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Rebecca Turner Podcasts

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12 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Rebecca Turner. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Rebecca Turner, often where they are interviewed.

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12 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Rebecca Turner. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Rebecca Turner, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Rebecca Turner

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We talk to Rebecca Turner this week. She’s bounced around the country, met some great people, and turned those experiences into a new album with an old soul. She’s pretty open about her performance anxiety and some of the difficulties of being an indie artist. Follow her on social media. Follow us @performanceanx on Twitter & IG. Subscribe, rate, review, & spread the word. And here is Rebecca Turner
Nov 29 2019 · 45mins
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Registered dietician, author, radio and tv personality Rebecca Turner - Part 2

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Rebecca is a best selling Author, registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN), radio host, television presenter, and a certified specialist in sports dietetics (CSSD) with the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Rebecca Turner zealously spreads the message of her published book, Mind Over Fork, which aims to enlighten the reader that as you think, so you eat. (Proverbs 23:7)

Weekdays, you will find Rebecca Turner hosting her statewide talk radio show, Good Things with Rebecca Turner, on SuperTalk Mississippi. 

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Rebecca Turner graduated from the University of Southern Mississippi with both a bachelor and master of science degree in nutrition and food systems. In 2012, she was awarded the Mississippi Recognized Young Dietitian of the Year and received the Circle of Excellence Award from SUDIA in 2014. 

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When Rebecca Turner is not on your radio or TV spreading a message of well-being and spotlighting the good things, you'll find her testing her physical abilities. After accomplishing two marathons, dozens of half-marathons, and countless 5K, Rebecca Turner has turned to the weight room to challenge her inner and outer strength.

Rebecca Turner joined Coaches Mike McElroy and Jeremy Jungling on the podcast to discuss all things nutrition, fitness and training, finding your why, and much more.

Rebecca offers so much fantastic information and discussion that this episode had to be split into two portions.

Nov 17 2018 · 55mins

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Episode artwork

Registered dietician, author, radio and tv personality Rebecca Turner - Part 1

Play
Read more

Rebecca is a best selling Author, registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN), radio host, television presenter, and a certified specialist in sports dietetics (CSSD) with the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Rebecca Turner zealously spreads the message of her published book, Mind Over Fork, which aims to enlighten the reader that as you think, so you eat. (Proverbs 23:7)

Weekdays, you will find Rebecca Turner hosting her statewide talk radio show, Good Things with Rebecca Turner, on SuperTalk Mississippi. 

-----------------------

Rebecca Turner graduated from the University of Southern Mississippi with both a bachelor and master of science degree in nutrition and food systems. In 2012, she was awarded the Mississippi Recognized Young Dietitian of the Year and received the Circle of Excellence Award from SUDIA in 2014. 

-----------------------

When Rebecca Turner is not on your radio or TV spreading a message of well-being and spotlighting the good things, you'll find her testing her physical abilities. After accomplishing two marathons, dozens of half-marathons, and countless 5K, Rebecca Turner has turned to the weight room to challenge her inner and outer strength.

Rebecca Turner joined Coaches Mike McElroy and Jeremy Jungling on the podcast to discuss all things nutrition, fitness and training, finding your why, and much more.

Rebecca offers so much fantastic information and discussion that this episode had to be split into two portions. Check out part 2 for the entire episode! 

Nov 17 2018 · 54mins
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JSJ 266 NPM 5.0 with Rebecca Turner

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On today’s episode of JavaScript Jabber, Charles Max Wood and panelist Joe Eames chat with Rebecca Turner, tech lead for NPM, a popular Javascript package manager with the worlds largest software registry. Learn about the newly released NPM 5 including a few of the updated features. Stay tuned!

