Savkin

React Round Up

Jeffrey Cross and Victor Savkin are the cofounders of NRWL. They used to work together at Google on the Angular team and started NRWL so that people could use Angular 2 well. Victor talks about NRWL’s tool NX, which came from the desire to help people develop like the tech giants. Companies like Google and Facebook develop in the same repository so that people can collaborate. NX is an open source tool for this collaborative development, known as a monorepo.  Monorepo style development is a way to develop applications such that you develop multiple projects in the same repository and you use tooling to orchestrate development. The tooling connects everything, makes the experience coherent, and ultimately makes the monorepo style work. The benefits of monorepo development are that the tool chain enables you to interact with different projects in the same fashion, collaboration is more effective, and multiple apps can be refactored at once.  The panel discusses what situations are appropriate for a monorepo and which are not. Victor believes that any company with more than one large product would benefit from a monorepo, but it would not benefit a company that wants to keep their teams distinct from one another. The hosts express some concerns about implementation, such as scaling and creating the infrastructure. Victor assures them that a monorepo is inherently scalable, and most tools will work for years and years. As for the infrastructure, companies like NRWL specialize in helping companies set up monorepos, and NX provides many of the necessary tools for a monorepo. A monorepo can be tailor-made to fit any size of company, and can even be created for already established projects.  If you wanted to start your own monorepo, you can start by taking a project or handful of projects and moving them to the same place. As you develop, pull pieces of your applications out and put them into packages. Victor cautions that monorepos tend towards a single version policy, so you’ll want to get on the same version as your third party dependencies before you move your next application in. You can move things in and temporarily have different versions, but plan to make them the same version eventually. Victor talks about how the CI in a monorepo setup looks different, because you run tests against everything that might be broken by that change, not just the project its in. So, when you change something in your code, you need to consider what other pieces of code need to be taken into account. A monorepo does make dependencies more explicit, and when you have good tooling it’s easier to see the effect the changes you make have. This is where NX excels. One of the big advantages of NX is that it allows you to partition your application into packages with a well defined API, and prevents the project from becoming one giant node. You can then interact with those packages, and see what happens when you change something. You have a lot more clarity of how your app is partitioned and what the restraints are. NX allows you to share stuff between the front and backend.  The show concludes with the conversation turning to Jeffrey and Victor’s consulting work. They talk about some of the interesting features that are happening outside of React that we are missing out on. Victor is very impressed with tooling in the Angular community. He talks about a tool called Console for NX. They end by talking about the schematic powered migrations in Angular.  Panelists Leslie Cohn-Wein Dave Ceddia Lucas Reis With special guest: Jeffrey Cross and Victor Savkin Sponsors Sustain Our Software Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry’s small plan My JavaScript Story Links NRWL Angular NX Building Fullstack React Applications in Monorepo Angular CLI Follow DevChatTV on Facebook and Twitter Picks Lucas Reis: Dear Startup Cryptocurrencies video by 1Blue1Brown Dave Ceddia: Help, I’ve Fallen (into code) and I Can’t Get Up! Code maps frontend Victor Savkin: Ember Mug Heal the Internet Jeffrey Cross:  lululemon Commission pant Leslie Cohn-Wein Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People Everylayout.dev

49mins

1 Oct 2019

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AiA 256: Debunking Monorepo Myths with Victor Savkin

