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Jeremy Dutcher

19 Podcast Episodes

Latest 4 Feb 2023 | Updated Daily

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Jeremy Dutcher

Through The Fire

Jeremy Dutcher is a performer, composer, activist, and musicologist. His music transcends boundaries: unapologetically playful in its incorporation of classical influences, full of reverence for the traditional songs of his home, and teeming with the urgency of modern-day struggles of resistance.A member of Tobique First Nation in New Brunswick, Jeremy first did music studies in Halifax before working in the archives at the Canadian Museum of History, painstakingly transcribing Wolastoq songs from 1907 wax cylinders. Jeremy heard ancestral voices singing forgotten songs and stories that had been taken from the Wolastoqiyik generations ago. As he listened to each recording, he felt his own musical impulses stirring from deep within. Long days at the archives turned into long nights at the piano, feeling out melodies and phrases, deep in dialogue with the voices of his ancestors.These "collaborative" compositions appear on his debut LP Wolastoqiyik Lintuwakonawa. Delicate, sublime vocal melodies ring out atop piano lines that cascade through a vibrant range of emotions. The anguish and joy of the past erupt fervently into the present through Jeremy's bold approach to composition and raw, affective performances enhanced by his outstanding tenor techniques.Read more about Jermey Dutcher and connect with his social accounts HERE.

38mins

18 Oct 2022

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Jeremy Dutcher & John Leroux

Xing The Gap, with Rick Miller

Rick speaks with 2 multi-talented, multi-disciplinary guests from the Maritimes, Jeremy Dutcher and John Leroux. Jeremy is a Polaris Prize and Juno Award-winning performer, composer, activist, and member of Tobique First Nation in New Brunswick. He's an outspoken advocate for Indigenous and LGBTQ+ issues, and his first album Wolastoqiyik Lintuwakonawa bridges all kinds of gaps. John Leroux, a GenXer, also hails from New Brunswick, and is not only the Curator at the Beaverbrook Art Gallery in Fredericton, but an architect, PhD art historian, Rick's very good friend, and (Johnny’s words) a “very poor runner”. It's a super-lively chat that coversHow art connects usTwo-spirited (identities)Including everyone in the circleBeing yourself onstageLosing languages  Curating inclusionCourageous conversationsJesus Christ SuperstarAnd where to put your Juno.#BuildBridgesNotWallsXingTheGap.comBoomTheShow.comRickMiller.caig: @xingthegaptw: @rickmilleractorjeremydutcher.comig: @jdutchermusictw: @jdutchermusicbeaverbrookartgallery.orgig: @curatorlerouxtw: @JohnnyLeroux1

34mins

11 Apr 2022

Similar People

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S3 E13: Singing Truth to Power with Jeremy Dutcher

Chosen Family

Thomas and Tranna are joined by the brilliant performer, composer, activist, and musicologist, Jeremy Dutcher, whose debut album, Wolastoqiyik Lintuwakonawa, won the 2018 Polaris Prize. In this deep and illuminating conversation, Jeremy talks about the connections between music and ancestry, reconciliation, and the spirituality of queerness. Also on the show: Thomas talks about the end of his relationship with his therapist and Obsessions is all about a fashion show gone wrong and an epic novel.

35mins

9 Sep 2021

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[Full episode] Alanis Morissette, Jeremy Dutcher

Q with Tom Power

Alanis Morissette discusses the 25th anniversary of her hit album Jagged Little Pill, plus her latest release, Such Pretty Forks in the Road. Jeremy Dutcher explains why making his debut album was as much about saving the Wolostoq language from extinction as it was about reimagining the songs of his ancestors.

59mins

6 Sep 2021

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48. Jeremy Dutcher

The Radical with Nick Terzo

While working on a student research project, anthropologist and musicologist Jeremy Dutcher came across a vast archive of his indigenous peoples' songs recorded on hundred year old wax cylinders. That incredible discovery set him on a life-changing path of cultural education, identity politics, and the creation of "Wolastoqiyik Lintuwakonawa", his Polaris Prize and Juno Award winning debut album. Join Nick as he and Jeremy discuss the preservation of native heritage, touring Canada with an orchestra, and celebrating the intersection of cultural and identity issues. HIGHLIGHTS: [01:43] What began as a college musicology research project evolved over many years into Jeremy's debut album [03:01] In the early 1900s an anthropologist lived with Jeremy's people and recorded their songs on wax cylinders [04:51] After discovering this treasure trove of cultural records, Jeremy set out to take the information out of the university and back to his people [08:10] Jeremy's desire to create music that spoke to indigenous people was because he didn't see himself reflected in modern music [10:15] Jeremy became much more aware of his history and his culture through reviewing his people's archives [11:11] Jeremy explains how his people's language describes the area where they live in Canada [13:10] Jeremy sees the solidarity of indigenous people reaching across any arbitrary man-made borders [14:35] Jeremy's path through life led him from curiosity about his culture to celebrating his heritage through music [15:27] Jeremy examines how entities like Canada and America, that were designed on top of existing places, made efforts to erase the presence of the peoples that were there first [18:43] The preservation and celebration of his heritage, culture and language has given Jeremy a new direction in his life [20:53] Up until twenty five years ago, there was no writing system for Jeremy's language, a new system his mother learned only two years ago [23:19] Jeremy walks Nick through the pronunciation of the title of his album, "Wolastoqiyik Lintuwakonawa", which means "Our Maliseet Songs" [24:38] Jeremy's solitary musical project suddenly became a part of the wider world, winning accolades and making the public aware of Jeremy's culture [25:54] Jeremy explains that the songs of indigenous people aren't entertainment, they're the history and the stories and the laws of their civilization that were collected over hundreds of years [27:06] Jeremy uses his performances to express both indigenous and identity issues, celebrating the intersection of cultural and sexual ideology and politics [29:30] Jeremy recorded his new album in Toronto, expanding his sound with choirs and big orchestral arrangements [32:14] Before the pandemic, Jeremy went on tour throughout Canada, performing his album with an orchestra [35:13] Jeremy would love to share his music and his culture with the native and non-native people of "Turtle Island" (what his people call America) [37:16] Jeremy considers himself more of an arranger than a composer, putting contemporary flair to the traditional music of his people Thanks for listening! Tune in next week and don’t forget to take a minute to review the podcast. In this incredibly competitive podcasting world, every piece of feedback helps. Follow our social media channels for last-minute announcements and guest reveals @theradicalpod on Instagram and Facebook. Find out more about today’s guest, Jeremy Dutcher. Find out more about your host, Nick Terzo MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE: @arcadefire @BuffyStMarie @PolarisPrize @TheJUNOAwards