[1:58] Was the release of node JS 8 tied to NPM5?
  • Features in NPM5 have been in planning for 2 years now.
  • Planned on getting it out earlier this year.
  • Node 8 was coming out and got pushed out a month.
  • Putting NPM5 into Node 8 became doable.
  • Pushed really hard to get NPM5 into Node 8 so that users would get NPM5 and updates to NPM5.
[2:58] Why would it matter? NPM doesn’t care right?
  • Right you can use NPM5 with any version of node.
  • Most people don’t update NPM, but upgrade Node.
  • So releasing them together allowed for when people updated Node they would get NPM 5.
[3:29] How does the upgrade process work if you’re using NVM or some node version manager?
  • Depends. Different approaches for each
  • NVM gets a fresh copy of Node with new globals. NVM5 and Node 8 are bundled.
  • For some, If you manually upgrade NVM you’ll always have to manually. It will keep the one you manually upgraded to.
[4:16] Why NPM 5?
  • It’s night and day faster.
  • 3 to 5 times speed up is not uncommon.
  • Most package managers are slow.
  • NPM 5 is still growing. Will get even faster.
[5:18] How did you make it faster?
  • The NPM’s cache is old. It’s very slow. Appalling slow.
  • Rewrote cache
  • Saw huge performance gains
[5:49] What is the function of the cache?
  • Cache makes it so you don’t have to reinstall modules from the internet.
  • It has registry information too.
  • It will now obey http headers for timing out cache.
[6:50] Other things that made it faster?
  • Had a log file for a long time. It was called shrinkwrap.
  • NPM 5 makes it default.
  • Renamed it to packagelog.json
  • Exactly like shrinkwrap package file seen before
  • In combo with cache, it makes it really fast.
  • Stores information about what the tree should look like and it’s general structure.
  • It doesn’t have to go back and learn versions of packages.
[7:50] Can you turn the default Packagelog.json off?
  • Yes. Just:
  • Set packagelog=false in the npmrc
[8:01] Why make it default? Why wasn’t it default before?
  • It Didn’t have it before. Shrinkwrap was added as a separate project enfolded in NPM and wasn’t core to the design of NPM.
  • Most people would now benefit from it. Not many scenarios where you wouldn’t want one.
  • Teams not using the same tools causes headaches and issues.
[9:38] Where does not having a lock show up as a problem?
  • It records the versions of the packages installed and where NPM put them so that when you clone a project down you will have exactly the same versions across machines.
  • Collaborators have the exact same version.
  • Protects from issues after people introduce changes and patch releases.
  • NPM being faster is just a bonus.
  • Store the sha512 of the package that was installed in the glock file so that we can verify it when you install. It’s Bit for bit what you had previously.
[11:12] Could you solve that by setting the package version as the same version as the .Json file?
  • No. That will lock down the versions of the modules that you install personally, not the dependancies, or transitive dependancies.
  • Package log allows you to look into the head of the installer. This is what the install looks like.
[12:16] Defaulting the log file speed things up? How?
  • It doesn’t have to figure out dependences or the tree which makes it faster.
  • Shrinkwrap command is still there, it renames it to shrinkwrap but shrinkwrap cannot be published.
  • For application level things or big libraries, using shrinkwrap to lock down versions is popular.
[13:42] You’ve Adopted specifications in a ROC process. When did you guys do that?
  • Did it in January
  • Have been using them internally for years. Inviting people into the process.
  • Specifications
  • Written in the form of “Here is the problem and here are the solutions.”
  • Spec folder in NPM docs, things being added to that as they specify how things work.
  • Spec tests have been great.
[14:59] The update adds new tools. Will there be new things in registry as well?
  • Yes.
  • Information about a package from registry, it returns document that has info about every version and package json data and full readme for every version.
  • It gets very large.
  • New API to request smaller version of that document.
  • Reduces bandwidth, lower download size, makes it substantially faster.
  • Used to be hashed with sha1, With this update it will be hashed with sha512 as well as sha1 for older clients.
[16:20] Will you be stopping support for older versions?