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Episode Summary Victor Savkin, former angular team member and now cofounder of Narwhal Technologies Inc or Nrwl, returns to Adventures in Angular to teach the panel about monorepos. Victor starts by explaining what monorepos are and why you might need one. Monorepo style development is when multiple projects developed in the same repository and the tools used to manage code between those apps.  There are many benefits to using monorepos as Victor explains to the panel, such as sharing code between apps. Monorepos help you see what's going on in reality as well as helps you take control of the structure of your code. It also allows for more interesting deployment strategies. Victor talks briefly about his time at Google, working on the toolchain and using a large monorepo. After the panel asks about the costs of using a monorepo strategy, Victor explains that there are many perceived costs that are actually false or easily overcome. The first perceived cost he tells the panel about is how people get confused and believe that apps have to be deployed together when they really have to be developed in the same repository. The second is the fear of misplaced ownership, that some other developer will come along and ruin their code. Victor explains that ownership can be configured and controlled so that no one you don’t trust can touch your code.  The next myth developers believe about monorepos is that it doesn’t scale and especially when it comes to performance. Victor explains that when the app is set up correctly and testing used correctly this isn’t a problem. The final perceived cost is that Git will break. Victor debunks this by explaining that you would have to be doing extremely well in order for Git to be a bottleneck and even then there are ways around that problem.  Victor explains the one real cost and that is you have to change the way you code. The panel discusses a few different coding styles. Victor recommends getting used to single version policy and trunk-based development. He defines trunk-based development, explaining how it works and why it is better for monorepos than long-range branch development.  Victor sees two types of groups who want to get started in monorepos and he explains what they most commonly do wrong. The first is greenfield projects who jump right in without thinking about it and eventually crash. The second is teams with a giant app and through a monorepo in hoping it will help them structure their app. He explains there is a right way to start using monorepos in both situations. Asking the important question is how to get started. Agreeing upon the structure, naming, ownership, are you going to build the frontend and backend in the same repo, and the answers to a bunch of other questions will affect your work the most, even more than the tooling you use. Some of these answers will be specific to your company where others will be universal, like naming and ownership.  With other tools for monorepo out there, the panel asks Victor why Nrwl decided to build their own tool. Victor explains that the current tools on the market do not do it all. Lerna only does one thing great and Bazel is very selective on who can run it. Nrwl is hoping to marry Bazel to Nx, so they can allow everyone to use Bazel. They want Nx to support all tools and even Windows.  The panel wonders if Nx is perfect. Victor explains that it nearly there. Nx is pluggable and easy to use. It is easy to learn. Victor explains that they really care about developer experience at Nrwl. Nx is free and opensource so everyone can give monorepos a try.  Resources for learning about monorepos are discussed. Victor invites everyone to watch the ten-minute getting started video on the Nx website. He also lets the listeners know about a new book coming out mid-September and it will be more organizational based than the last. The panel wants to know what comes with Nx. Victor explains that Nx gives you modern tools by setting up Cypress, Jest and other tools for you. Because Nrwl is a consulting firm, the panel hopes that Victor will have an update on the trends. Victor shares his view that trends don’t really tell you anything about the true status of a framework. How many downloads a framework has doesn’t show the longevity of that framework. Frameworks being used to make large scale apps that will be around for years is how you can tell the longevity of a framework. From that perspective, Victor feels that Angular is doing really well.  To end the episode, Shai Reznik recalls how passionate Victor was about NgRx a few years ago. He asks Victor if he still feels the same way as before. Victor explains that NgRx is pretty well most of the time, has great docs, is well maintained, and he would still recommend it. Panelists Jennifer Wadella Brian Love Shai Reznik Alyssa Nicoll Guest Victor Savkin Sponsors   Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp My JavaScript Story Cachefly Links https://twitter.com/victorsavkin?lang=en Nrwl Nx — An open source toolkit for enterprise Angular applications. Effective React Development with Nx https://connect.nrwl.io/app/books https://nx.dev/angular/getting-started/what-is-nx MAS 040: Victor Savkin 042 AiA Dependency Injection and Change Detection with Victor Savkin 123 AiA Upgrading from Angular 1 to Angular 2 with Victor Savkin https://nrwl.io/ https://nx.dev/ Momentum https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Brain Love: https://trunkbaseddevelopment.com/ https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/why-angular-for/9781492030294/ Alyssa Nicoll: Caffeine Content Warning! Jennnifer Wadella: The Fall Season NGD Conf Laptop Safety at Conferences Victor Savkin: The Boys Use Less Social Media Freedom App Shai Reznik: https://bit.dev/ True Detective

