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Palgrave Macmillan Podcasts

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109 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Palgrave Macmillan. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Palgrave Macmillan, often where they are interviewed.

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109 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Palgrave Macmillan. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Palgrave Macmillan, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Filippo Menozzi, "World Literature, Non-Synchronism, and the Politics of Time" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020)

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In World Literature, Non-Synchronism, and the Politics of Time (Palgrave Macmillan) Filippo Menozzi offers to look at literature and literary processes through the prism of non-synchronism.

The book details the notion that Menozzi finds accurate and relevant not only for the analysis of current cultural and political developments, but also for the consideration of the past. Non-synchronism is suggested to subvert the boundaries of time and space that are united and organized through chronologies, imposing and supporting canonical structures. Menozzi asserts that a non-synchronism approach to how we read has political repercussions that can shape the way we navigate the network of political and economic systems.

To demonstrate how the non-synchronism approach helps re-arrange different times, Menozzi draws attention to fiction from Africa and South Asia and focuses on how the change of the temporal perspective can activate textual layers, providing space for the intersection of the local and the global.

Filippo Menozzi (PhD, Kent) is Lecturer in postcolonial and world literature at Liverpool John Moores University, UK.

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Sep 16 2020 · 47mins
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Olli Rehn, "Walking the Highwire: Rebalancing the European Economy in Crisis" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020)

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Walking the Highwire: Rebalancing the European Economy in Crisis (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) tells the story of the Eurozone’s crisis from the perspective of an insider who now sits on the European Central Bank’s governing council.

Part-policy proposal, part-autobiography, and part-political memoir, at the heart of Walking The Highwire are the four critical years from 2010 to 2014 when Olli Rehn served as European Commissioner for economic and monetary affairs.

The book tells us what took a football-mad boy from Southern Savonia to Brussels – via Oxford and Minnesota – and reveals the behind-the-scenes fights and compromises that shaped the crisis and pulled the euro from the brink.

Olli Rehn has been governor of the Bank of Finland since 2018, was Finnish minister of economic affairs (2015-2016), European Commissioner for economic and monetary affairs (2010-2014), and commissioner for enlargement (2004-2010). He holds a doctorate from the University of Oxford in international political economy.

Tim Gwynn Jones is an economic and political-risk analyst at Medley Global Advisors.

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Aug 28 2020 · 55mins
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Raluca Soreanu, "Working-through Collective Wounds: Trauma, Denial, Recognition in the Brazilian Uprising" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018)

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Working-through Collective Wounds: Trauma, Denial, Recognition in the Brazilian Uprising (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018) formulates a theory of collective trauma, drawing on the work of Sándor Ferenczi.

Dr. Soreanu takes Ferenczi into the public square to answer a series of questions. What does it mean to understand the operation of the confusions of tongues at the social level? What are the consequences of imagining the social as an encounter between different registers? And how did we come to postulate the importance, among all social registers, of the tension between the register of recognition and the register of redistribution?

Applying Ferenczian theory to these “interrogations” Soreanu utilizes psychosocial vignettes to make a series of arguments. “Akin to clinical vignettes, their aim is to capture a movement of the libido, or the expression of a symptom, or the resolution of a symptom, or a particular kind of regression, or a kind of dreaming-up that puts some symbols in relation to others.”

In addition to working with established meta-psychologies, Soreanu adds “the pleasure of analogy” to Ferenczi’s emergent ‘vocabulary of pleasure’. This new “doubly relational” pleasure takes us away from the Freudian “insistence on processes of identification” and demonstrates that our epistemologies are “libidinised affairs: they have an erotics.”

At the end of the book, Soreanu answers two questions: What returns to psychoanalysis, after taking Ferenczi to the streets and to the squares, alongside crowds in protest? What returns to social theory, after we have taken Ferenczi to the streets?

Working-through Collective Wounds is part of a series, Studies in the Psychosocial “distinguished by its emphasis on affect, the irrational and unconscious processes, often, but not necessarily, understood psychoanalytically.”

Raluca Soreanu is Reader in Psychoanalytic Studies and Director of Research of the Department of Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies at the University of Essex.

Christopher Russell is a psychoanalyst in Chelsea Manhattan and can be reached at (212) 260-8115

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Jul 20 2020 · 1hr 9mins
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Gerald Epstein, “What's Wrong with Modern Money Theory? A Policy Critique” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019)

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Since the last-but-one financial crisis abated and governments responded to better times by clawing back their stimulus packages, a once-obscure economic philosophy has been gaining a growing following on the left. But, following the extraordinary policy response to the COVID-19 pandemic, even some conservative commentators and policy makers are showing an interest in Modern Monetary Theory or MMT.

Not so fast, warns Gerald Epstein in his What's Wrong with Modern Money Theory? A Policy Critique (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019). While this progressive economist welcomes any resistance to austerian economics and the policy rethink that the new theory is triggering, he warns against MMT's seductive appeal and its significant practical shortcomings.

Gerald Epstein co-directs the Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Tim Jones is an economic and political-risk analyst at Medley Global Advisors (FT Group) in London.

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Jul 13 2020 · 41mins
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Gerald Epstein, “What's Wrong with Modern Money Theory? A Policy Critique” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019)

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Since the last-but-one financial crisis abated and governments responded to better times by clawing back their stimulus packages, a once-obscure economic philosophy has been gaining a growing following on the left. But, following the extraordinary policy response to the COVID-19 pandemic, even some conservative commentators and policy makers are showing an interest in Modern Monetary Theory or MMT.

