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Manu Prakash

11 Podcast Episodes

Latest 6 Nov 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Foldscope - Manu Prakash

বিজ্ঞান পডকাস্ট (Bigyan Podcast)

বিজ্ঞানের গুরুত্বপূর্ণ যন্ত্রগুলো কি সবই খুব গুরুভার এবং গুরুতর? নাকি পকেট থেকে হুশ করে বের করে ফেলা কোন কাগজের যন্ত্র দিয়ে দেখে বলে দেওয়া যায় রক্তপরীক্ষার মত কোন গুরুত্বপূর্ণ টেস্টের রিপোর্ট? আসলে এসব ই হল আলোর কারসাজি। https://bigyan.org.in/2015/12/14/foldscope/--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bigyan-podcast/message

4mins

16 Nov 2020

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Manu Prakash (Part 2): Dinner Table Microscopy, (Not) Knowing It All, and Science Education

All Things Photonics

Part 2 of our conversation with MacArthur Fellow Manu Prakash, who takes us inside his lab at Stanford and sheds light on the value of all that we don’t know. Episode 3 concludes with Sujatha Ramanujan, managing director of the Luminate Accelerator, and an assurance that there is no better time to innovate in our field of photonics.Sponsored by:COMSOL - www.comsol.comPhotonics Spectra Conference - www.PhotonicsSpectraConference.com All Things Photonics is produced by Photonics Media and airs bi-weekly on Tuesdays. Find links to the stories mentioned in the episode on our website, www.photonics.com/podcast.

41mins

20 Oct 2020

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Manu Prakash (Part 1): Frugal Science, for Love of the Mundane, and 1 Million Foldscopes (and Counting)

All Things Photonics

Frugal science and the Foldscope microscope are among the topics we discuss with Manu Prakash, in part 1 of our multiweek conversation with the Unilever Colworth Prize recipient and MacArthur Fellow, who joins us from Stanford University. Prakash recounts the road to putting high-level microscopes in the hands of more than 1 million users around the world, as well as his earliest scientific memories. We also explore science’s role in our current global pandemic situation and how a problem-solving mentality extends beyond the laboratory. Season 2, Episode 2, concludes with a look at how a most unusual material spins a stronger optical lens.Sponsored by:COMSOL - www.comsol.comMKS Instruments - www.newport.com All Things Photonics is produced by Photonics Media and airs bi-weekly on Tuesdays. Find links to the stories mentioned in the episode on our website, www.photonics.com/podcast.

36mins

6 Oct 2020

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Manu Prakash: How to beat a pandemic on a budget

The Future of Everything presented by Stanford Engineering

Manu Prakash was in France when COVID-19 took hold throughout the world. There, the Stanford bioengineer, famous for “frugal science” like his $1 field microscope made of paper, witnessed the challenges a relatively well-resourced nation experienced holding back the disease. His head was soon filled with visions of the nightmare awaiting developing nations, given that a COVID-19 test in developing countries can cost as much as $400.In a flurry, Prakash jotted down an engineering manifesto of sorts for a worldwide revolution in open-source, inexpensive healthcare solutions. As he saw it, here were three areas of greatest need — diagnostics, protective equipment and critical care.From his lab at Stanford, Prakash, his students and partners in academia, industry and government around the world led a frenzy of invention that yielded an array of transformative products in just months. There was the electricity-free COVID-19 test based on a simple children’s flashlight. There was Pneumask, a full-face, reusable N95 protective equipment for caregivers inspired by the mask Prakash uses in one of his favorite pastimes, snorkeling. And then there was the “N95 factory in a box” Prakash and his lab developed using cotton candy machines to spin N95-quality filtration materials from waste plastics. Finally, to tackle one of the most technical challenges of all, he built a global consortium with manufacturing partners in India, Kenya and Nepal to design an open-source full-feature ICU ventilator, known as Pufferfish (Prakash has a penchant for naming products after marine life) — bringing a low-cost critical care solution to the world. 

27mins

26 Aug 2020

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E123 | Manu Prakash: How to beat a pandemic on a budget

Stanford Radio

The Future of Everything with Russ Altman:E123 | Manu Prakash: How to beat a pandemic on a budgetA prolific inventor of low-cost, high-impact healthcare devices recently set his sights on COVID-19.Manu Prakash was in France when COVID-19 took hold throughout the world. There, the Stanford bioengineer, famous for “frugal science” like his $1 field microscope made of paper, witnessed the challenges a relatively well-resourced nation experienced holding back the disease. His head was soon filled with visions of the nightmare awaiting developing nations, given that a COVID-19 test in developing countries can cost as much as $400.In a flurry, Prakash jotted down an engineering manifesto of sorts for a worldwide revolution in open-source, inexpensive healthcare solutions. As he saw it, here were three areas of greatest need — diagnostics, protective equipment and critical care.From his lab at Stanford, Prakash, his students and partners in academia, industry and government around the world led a frenzy of invention that yielded an array of transformative products in just months. There was the electricity-free COVID-19 test based on a simple children’s flashlight. There was Pneumask, a full-face, reusable N95 protective equipment for caregivers inspired by the mask Prakash uses in one of his favorite pastimes, snorkeling. And then there was the “N95 factory in a box” Prakash and his lab developed using cotton candy machines to spin N95-quality filtration materials from waste plastics. Finally, to tackle one of the most technical challenges of all, he built a global consortium with manufacturing partners in India, Kenya and Nepal to design an open-source full-feature ICU ventilator, known as Pufferfish (Prakash has a penchant for naming products after marine life) — bringing a low-cost critical care solution to the world. In August, Prakash discussed these innovations with Russ Altman, a fellow bioengineering professor and the host of Stanford Engineering’s The Future of Everything podcast. Listen here.