1hr 9mins

10 Sep 2019

Episode artwork

AiA 256: Debunking Monorepo Myths with Victor Savkin

Adventures in Angular

Episode Summary Victor Savkin, former angular team member and now cofounder of Narwhal Technologies Inc or Nrwl, returns to Adventures in Angular to teach the panel about monorepos. Victor starts by explaining what monorepos are and why you might need one. Monorepo style development is when multiple projects developed in the same repository and the tools used to manage code between those apps.  There are many benefits to using monorepos as Victor explains to the panel, such as sharing code between apps. Monorepos help you see what's going on in reality as well as helps you take control of the structure of your code. It also allows for more interesting deployment strategies. Victor talks briefly about his time at Google, working on the toolchain and using a large monorepo. After the panel asks about the costs of using a monorepo strategy, Victor explains that there are many perceived costs that are actually false or easily overcome. The first perceived cost he tells the panel about is how people get confused and believe that apps have to be deployed together when they really have to be developed in the same repository. The second is the fear of misplaced ownership, that some other developer will come along and ruin their code. Victor explains that ownership can be configured and controlled so that no one you don’t trust can touch your code.  The next myth developers believe about monorepos is that it doesn’t scale and especially when it comes to performance. Victor explains that when the app is set up correctly and testing used correctly this isn’t a problem. The final perceived cost is that Git will break. Victor debunks this by explaining that you would have to be doing extremely well in order for Git to be a bottleneck and even then there are ways around that problem.  Victor explains the one real cost and that is you have to change the way you code. The panel discusses a few different coding styles. Victor recommends getting used to single version policy and trunk-based development. He defines trunk-based development, explaining how it works and why it is better for monorepos than long-range branch development.  Victor sees two types of groups who want to get started in monorepos and he explains what they most commonly do wrong. The first is greenfield projects who jump right in without thinking about it and eventually crash. The second is teams with a giant app and through a monorepo in hoping it will help them structure their app. He explains there is a right way to start using monorepos in both situations. Asking the important question is how to get started. Agreeing upon the structure, naming, ownership, are you going to build the frontend and backend in the same repo, and the answers to a bunch of other questions will affect your work the most, even more than the tooling you use. Some of these answers will be specific to your company where others will be universal, like naming and ownership.  With other tools for monorepo out there, the panel asks Victor why Nrwl decided to build their own tool. Victor explains that the current tools on the market do not do it all. Lerna only does one thing great and Bazel is very selective on who can run it. Nrwl is hoping to marry Bazel to Nx, so they can allow everyone to use Bazel. They want Nx to support all tools and even Windows.  The panel wonders if Nx is perfect. Victor explains that it nearly there. Nx is pluggable and easy to use. It is easy to learn. Victor explains that they really care about developer experience at Nrwl. Nx is free and opensource so everyone can give monorepos a try.  Resources for learning about monorepos are discussed. Victor invites everyone to watch the ten-minute getting started video on the Nx website. He also lets the listeners know about a new book coming out mid-September and it will be more organizational based than the last. The panel wants to know what comes with Nx. Victor explains that Nx gives you modern tools by setting up Cypress, Jest and other tools for you. Because Nrwl is a consulting firm, the panel hopes that Victor will have an update on the trends. Victor shares his view that trends don’t really tell you anything about the true status of a framework. How many downloads a framework has doesn’t show the longevity of that framework. Frameworks being used to make large scale apps that will be around for years is how you can tell the longevity of a framework. From that perspective, Victor feels that Angular is doing really well.  To end the episode, Shai Reznik recalls how passionate Victor was about NgRx a few years ago. He asks Victor if he still feels the same way as before. Victor explains that NgRx is pretty well most of the time, has great docs, is well maintained, and he would still recommend it. Panelists Jennifer Wadella Brian Love Shai Reznik Alyssa Nicoll Guest Victor Savkin Sponsors   Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp My JavaScript Story Cachefly Links https://twitter.com/victorsavkin?lang=en Nrwl Nx — An open source toolkit for enterprise Angular applications. Effective React Development with Nx https://connect.nrwl.io/app/books https://nx.dev/angular/getting-started/what-is-nx MAS 040: Victor Savkin 042 AiA Dependency Injection and Change Detection with Victor Savkin 123 AiA Upgrading from Angular 1 to Angular 2 with Victor Savkin https://nrwl.io/ https://nx.dev/ Momentum https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Brain Love: https://trunkbaseddevelopment.com/ https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/why-angular-for/9781492030294/ Alyssa Nicoll: Caffeine Content Warning! Jennnifer Wadella: The Fall Season NGD Conf Laptop Safety at Conferences Victor Savkin: The Boys Use Less Social Media Freedom App Shai Reznik: https://bit.dev/ True Detective