  • LTS version of NPM was a thing for a while. They stopped doing that.
  • Two models, people either use whatever version came with Node or they update to the latest.
  • The NPM team is really small. Hard to maintain old NPM branches.
  • Supports current versions and that’s pretty much it.
  • If there are big problems they will fix old versions. Patches , etc.
[17:36] Will there ever be problems with that?
  • Older versions should continue to work. Shouldn’t break any of that.
  • Can’t upgrade from 0.8.
  • It does break with different Node version
  • Does not support Node versions 0.10 or 0.12.
[18:47] How do you upgrade to NPM?
  • sudo npm install -gmpm
  • Yes, you may not need sudo. depend on what you’re on.
[19:07] How long has it been since version 4?
  • Last October is when it came out.
[19:24] Do you already have plans for version 6?
  • Yes!
  • More releases than before coming up.
  • Finally deprecating old features that are only used in a few packages out of the whole registry.
  • Running tests on getting rid of things.
[20:50] Self healing cache. What is it and why do we want it?
  • Users are sometimes showing up where installs are broken and tarbols are corrupted.
  • This happens sometimes with complicated containerization setups makes it more likely. It’s unclear where the problem actually is.
  • CaCache - content addressable cache. Take the hash of your package and use it to look up address to look it up in the cache.
  • Compares the Tarbol using an address to look it up in the cache.
  • Compares to see if it’s old. Trashes old and downloads updated one.
  • Came out with the cache. Free side effect of the new cache.
[23:14] New information output as part of the update?
  • NPM has always gave back you the tree from what you just installed.
  • Now, trees can be larger and displaying that much information is not useful.
  • User patch - gives you specifically what you asked for.
  • Information it shows will be something like: “I installed 50 items, updated 7, deleted 2.”
[24:23] Did you personally put that together?
  • Yes, threw it together and then got feedback from users and went with it.
  • Often unplanned features will get made and will be thrown out to get feedback.
  • Another new things ls output now shows you modules that were deduped. Shows logical tree and it’s relationships and what was deduped.
[25:27] You came up to node 4 syntax. Why not go to node 8?
  • To allow people with just node 4 be able to use NPM.
  • Many projects still run Node 4. Once a project has been deployed, people generally don’t touch it.
[26:20] Other new features? What about the File Specifier?
  • File specifier is new. File paths can be in package json, usually put inside pointing to something inside your package.
  • It will copy from there to your node modules.
  • Just a node module symlink.
  • Much faster. Verifiable that what’s in your node modules matches the source. If it’s pointing at the right place it’s correct. If not, then it’s not.
  • Earlier, sometimes it was hard to tell.
[27:38] Anything else as part of the NPM 5 release? Who do you think will be most affected by it?
  • For the most part, people notice three things:
  • 1st. no giant tree at the end
  • 2nd. Much faster
  • 3rd. Package lock.
[28:14] If it’s locked, how do you update it?
  • Run npm installer and then npm update
  • Used to be scary, but works well now.
  • Updates to latest semver, matches semver to package json to all node modules.
  • Updates package lock at the same time
  • Summary in Git shows what’s changed.
[28:59] Did Yarn come into play with your decisions with this release?
  • The plans have been in play for a long time for this update.
  • Yarn’s inclusion of similar features and the feedback was an indicator that some of the features were valuable.
[29:53] Other plans to incorporate features similar to yarn?
  • Features are already pretty close.
  • There are other alternative package managers out there.
  • PMPM interesting because when it installs it doesn’t copy all the files. It creates hard links.
[30:28] Does PMPM and Yarn use NPM registry?
  • Yes! Other than CNPM. The NPM client used in China.
  • CNPM Registry mirror behind firewall. Have their own client to their registry. Their registry is a copy of ours.
[31:15] What about RNPM?
  • I wouldn’t be surprised.
[31:45] “Won’t you come and say something controversial about your competitor?”
  • We all want it to be collaborative.
  • When we were writing our new cache, we also helped Yarn with their cache and sped things up tremendously.