39mins

16 Jul 2021

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Jeremy Dutcher

Myles From Home

Jeremy Dutcher - A once-in-a-generation artist with an extraordinarily keen intellect and incredibly open heart. His perspective on - and knowledge of - Indigenous culture, language and how they fit in the world today is amazing.  Getting to have this chat was a real honour. This conversation was first broadcast on YouTube Live as a Myles From Home special. Check out his website at www.jeremydutcher.com

1hr 6mins

16 Feb 2021

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Episode 8: Jeremy Dutcher

Native Artist by INDIGEFI

Performer, composer, activist, musicologist — these roles are all infused into his art and way of life. His music, too, transcends boundaries: unapologetically playful in its incorporation of classical influences, full of reverence for the traditional songs of his home,and teeming with the urgency of modern-day struggles of resistance.A member of Tobique First Nation in New Brunswick, Jeremy first did music studies in Halifax before taking a chance to work in the archives at the Canadian Museum of History, painstakingly transcribing Wolastoq songs from 1907 wax cylinders. “Many of the songs I’d never heard before, because our musical tradition on the East Coast was suppressed by the Canadian Government’s Indian Act.” Jeremy heard ancestral voices singing forgotten songs and stories that had been taken from the Wolastoqiyik generations ago.As he listened to each recording, he felt his own musical impulses stirring from deep within. Long days at the archives turned into long nights at the piano, feeling out melodies and phrases, deep in dialogue with the voices of his ancestors. These “collaborative”compositions, collected together on his debut LP Wolastoqiyik Lintuwakonawa, are like nothing you’ve ever heard. Delicate, sublime vocal melodies ring out atop piano lines that cascade through a vibrant range of emotions. The anguish and joy of the past erupt fervently into the present through Jeremy’s bold approach to composition and raw, affective performances enhanced by his outstanding tenor techniques.“I’m doing this work because there’s only about a hundred Wolastoqey speakers left,” he says. “It’s crucial for us to make sure that we’re using our language and passing it on to the next generation. If you lose the language, you’re not just losing words; you’re losing an entire way of seeing and experiencing the world from a distinctly indigenous perspective.”

29mins

6 Jul 2020

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The Best of Atlantic Voice: An Interview with Polaris Prize winner Jeremy Dutcher from 2019

Atlantic Voice

My feature interview with outstanding New Brunswick musician Jeremy Dutcher. We originally aired this interview right after he won the coveted Polaris Prize for his album Wolastoqiyik Lintuwakonawa.The songs feature Jeremy‘s vocals and piano mixed with the archival voices of his ancestors singing from wax cylinders. With fewer than 100 speakers left of the Wolastoqiyik language, Dutcher is bringing his culture to a new younger audience. I started our discussion asking Jeremy how he discovered the song archives.

26mins

2 May 2020

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In conversation with Jeremy Dutcher

The Pulse

Toronto-based musician and composer Jeremy Dutcher discusses his debut album Wolastoqiyik Lintuwakonawa and explores the importance of preserving Indigenous language and culture. This is the February 13, 2020 episode.

21mins

13 Feb 2020

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Woodford Folk Festival, Phina Hartson, Digi Youth Arts, Mission Songs Project, Constantina Bush, Jeremy Dutcher

Thursday Breakfast

Acknowledgment of country Carly speaks with Phina Hartson - the first Pacific trans Fa'afafine person to be admitted as a lawyer in so-called Australia. Alethea Beetson, Mervyn Trescott, Loki Liddle and Kane Brunjies talk about their experiences of being a part of Digi Youth Arts and the incredible sound installation and clapstick performances curated for the festival. Carly converses with Jessie Lloyd from the Mission Songs Project. Jessie speaks deeply about her love for reviving intergenerational song traditions. Kamahi Djordon King, aka Constantina Bush, speaks with Carly about living under the Northern Territory intervention and the uplifting power of humour.  Monica from 4EB and Carly converse with Jeremy Dutcher, classically trained operatic tenor and composer who takes every opportunity to blend his Wolastoq First Nations roots into his music. Jeremy speaks about his process of incorporating 1900s wax cylinder field recordings into his music, the turbulent nature of the pop industry and this period of Indigenous renaissance.  Songs Better in Blak - Thelma Plum Mission Songs Project at the Melbourne Recital CentreMehcinut - Jeremy Dutcher

15 Jan 2020

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