1hr 9mins

10 Sep 2019

Most Popular

Episode artwork

AiA 256: Debunking Monorepo Myths with Victor Savkin

Devchat.tv Episode Roundup

Episode Summary Victor Savkin, former angular team member and now cofounder of Narwhal Technologies Inc or Nrwl, returns to Adventures in Angular to teach the panel about monorepos. Victor starts by explaining what monorepos are and why you might need one. Monorepo style development is when multiple projects developed in the same repository and the tools used to manage code between those apps.  There are many benefits to using monorepos as Victor explains to the panel, such as sharing code between apps. Monorepos help you see what's going on in reality as well as helps you take control of the structure of your code. It also allows for more interesting deployment strategies. Victor talks briefly about his time at Google, working on the toolchain and using a large monorepo. After the panel asks about the costs of using a monorepo strategy, Victor explains that there are many perceived costs that are actually false or easily overcome. The first perceived cost he tells the panel about is how people get confused and believe that apps have to be deployed together when they really have to be developed in the same repository. The second is the fear of misplaced ownership, that some other developer will come along and ruin their code. Victor explains that ownership can be configured and controlled so that no one you don’t trust can touch your code.  The next myth developers believe about monorepos is that it doesn’t scale and especially when it comes to performance. Victor explains that when the app is set up correctly and testing used correctly this isn’t a problem. The final perceived cost is that Git will break. Victor debunks this by explaining that you would have to be doing extremely well in order for Git to be a bottleneck and even then there are ways around that problem.  Victor explains the one real cost and that is you have to change the way you code. The panel discusses a few different coding styles. Victor recommends getting used to single version policy and trunk-based development. He defines trunk-based development, explaining how it works and why it is better for monorepos than long-range branch development.  Victor sees two types of groups who want to get started in monorepos and he explains what they most commonly do wrong. The first is greenfield projects who jump right in without thinking about it and eventually crash. The second is teams with a giant app and through a monorepo in hoping it will help them structure their app. He explains there is a right way to start using monorepos in both situations. Asking the important question is how to get started. Agreeing upon the structure, naming, ownership, are you going to build the frontend and backend in the same repo, and the answers to a bunch of other questions will affect your work the most, even more than the tooling you use. Some of these answers will be specific to your company where others will be universal, like naming and ownership.  With other tools for monorepo out there, the panel asks Victor why Nrwl decided to build their own tool. Victor explains that the current tools on the market do not do it all. Lerna only does one thing great and Bazel is very selective on who can run it. Nrwl is hoping to marry Bazel to Nx, so they can allow everyone to use Bazel. They want Nx to support all tools and even Windows.  The panel wonders if Nx is perfect. Victor explains that it nearly there. Nx is pluggable and easy to use. It is easy to learn. Victor explains that they really care about developer experience at Nrwl. Nx is free and opensource so everyone can give monorepos a try.  Resources for learning about monorepos are discussed. Victor invites everyone to watch the ten-minute getting started video on the Nx website. He also lets the listeners know about a new book coming out mid-September and it will be more organizational based than the last. The panel wants to know what comes with Nx. Victor explains that Nx gives you modern tools by setting up Cypress, Jest and other tools for you. Because Nrwl is a consulting firm, the panel hopes that Victor will have an update on the trends. Victor shares his view that trends don’t really tell you anything about the true status of a framework. How many downloads a framework has doesn’t show the longevity of that framework. Frameworks being used to make large scale apps that will be around for years is how you can tell the longevity of a framework. From that perspective, Victor feels that Angular is doing really well.  To end the episode, Shai Reznik recalls how passionate Victor was about NgRx a few years ago. He asks Victor if he still feels the same way as before. Victor explains that NgRx is pretty well most of the time, has great docs, is well maintained, and he would still recommend it. Panelists Jennifer Wadella Brian Love Shai Reznik Alyssa Nicoll Guest Victor Savkin Sponsors   Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp My JavaScript Story Cachefly Links https://twitter.com/victorsavkin?lang=en Nrwl Nx — An open source toolkit for enterprise Angular applications. Effective React Development with Nx https://connect.nrwl.io/app/books https://nx.dev/angular/getting-started/what-is-nx MAS 040: Victor Savkin 042 AiA Dependency Injection and Change Detection with Victor Savkin 123 AiA Upgrading from Angular 1 to Angular 2 with Victor Savkin https://nrwl.io/ https://nx.dev/ Momentum https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Brain Love: https://trunkbaseddevelopment.com/ https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/why-angular-for/9781492030294/ Alyssa Nicoll: Caffeine Content Warning! Jennnifer Wadella: The Fall Season NGD Conf Laptop Safety at Conferences Victor Savkin: The Boys Use Less Social Media Freedom App Shai Reznik: https://bit.dev/ True Detective