Picks

Charles

Rush Limbaugh’s children’s books
Tinker Crate
Kiwi Crate
NPM
Episodes on My JS Story.

Joe

Gravity Falls
Board Games

Rebecca

NPX

Funstream

Links to keep up with NPM and Rebecca

Twitter @rebeccaorg
NPMjS on Twitter
blog.npmjs.com

Jun 20 2017 · 40mins

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Barack Obama

Bill Gates

LeBron James

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Melinda Gates

Arnold Schwarzenegger

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JSJ 266 NPM 5.0 with Rebecca Turner

Play
Read more

On today’s episode of JavaScript Jabber, Charles Max Wood and panelist Joe Eames chat with Rebecca Turner, tech lead for NPM, a popular Javascript package manager with the worlds largest software registry. Learn about the newly released NPM 5 including a few of the updated features. Stay tuned!

[1:58] Was the release of node JS 8 tied to NPM5?
  • Features in NPM5 have been in planning for 2 years now.
  • Planned on getting it out earlier this year.
  • Node 8 was coming out and got pushed out a month.
  • Putting NPM5 into Node 8 became doable.
  • Pushed really hard to get NPM5 into Node 8 so that users would get NPM5 and updates to NPM5.
[2:58] Why would it matter? NPM doesn’t care right?
  • Right you can use NPM5 with any version of node.
  • Most people don’t update NPM, but upgrade Node.
  • So releasing them together allowed for when people updated Node they would get NPM 5.
[3:29] How does the upgrade process work if you’re using NVM or some node version manager?
  • Depends. Different approaches for each
  • NVM gets a fresh copy of Node with new globals. NVM5 and Node 8 are bundled.
  • For some, If you manually upgrade NVM you’ll always have to manually. It will keep the one you manually upgraded to.
[4:16] Why NPM 5?
  • It’s night and day faster.
  • 3 to 5 times speed up is not uncommon.
  • Most package managers are slow.
  • NPM 5 is still growing. Will get even faster.
[5:18] How did you make it faster?
  • The NPM’s cache is old. It’s very slow. Appalling slow.
  • Rewrote cache
  • Saw huge performance gains
[5:49] What is the function of the cache?
  • Cache makes it so you don’t have to reinstall modules from the internet.
  • It has registry information too.
  • It will now obey http headers for timing out cache.
[6:50] Other things that made it faster?
  • Had a log file for a long time. It was called shrinkwrap.
  • NPM 5 makes it default.
  • Renamed it to packagelog.json
  • Exactly like shrinkwrap package file seen before
  • In combo with cache, it makes it really fast.
  • Stores information about what the tree should look like and it’s general structure.
  • It doesn’t have to go back and learn versions of packages.
[7:50] Can you turn the default Packagelog.json off?
  • Yes. Just:
  • Set packagelog=false in the npmrc
[8:01] Why make it default? Why wasn’t it default before?
  • It Didn’t have it before. Shrinkwrap was added as a separate project enfolded in NPM and wasn’t core to the design of NPM.
  • Most people would now benefit from it. Not many scenarios where you wouldn’t want one.
  • Teams not using the same tools causes headaches and issues.
[9:38] Where does not having a lock show up as a problem?
  • It records the versions of the packages installed and where NPM put them so that when you clone a project down you will have exactly the same versions across machines.
  • Collaborators have the exact same version.
  • Protects from issues after people introduce changes and patch releases.
  • NPM being faster is just a bonus.
  • Store the sha512 of the package that was installed in the glock file so that we can verify it when you install. It’s Bit for bit what you had previously.
[11:12] Could you solve that by setting the package version as the same version as the .Json file?
  • No. That will lock down the versions of the modules that you install personally, not the dependancies, or transitive dependancies.
  • Package log allows you to look into the head of the installer. This is what the install looks like.
[12:16] Defaulting the log file speed things up? How?
  • It doesn’t have to figure out dependences or the tree which makes it faster.
  • Shrinkwrap command is still there, it renames it to shrinkwrap but shrinkwrap cannot be published.
  • For application level things or big libraries, using shrinkwrap to lock down versions is popular.
[13:42] You’ve Adopted specifications in a ROC process. When did you guys do that?
  • Did it in January
  • Have been using them internally for years. Inviting people into the process.
  • Specifications
  • Written in the form of “Here is the problem and here are the solutions.”
  • Spec folder in NPM docs, things being added to that as they specify how things work.
  • Spec tests have been great.
[14:59] The update adds new tools. Will there be new things in registry as well?
  • Yes.
  • Information about a package from registry, it returns document that has info about every version and package json data and full readme for every version.