27mins

26 Aug 2020

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88: Manu Prakash - Democratising science

Seedpod

This weeks guest Manu Prakash,  who I met at the design Indaba earlier this year, did his master’s and PhD in applied physics at MIT before founding the Prakash Lab at Stanford. “Manu works at the molecular scale to literally try and understand how the world really works. he is the co-inventor of the Foldscope and co-founder of Foldscope Instruments. Manu is dedicated towards inventing and distributing “frugal science” tools to democratize access to science , diagnostics of deadly diseases like malaria and convening global citizen science communities to tackle planetary scale environmental challenges such as mosquito surveillance or plankton surveillance by citizen sailors mapping the oceanThe Foldscope is an idea that's more relevant now than ever. We are in my mind seeing the decentralisation of power on so many spheres and this is yet another. As we discuss in our conversation there has been a big loss of trust in science today because the funding system often builds in biases which are hard to overlook. Manu has the goal of democratising science through making it accessible to everyone which I find  a thrilling and powerful idea. You can’t argue against something that is proven by hundreds or thousands of people. The recent months have shown again how polarised and distrustful many people are in science and for good reason, but with people like Manu pioneering projects like Foldscope, there is hope. Listen to our conversation to find out more.

27mins

30 Jun 2020

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Inventor Manu Prakash: Everyone Deserves 'Access to the Microscopic World'

One-on-One with Eric Topol

The Foldscope, Paperfuge, and Octopi are inexpensive diagnostic tools that Manu Prakash and his team have invented to improve the lives of people around the world.

31mins

20 Nov 2019

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Manu Prakash - Inventor and Professor at Stanford University

Stroke of Genius

In this episode, join us as we explore curiosity-driven science with Dr. Manu Prakash. Dr. Prakash is a Professor of Bioengineering at Stanford University who strives to create opportunities for limited resource communities all over the globe. His invention the Foldscope, an origami microscope, costs just $1.75 and allows people all over the world to explore their curiosity through science! Learn more about Manu PrakashThe Prakash Lab website: http://web.stanford.edu/group/prakash-lab/cgi-bin/labsite/The Foldscope Patent: https://patents.google.com/patent/US9696535B2The Foldscope Community: https://www.foldscope.com/aBuzz: https://stanford.io/2WWxsJb See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

20mins

22 Jul 2019

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Manu Prakash on the power of observation, curiosity-driven science, and physical biology

Luminary

Manu Prakash is a physical biologist, inventor, and associate professor of BioEngineering at Stanford University. Manu was awarded the McArthur fellowship in 2016 and has received numerous other prestigious awards. His research is driven by curiosity, empathy for solving challenges in underserved communities, and a passion for democratizing access to science. In this episode, we cover: his philosophy around curiosity-driven science and the power of observation, trends in bioengineering, the water-droplet computer, and the (Anti) Gravity Machine, which answers questions about life in the ocean. We also discuss the idea behind frugal science and his Foldscope and Paperfuge inventions, and why democratizing access to science is a global imperative. Podcast Transcript About and from Prof. Manu Prakash: Website: https://profiles.stanford.edu/manu-prakashWikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manu_Prakash MacArthur Fellow: https://www.macfound.org/fellows/965Twitter: https://twitter.com/PrakashLabReading Recommendation: Exploring Curvature by James Comey (https://www.amazon.com/Exploring-Curvature-James-Casey/dp/3528064757) Assorted links: Curiosity-Driven Science – http://web.stanford.edu/group/prakash-lab/cgi-bin/labsite Frugal Science: https://125.stanford.edu/frugal-science/Wildly frugal: http://web.stanford.edu/group/prakash-lab/cgi-bin/labsite/research/frugal-science-and-global-health/Philosophy of Frugal Science: https://www.hhmi.org/stories/qa-manu-prakash-philosophy-frugal-science Foldscope Instruments: www.foldscope.comTED Talk (A 50-cent microscope that folds like origami): https://www.ted.com/talks/manu_prakash_a_50_cent_microscope_that_folds_like_origami TED Talk (Lifesaving scientific tools made of paper) : https://www.ted.com/talks/manu_prakash_lifesaving_scientific_tools_made_of_paper Computing with Fluids: https://ee.stanford.edu/event/general/computing-fluidsTED Archive (Computing with fluids): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OhroLzvW-JI“A question of taste”: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3814136 Luminary Podcast: Visit us:  https://www.luminary.fmFollow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/luminaryfmLuminary on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/luminary-fm Music: Music used in this podcast: Simplex Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com): Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0 Chipper Doodle Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com): Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

1hr 10mins

8 Jul 2019

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E35 | Manu Prakash: The physics of biology

Stanford Radio

The Future of Everything with Russ Altman""Manu Prakash: The physics of biology"In this episode of The Future of Everything radio show, bioengineer Manu Prakash discusses how he uses physics to explore the way life functions at the microscopic level.Originally aired on SiriusXM on February 10, 2018.

28mins

12 Feb 2018

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