1hr 9mins

10 Sep 2019

Episode artwork

Episode 24: Multi-App and Multi-Team Development with Victor Savkin

Web Rush

Recording date: 2019-02-12 John Papa @John_Papa Ward Bell @WardBell Victor Savkin @VictorSavkin Resources: Narwhal Technologies Viktor on Medium Conway’s Law Angular React Vue Yarn npm npm vs yarn npx Typescript The Typescript Tax How Webstorm Works with Javascript Libraries VS Code Typescript Someone to follow Secret Women of Coding Igor Minar Monk on IMDB On Liberty Timejumps 00:45 What Ward's been up to 02:49 Guest introduction 03:32 What is a large app? 07:05 Conway's Law 08:15 How do you promote knowledge? 11:26 Similar patterns in CLI 15:09 Sponsor: Dev Interersection 16:02 Yarn and NPM 18:37 What about NPX? 19:48 Number of teams vs size of teams 21:57 How do you manage multiple teams on multiple sprints? 35:38 Tooling for Angular Developers 45:26 Sponsor: IdeaBlade 46:25 What's the best way to get familair with a new project 50:30 What would help shipping multiple versions of an app? 54:59 The Typescript tax 02:55 Someone to follow

1hr 8mins

19 Mar 2019

Episode artwork

MAS 040: Victor Savkin

Devchat.tv Episode Roundup

Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Victor Savkin This week on My Angular Story, Charles speaks with Victor Savkin about his business Narwhal Technologies. In addition, they discuss Angular, past and current business projects, and their picks. Victor is a co-founder of nrwl.io, providing Angular consulting to enterprise teams. He was previously on the Angular core team at Google, and built the dependency injection, change detection, forms and router modules. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: Victor’s background. Two of Victor’s past episodes on the “My Angular Story:” Episode 42 Episode 123 When and how did you get into programming? Back when Victor was in Russia and playing games. This brought him to the idea that “I could build my own game” when he was a teenager. Programming is hard and difficult, but also fun and enjoying. There is a creative side to this. State of flow. How did you go from creating games with Flash to Angular? Eventually ended up using Angular. Victor prefers to use on the backend. It’s interesting to see how things have changed, such as Data Flow and Business Logic. In what ways do you think it has improved? Charles first got into programming it was Rails. JavaScript sprinkles Ember into Angular Why does this feel much harder – because we are solving much more complicated issues. Look at the tools we have today. Trello How did you get into Angular 14? Dart What contributions do you feel that you have made on the Angular team? Angular Dart In writing Angular apps, Charles is curious, how is it different writing the framework vs. an app within the framework? What made you and Jeff leave Google and go start Narwhal Technologies (nrwl.io)? I felt like I could provide more value. What things have Narwhal been contributing to the community? What are you working on now? NX Personal life Wedding in August and buying a home for Victor. Links: FreshBooks Past “My Angular Story” Episodes Data Flow Business Logic JavaScript Ember Trello Dart Narwhal Technologies NX Rails Victor Savkin’s Angular Victor Savkin’s Medium Victor Savkin’s Twitter Victor Savkin’s LinkedIn Victor Savkin’s GitHub Victor Savkin’s Lean Pub Victor Savkin’s Nrwl Blog Victor Savkin’s Book: Angular Router Victor Savkin’s & Jeff Cross’ Book: Essential Angular Angular Digital Ocean Cache Fly Sponsor: Digital Ocean Picks: Charles Audio Books: “The Big Leap” by Gay Hendricks “The Whole-Brain Child” by Daniel J. Siegel & Tina Payne Bryson Take a minute to be human through life’s different experiences. Victor Self-Help Books They Daily Stoic by Ryan Holiday & Stephen Hanselman Go see your doctor first before you buy equipment! Logitech Wireless Trackball Vertical Mouse