  • It gets very large.
  • New API to request smaller version of that document.
  • Reduces bandwidth, lower download size, makes it substantially faster.
  • Used to be hashed with sha1, With this update it will be hashed with sha512 as well as sha1 for older clients.
[16:20] Will you be stopping support for older versions?
  • LTS version of NPM was a thing for a while. They stopped doing that.
  • Two models, people either use whatever version came with Node or they update to the latest.
  • The NPM team is really small. Hard to maintain old NPM branches.
  • Supports current versions and that’s pretty much it.
  • If there are big problems they will fix old versions. Patches , etc.
[17:36] Will there ever be problems with that?
  • Older versions should continue to work. Shouldn’t break any of that.
  • Can’t upgrade from 0.8.
  • It does break with different Node version
  • Does not support Node versions 0.10 or 0.12.
[18:47] How do you upgrade to NPM?
  • sudo npm install -gmpm
  • Yes, you may not need sudo. depend on what you’re on.
[19:07] How long has it been since version 4?
  • Last October is when it came out.
[19:24] Do you already have plans for version 6?
  • Yes!
  • More releases than before coming up.
  • Finally deprecating old features that are only used in a few packages out of the whole registry.
  • Running tests on getting rid of things.
[20:50] Self healing cache. What is it and why do we want it?
  • Users are sometimes showing up where installs are broken and tarbols are corrupted.
  • This happens sometimes with complicated containerization setups makes it more likely. It’s unclear where the problem actually is.
  • CaCache - content addressable cache. Take the hash of your package and use it to look up address to look it up in the cache.
  • Compares the Tarbol using an address to look it up in the cache.
  • Compares to see if it’s old. Trashes old and downloads updated one.
  • Came out with the cache. Free side effect of the new cache.
[23:14] New information output as part of the update?
  • NPM has always gave back you the tree from what you just installed.
  • Now, trees can be larger and displaying that much information is not useful.
  • User patch - gives you specifically what you asked for.
  • Information it shows will be something like: “I installed 50 items, updated 7, deleted 2.”
[24:23] Did you personally put that together?
  • Yes, threw it together and then got feedback from users and went with it.
  • Often unplanned features will get made and will be thrown out to get feedback.
  • Another new things ls output now shows you modules that were deduped. Shows logical tree and it’s relationships and what was deduped.
[25:27] You came up to node 4 syntax. Why not go to node 8?
  • To allow people with just node 4 be able to use NPM.
  • Many projects still run Node 4. Once a project has been deployed, people generally don’t touch it.
[26:20] Other new features? What about the File Specifier?
  • File specifier is new. File paths can be in package json, usually put inside pointing to something inside your package.
  • It will copy from there to your node modules.
  • Just a node module symlink.
  • Much faster. Verifiable that what’s in your node modules matches the source. If it’s pointing at the right place it’s correct. If not, then it’s not.
  • Earlier, sometimes it was hard to tell.
[27:38] Anything else as part of the NPM 5 release? Who do you think will be most affected by it?
  • For the most part, people notice three things:
  • 1st. no giant tree at the end
  • 2nd. Much faster
  • 3rd. Package lock.
[28:14] If it’s locked, how do you update it?
  • Run npm installer and then npm update
  • Used to be scary, but works well now.
  • Updates to latest semver, matches semver to package json to all node modules.
  • Updates package lock at the same time
  • Summary in Git shows what’s changed.
[28:59] Did Yarn come into play with your decisions with this release?
  • The plans have been in play for a long time for this update.
  • Yarn’s inclusion of similar features and the feedback was an indicator that some of the features were valuable.
[29:53] Other plans to incorporate features similar to yarn?
  • Features are already pretty close.
  • There are other alternative package managers out there.
  • PMPM interesting because when it installs it doesn’t copy all the files. It creates hard links.
[30:28] Does PMPM and Yarn use NPM registry?
  • Yes! Other than CNPM. The NPM client used in China.
  • CNPM Registry mirror behind firewall. Have their own client to their registry. Their registry is a copy of ours.
[31:15] What about RNPM?
  • I wouldn’t be surprised.
[31:45] “Won’t you come and say something controversial about your competitor?”
  • We all want it to be collaborative.
  • When we were writing our new cache, we also helped Yarn with their cache and sped things up tremendously.

