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Michael Schmitt Podcasts

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3 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Michael Schmitt. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Michael Schmitt, often where they are interviewed.

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3 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Michael Schmitt. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Michael Schmitt, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Interview with Michael Schmitt (Updated)

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In our 162nd episode of the Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast, Stewart Baker, Michael Vatis, Stephanie Roy, Alan Cohn, and Brian Egan discuss: this is what a risk-averse signals intelligence agency looks like: giving up intelligence to satisfy elite opinion; FCC’s plan for net neutrality emerges; this week in sex toy security: the FTC to the rescue?; remember this story the next time Silicon Valley says the government can’t be trusted with crypto keys because of Snowden; the Russians who hacked Clinton are going after Macron in France, says Trend Micro; this week in vigilante cybersecurity: Flexispy is doxed; Brickerbot secures the IOT by administering “Internet Chemotherapy”; our guest interview is with Michael Schmitt, Professor of Law at the University of Exeter, the US Naval War College, and the US Military Academy at West Point and a leader in the effort to articulate the law of armed conflict in cyberspace known as Talinn 2.0. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not reflect the opinions of the firm.
May 02 2017 · 52mins
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EPISODE 008: Labeling Our Own "God's": Michael Schmitt

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Labels are STUPID!  I hate titles, categories and the boxes we put each other in.  SO many of us have this need to label ourselves and each other.

Far too often we embrace the labels they put on us; we put them on our chests like scarlet letters.  We even put them on other people and miss out on the beauty that's in their life, because we can't see past the label..

I mean, labels work great when you're organizing your junk drawer, but somehow they always fall short when we use them to describe people.

In this episode, Michael (From EPISODE 004) has some questions regarding the void religion fills, the labels we attach to, and what do we fill religion fails to fill the void.

He baits me into discussing theology which I don't want this podcast to be about because theology is another way to label shit.  But we might as well go there since he baited me to it.

LET'S STOP LABELING OTHERS!  DON'T LET THEM LABEL YOU!  

WEBSITE:  www.LosingOurReligion.org

Sep 16 2015 · 1hr 11mins
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EPISODE 004: Coming Out of Both Closets: Michael Schmitt

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What if most of your life you felt like you had to hide?  That if you shared what you really felt, you’d be beaten up? Rejected? Shamed?

What if you knew you could continue to hold in your doubts?  Your secrets?  But for how long?  Could you continue to live a lie just so that others wouldn’t be made to feel uncomfortable by your questioning?  What if you realized you had nothing to fear?  That you could learn to live out in the open, and if those you cared about rejected you, you’d find a way to make it without them?

Losing Our Religion is a show about coming out.  Coming out of the darkness, shame, and fear that religion creates.  This episode, in particular, is a coming out story, for both Michael and I.

What could life be like if you left religion behind and were able to freely be yourself without the fear of rejection, shame, or loneliness?  Maybe it's like this story?

Michael is my friend.  By profession, he is a food scientist.  In this episode, he takes the time to educate us about Scotch.  Using it as an example of what his life has been like while leaving religion.  As well as transparently sharing the story of his coming out as a gay man to his family, friends, and church.  But we both end up coming out.

I am so grateful to Mike for sharing so openly, candidly, and transparently.  He inspired me to as well.

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Aug 19 2015 · 1hr 17mins