45mins

13 Jun 2018

Episode artwork

MAS 040: Victor Savkin

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Victor Savkin This week on My Angular Story, Charles speaks with Victor Savkin about his business Narwhal Technologies. In addition, they discuss Angular, past and current business projects, and their picks. Victor is a co-founder of nrwl.io, providing Angular consulting to enterprise teams. He was previously on the Angular core team at Google, and built the dependency injection, change detection, forms and router modules. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: Victor’s background. Two of Victor’s past episodes on the “My Angular Story:” Episode 42 Episode 123 When and how did you get into programming? Back when Victor was in Russia and playing games. This brought him to the idea that “I could build my own game” when he was a teenager. Programming is hard and difficult, but also fun and enjoying. There is a creative side to this. State of flow. How did you go from creating games with Flash to Angular? Eventually ended up using Angular. Victor prefers to use on the backend. It’s interesting to see how things have changed, such as Data Flow and Business Logic. In what ways do you think it has improved? Charles first got into programming it was Rails. JavaScript sprinkles Ember into Angular Why does this feel much harder – because we are solving much more complicated issues. Look at the tools we have today. Trello How did you get into Angular 14? Dart What contributions do you feel that you have made on the Angular team? Angular Dart In writing Angular apps, Charles is curious, how is it different writing the framework vs. an app within the framework? What made you and Jeff leave Google and go start Narwhal Technologies (nrwl.io)? I felt like I could provide more value. What things have Narwhal been contributing to the community? What are you working on now? NX Personal life Wedding in August and buying a home for Victor. Links: FreshBooks Past “My Angular Story” Episodes Data Flow Business Logic JavaScript Ember Trello Dart Narwhal Technologies NX Rails Victor Savkin’s Angular Victor Savkin’s Medium Victor Savkin’s Twitter Victor Savkin’s LinkedIn Victor Savkin’s GitHub Victor Savkin’s Lean Pub Victor Savkin’s Nrwl Blog Victor Savkin’s Book: Angular Router Victor Savkin’s & Jeff Cross’ Book: Essential Angular Angular Digital Ocean Cache Fly Sponsor: Digital Ocean Picks: Charles Audio Books: “The Big Leap” by Gay Hendricks “The Whole-Brain Child” by Daniel J. Siegel & Tina Payne Bryson Take a minute to be human through life’s different experiences. Victor Self-Help Books They Daily Stoic by Ryan Holiday & Stephen Hanselman Go see your doctor first before you buy equipment! Logitech Wireless Trackball Vertical Mouse

45mins

13 Jun 2018

Episode artwork

MAS 040: Victor Savkin

My Angular Story

Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Victor Savkin This week on My Angular Story, Charles speaks with Victor Savkin about his business Narwhal Technologies. In addition, they discuss Angular, past and current business projects, and their picks. Victor is a co-founder of nrwl.io, providing Angular consulting to enterprise teams. He was previously on the Angular core team at Google, and built the dependency injection, change detection, forms and router modules. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: Victor’s background. Two of Victor’s past episodes on the “My Angular Story:” Episode 42 Episode 123 When and how did you get into programming? Back when Victor was in Russia and playing games. This brought him to the idea that “I could build my own game” when he was a teenager. Programming is hard and difficult, but also fun and enjoying. There is a creative side to this. State of flow. How did you go from creating games with Flash to Angular? Eventually ended up using Angular. Victor prefers to use on the backend. It’s interesting to see how things have changed, such as Data Flow and Business Logic. In what ways do you think it has improved? Charles first got into programming it was Rails. JavaScript sprinkles Ember into Angular Why does this feel much harder – because we are solving much more complicated issues. Look at the tools we have today. Trello How did you get into Angular 14? Dart What contributions do you feel that you have made on the Angular team? Angular Dart In writing Angular apps, Charles is curious, how is it different writing the framework vs. an app within the framework? What made you and Jeff leave Google and go start Narwhal Technologies (nrwl.io)? I felt like I could provide more value. What things have Narwhal been contributing to the community? What are you working on now? NX Personal life Wedding in August and buying a home for Victor. Links: FreshBooks Past “My Angular Story” Episodes Data Flow Business Logic JavaScript Ember Trello Dart Narwhal Technologies NX Rails Victor Savkin’s Angular Victor Savkin’s Medium Victor Savkin’s Twitter Victor Savkin’s LinkedIn Victor Savkin’s GitHub Victor Savkin’s Lean Pub Victor Savkin’s Nrwl Blog Victor Savkin’s Book: Angular Router Victor Savkin’s & Jeff Cross’ Book: Essential Angular Angular Digital Ocean Cache Fly Sponsor: Digital Ocean Picks: Charles Audio Books: “The Big Leap” by Gay Hendricks “The Whole-Brain Child” by Daniel J. Siegel & Tina Payne Bryson Take a minute to be human through life’s different experiences. Victor Self-Help Books They Daily Stoic by Ryan Holiday & Stephen Hanselman Go see your doctor first before you buy equipment! Logitech Wireless Trackball Vertical Mouse

45mins

13 Jun 2018

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ngAir 140 - Nx for Enterprise Angular Development with Victor Savkin

Angular Air

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1hr

14 Dec 2017

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