Picks

Charles

Rush Limbaugh’s children’s books
Tinker Crate
Kiwi Crate
NPM
Episodes on My JS Story.

Joe

Gravity Falls
Board Games

Rebecca

NPX

Funstream

Links to keep up with NPM and Rebecca

Twitter @rebeccaorg
NPMjS on Twitter
blog.npmjs.com

Jun 20 2017 · 40mins
Episode artwork

JSJ 266 NPM 5.0 with Rebecca Turner

Play
Read more

On today’s episode of JavaScript Jabber, Charles Max Wood and panelist Joe Eames chat with Rebecca Turner, tech lead for NPM, a popular Javascript package manager with the worlds largest software registry. Learn about the newly released NPM 5 including a few of the updated features. Stay tuned!

[1:58] Was the release of node JS 8 tied to NPM5?
  • Features in NPM5 have been in planning for 2 years now.
  • Planned on getting it out earlier this year.
  • Node 8 was coming out and got pushed out a month.
  • Putting NPM5 into Node 8 became doable.
  • Pushed really hard to get NPM5 into Node 8 so that users would get NPM5 and updates to NPM5.
[2:58] Why would it matter? NPM doesn’t care right?
  • Right you can use NPM5 with any version of node.
  • Most people don’t update NPM, but upgrade Node.
  • So releasing them together allowed for when people updated Node they would get NPM 5.
[3:29] How does the upgrade process work if you’re using NVM or some node version manager?
  • Depends. Different approaches for each
  • NVM gets a fresh copy of Node with new globals. NVM5 and Node 8 are bundled.
  • For some, If you manually upgrade NVM you’ll always have to manually. It will keep the one you manually upgraded to.
[4:16] Why NPM 5?
  • It’s night and day faster.
  • 3 to 5 times speed up is not uncommon.
  • Most package managers are slow.
  • NPM 5 is still growing. Will get even faster.
[5:18] How did you make it faster?
  • The NPM’s cache is old. It’s very slow. Appalling slow.
  • Rewrote cache
  • Saw huge performance gains
[5:49] What is the function of the cache?
  • Cache makes it so you don’t have to reinstall modules from the internet.
  • It has registry information too.
  • It will now obey http headers for timing out cache.
[6:50] Other things that made it faster?
  • Had a log file for a long time. It was called shrinkwrap.
  • NPM 5 makes it default.
  • Renamed it to packagelog.json
  • Exactly like shrinkwrap package file seen before
  • In combo with cache, it makes it really fast.
  • Stores information about what the tree should look like and it’s general structure.
  • It doesn’t have to go back and learn versions of packages.
[7:50] Can you turn the default Packagelog.json off?
  • Yes. Just:
  • Set packagelog=false in the npmrc
[8:01] Why make it default? Why wasn’t it default before?
  • It Didn’t have it before. Shrinkwrap was added as a separate project enfolded in NPM and wasn’t core to the design of NPM.
  • Most people would now benefit from it. Not many scenarios where you wouldn’t want one.
  • Teams not using the same tools causes headaches and issues.
[9:38] Where does not having a lock show up as a problem?
  • It records the versions of the packages installed and where NPM put them so that when you clone a project down you will have exactly the same versions across machines.
  • Collaborators have the exact same version.
  • Protects from issues after people introduce changes and patch releases.
  • NPM being faster is just a bonus.
  • Store the sha512 of the package that was installed in the glock file so that we can verify it when you install. It’s Bit for bit what you had previously.
[11:12] Could you solve that by setting the package version as the same version as the .Json file?
  • No. That will lock down the versions of the modules that you install personally, not the dependancies, or transitive dependancies.
  • Package log allows you to look into the head of the installer. This is what the install looks like.
[12:16] Defaulting the log file speed things up? How?
  • It doesn’t have to figure out dependences or the tree which makes it faster.
  • Shrinkwrap command is still there, it renames it to shrinkwrap but shrinkwrap cannot be published.
  • For application level things or big libraries, using shrinkwrap to lock down versions is popular.
[13:42] You’ve Adopted specifications in a ROC process. When did you guys do that?
  • Did it in January
  • Have been using them internally for years. Inviting people into the process.
  • Specifications
  • Written in the form of “Here is the problem and here are the solutions.”
  • Spec folder in NPM docs, things being added to that as they specify how things work.
  • Spec tests have been great.
[14:59] The update adds new tools. Will there be new things in registry as well?
  • Yes.
  • Information about a package from registry, it returns document that has info about every version and package json data and full readme for every version.
  • It gets very large.