Not so fast, warns Gerald Epstein in his What's Wrong with Modern Money Theory? A Policy Critique (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019). While this progressive economist welcomes any resistance to austerian economics and the policy rethink that the new theory is triggering, he warns against MMT's seductive appeal and its significant practical shortcomings.

Gerald Epstein co-directs the Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Tim Jones is an economic and political-risk analyst at Medley Global Advisors (FT Group) in London.

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Jul 13 2020 · 41mins
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Matthew McManus, "The Rise of Post-Modern Conservatism" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020)

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The election of Donald Trump in 2016 shocked and surprised a number of commentators, especially because his own attitudes seemed to be in conflict with much of what people often associate with conservatism. Matt McManus argues, however, that Trump and other similar figures and movements represent a new form of conservatism, one with a long history of development, and formed as a response to various social dynamics. The goal of his recent book, ​The Rise of Post-Modern Conservatism: Neoliberalism, Post-Modern Culture, and Reactionary Politics (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020), is to provide a genealogical analysis of this new form of conservative politics.

Matthew McManus received his PhD from the Socio-Legal Studies program at York University, Canada in 2017. He is currently a Visiting Professor of Political Science and International Relations at the University of TEC de Monterrey, Mexico, and is also the author of ​Making Human Dignity Central to International Human Rights Law: A Critical Legal Argument​.

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May 08 2020 · 48mins
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Matthew McManus, "The Rise of Post-Modern Conservatism" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020)

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The election of Donald Trump in 2016 shocked and surprised a number of commentators, especially because his own attitudes seemed to be in conflict with much of what people often associate with conservatism. Matt McManus argues, however, that Trump and other similar figures and movements represent a new form of conservatism, one with a long history of development, and formed as a response to various social dynamics. The goal of his recent book, ​The Rise of Post-Modern Conservatism: Neoliberalism, Post-Modern Culture, and Reactionary Politics (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020), is to provide a genealogical analysis of this new form of conservative politics.

Matthew McManus received his PhD from the Socio-Legal Studies program at York University, Canada in 2017. He is currently a Visiting Professor of Political Science and International Relations at the University of TEC de Monterrey, Mexico, and is also the author of ​Making Human Dignity Central to International Human Rights Law: A Critical Legal Argument​.

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May 08 2020 · 48mins
Episode artwork

Matthew McManus, "The Rise of Post-Modern Conservatism" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020)

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The election of Donald Trump in 2016 shocked and surprised a number of commentators, especially because his own attitudes seemed to be in conflict with much of what people often associate with conservatism. Matt McManus argues, however, that Trump and other similar figures and movements represent a new form of conservatism, one with a long history of development, and formed as a response to various social dynamics. The goal of his recent book, ​The Rise of Post-Modern Conservatism: Neoliberalism, Post-Modern Culture, and Reactionary Politics (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020), is to provide a genealogical analysis of this new form of conservative politics.

Matthew McManus received his PhD from the Socio-Legal Studies program at York University, Canada in 2017. He is currently a Visiting Professor of Political Science and International Relations at the University of TEC de Monterrey, Mexico, and is also the author of ​Making Human Dignity Central to International Human Rights Law: A Critical Legal Argument​.

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May 08 2020 · 48mins
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Jacob Turner, "Robot Rules: Regulating Artificial Intelligence" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018)

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In his new book Robot Rules: Regulating Artificial Intelligence (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018), Jacob Turner explains why AI is unique, what legal and ethical problems it could cause, and how we can address them. It argues that AI is unlike is any other previous technology, owing to its ability to take decisions independently and unpredictably. This gives rise to three issues: responsibility―who is liable if AI causes harm; rights―the disputed moral and pragmatic grounds for granting AI legal personality; and the ethics surrounding the decision-making of AI. The book suggests that in order to address these questions we need to develop new institutions and regulations on a cross-industry and international level. Incorporating clear explanations of complex topics, Robot Rules will appeal to a multi-disciplinary audience, from those with an interest in law, politics and philosophy, to computer programming, engineering and neuroscience.

John Danaher is a lecturer the National University of Ireland, Galway. He is also the host of the wonderful podcast Philosophical Disquisitions. You can find it here on Apple Podcasts.

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Mar 12 2020 · 1hr 16mins
Episode artwork

Jacob Turner, "Robot Rules: Regulating Artificial Intelligence" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018)

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In his new book Robot Rules: Regulating Artificial Intelligence (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018), Jacob Turner explains why AI is unique, what legal and ethical problems it could cause, and how we can address them. It argues that AI is unlike is any other previous technology, owing to its ability to take decisions independently and unpredictably. This gives rise to three issues: responsibility―who is liable if AI causes harm; rights―the disputed moral and pragmatic grounds for granting AI legal personality; and the ethics surrounding the decision-making of AI. The book suggests that in order to address these questions we need to develop new institutions and regulations on a cross-industry and international level. Incorporating clear explanations of complex topics, Robot Rules will appeal to a multi-disciplinary audience, from those with an interest in law, politics and philosophy, to computer programming, engineering and neuroscience.

John Danaher is a lecturer the National University of Ireland, Galway. He is also the host of the wonderful podcast Philosophical Disquisitions. You can find it here on Apple Podcasts.

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Mar 12 2020 · 1hr 16mins
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