  • New API to request smaller version of that document.
  • Reduces bandwidth, lower download size, makes it substantially faster.
  • Used to be hashed with sha1, With this update it will be hashed with sha512 as well as sha1 for older clients.
[16:20] Will you be stopping support for older versions?
  • LTS version of NPM was a thing for a while. They stopped doing that.
  • Two models, people either use whatever version came with Node or they update to the latest.
  • The NPM team is really small. Hard to maintain old NPM branches.
  • Supports current versions and that’s pretty much it.
  • If there are big problems they will fix old versions. Patches , etc.
[17:36] Will there ever be problems with that?
  • Older versions should continue to work. Shouldn’t break any of that.
  • Can’t upgrade from 0.8.
  • It does break with different Node version
  • Does not support Node versions 0.10 or 0.12.
[18:47] How do you upgrade to NPM?
  • sudo npm install -gmpm
  • Yes, you may not need sudo. depend on what you’re on.
[19:07] How long has it been since version 4?
  • Last October is when it came out.
[19:24] Do you already have plans for version 6?
  • Yes!
  • More releases than before coming up.
  • Finally deprecating old features that are only used in a few packages out of the whole registry.
  • Running tests on getting rid of things.
[20:50] Self healing cache. What is it and why do we want it?
  • Users are sometimes showing up where installs are broken and tarbols are corrupted.
  • This happens sometimes with complicated containerization setups makes it more likely. It’s unclear where the problem actually is.
  • CaCache - content addressable cache. Take the hash of your package and use it to look up address to look it up in the cache.
  • Compares the Tarbol using an address to look it up in the cache.
  • Compares to see if it’s old. Trashes old and downloads updated one.
  • Came out with the cache. Free side effect of the new cache.
[23:14] New information output as part of the update?
  • NPM has always gave back you the tree from what you just installed.
  • Now, trees can be larger and displaying that much information is not useful.
  • User patch - gives you specifically what you asked for.
  • Information it shows will be something like: “I installed 50 items, updated 7, deleted 2.”
[24:23] Did you personally put that together?
  • Yes, threw it together and then got feedback from users and went with it.
  • Often unplanned features will get made and will be thrown out to get feedback.
  • Another new things ls output now shows you modules that were deduped. Shows logical tree and it’s relationships and what was deduped.
[25:27] You came up to node 4 syntax. Why not go to node 8?
  • To allow people with just node 4 be able to use NPM.
  • Many projects still run Node 4. Once a project has been deployed, people generally don’t touch it.
[26:20] Other new features? What about the File Specifier?
  • File specifier is new. File paths can be in package json, usually put inside pointing to something inside your package.
  • It will copy from there to your node modules.
  • Just a node module symlink.
  • Much faster. Verifiable that what’s in your node modules matches the source. If it’s pointing at the right place it’s correct. If not, then it’s not.
  • Earlier, sometimes it was hard to tell.
[27:38] Anything else as part of the NPM 5 release? Who do you think will be most affected by it?
  • For the most part, people notice three things:
  • 1st. no giant tree at the end
  • 2nd. Much faster
  • 3rd. Package lock.
[28:14] If it’s locked, how do you update it?
  • Run npm installer and then npm update
  • Used to be scary, but works well now.
  • Updates to latest semver, matches semver to package json to all node modules.
  • Updates package lock at the same time
  • Summary in Git shows what’s changed.
[28:59] Did Yarn come into play with your decisions with this release?
  • The plans have been in play for a long time for this update.
  • Yarn’s inclusion of similar features and the feedback was an indicator that some of the features were valuable.
[29:53] Other plans to incorporate features similar to yarn?
  • Features are already pretty close.
  • There are other alternative package managers out there.
  • PMPM interesting because when it installs it doesn’t copy all the files. It creates hard links.
[30:28] Does PMPM and Yarn use NPM registry?
  • Yes! Other than CNPM. The NPM client used in China.
  • CNPM Registry mirror behind firewall. Have their own client to their registry. Their registry is a copy of ours.
[31:15] What about RNPM?
  • I wouldn’t be surprised.
[31:45] “Won’t you come and say something controversial about your competitor?”
  • We all want it to be collaborative.
  • When we were writing our new cache, we also helped Yarn with their cache and sped things up tremendously.

Picks

Charles

Rush Limbaugh’s children’s books
Tinker Crate
Kiwi Crate
NPM
Episodes on My JS Story.

Joe

Gravity Falls
Board Games

Rebecca

NPX

Funstream

Links to keep up with NPM and Rebecca

Twitter @rebeccaorg
NPMjS on Twitter
blog.npmjs.com

Jun 20 2017 · 40mins
Episode artwork

MJS #013: Rebecca Turner

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Welcome to the 13th My JS Story! Today, Charles Max Wood welcomes Rebecca Turner. Rebecca is a CLI programmer at npm, Inc. She has been in the show around two to three years ago in episode 174 and talked about npm 3. Tune in to My JS Story Rebecca Turner to learn more how she got into programming and what she is up to these days!

Apr 13 2017 · 35mins
Episode artwork

MJS #013: Rebecca Turner

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Read more

Welcome to the 13th My JS Story! Today, Charles Max Wood welcomes Rebecca Turner. Rebecca is a CLI programmer at npm, Inc. She has been in the show around two to three years ago in episode 174 and talked about npm 3. Tune in to My JS Story Rebecca Turner to learn more how she got into programming and what she is up to these days!

Apr 13 2017 · 35mins
Episode artwork

MJS #013: Rebecca Turner

Play
Read more

Welcome to the 13th My JS Story! Today, Charles Max Wood welcomes Rebecca Turner. Rebecca is a CLI programmer at npm, Inc. She has been in the show around two to three years ago in episode 174 and talked about npm 3. Tune in to My JS Story Rebecca Turner to learn more how she got into programming and what she is up to these days!

Apr 13 2017 · 35mins
Episode artwork

174 JSJ npm 3 with Rebecca Turner and Forrest Norvell

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Don’t miss out! Sign up for Angular Remote Conf!

02:28 - Forrest Norvell Introduction

02:37 - Rebecca Turner Introduction

03:05 - Why npm 3 Exists and Changes in npm 2 => 3

  • Debugging
  • Life Cycle Ordering
  • Deduplication

08:36 - Housekeeping

09:47 - Peer Dependency Changes

15:38 - The Rewrite Process and How That Enabled Some of the Changes Coming Out

22:50 - shrinkwrapping

27:00 - Other Breaking Changes?

  • Permissions

30:40 - Tiny Jewels

33:24 - Why Rewrite?

36:00 - npm’s Focus on the Front End

42:04 - Transitioning to npm 3

42:54 - Installing npm 3

44:11 - Packaging with io.js and Node.js

45:16 - Being in Beta

Picks

Slack List (Aimee)
Perceived Performance Fluent Conf Talks (Aimee)
Paul Irish: How Users Perceive the Speed of The Web Keynote @ Fluent 2015 (Aimee)
Subsistence Farming (AJ)
Developer On Fire Episode 017 - Charles Max Wood - Get Involved and Try New Things (Chuck)
Elevator Saga (Chuck)
BrazilJS (Forrest)
NodeConf Brazil (Forrest)
For quick testing: `npm init -y`, configure init (Forrest)
Where Can I Put Your Cheese? (Or What to Expect From npm@3) @ Boston Ember, May 2015 (Rebecca)
Open Source & Feelings Conference (Rebecca)
bugs [npm Documentation] (Rebecca)
docs [npm Documentation] (Rebecca)
repo [npm Documentation] (Rebecca)

Aug 26 2015 · 56mins
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