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Volodymyr Koman

2 Podcast Episodes

Latest 24 Jul 2021 | Updated Daily

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Cellular-Sized Robots – Dr. Volodymyr Koman, Postdoc, MIT– Innovative Uses for Colloidal State Machines That Could Change Modern Medicine

FutureTech Podcast

In this interesting podcast, Dr. Volodymyr Koman, a postdoc at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, talks about his extensive work with cell-sized robots. After receiving his Ph.D. in Photonics at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Dr. Koman accelerated his research studying and developing cell-sized robots, which he refers to as ‘colloidal state machines.’ As he describes, they are essentially state machines that can perform computations while on board a particle. Dr. Koman talks about their desire to create advanced cell-size ‘state machines’ that have the ability to form tissues and create larger structures. And as these tiny robots can sense their environment, as well as store important data and engage in computational tasks, the possibilities for research and application is tremendous. Structurally, they are comprised of tiny electronic circuits made of two-dimensional materials, and they can, remarkably, communicate while completing tasks. Dr. Koman talks about how these micro-sized robots might be used within the bloodstream, especially in regard to diagnostics, as it could be possible to carry out diagnostic expeditions within the human digestive system. And finally, Dr. Koman discusses the future of robotics and his outlook for these spectacularly small, advanced tiny robots.

33mins

21 May 2019

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Tiny Robots – Dr. Volodymyr Koman, Postdoc at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) – Smaller Than a Cell, the Amazing Possibilities for Colloidal Nanoelectronic State Machines

Finding Genius Podcast

Dr. Volodymyr Koman, a postdoc at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), discusses his work with cell-sized robots and explains their many possible uses in our ever-increasing technological world. Dr. Koman received a BS in Applied Physics from the Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, then an MS in Photonics from Ghent University, before moving on to earn and complete his Ph.D. in Photonics at the prestigious Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne. Dr. Koman has a particular fascination with cell-sized robots and his work is focused in this area currently. Dr. Koman discusses their cell-sized robots and how they arrived at the name of ‘colloidal nanoelectronic state machines’ for their groundbreaking tiny robots. He describes state machines as simple robots with several states on board, essentially state machines that are doing computations on board of the particle. Dr. Koman describes his team’s fascination with nature, which caused them to pose questions such as, can we think like nature? Their work takes the question into the test phase, as they seek to make advanced cell-size ‘state machines’ or robots that can form tissues and create bigger structures.  These minuscule robots can sense their environment, store data, and complete computational tasks. They consist of tiny electronic circuits comprised of two-dimensional materials, riding along atop minuscule particles known as colloids. Dr. Koman explains how these tiny state machines can communicate with each other while completing tasks. He expounds upon their vision for the future of these infinitesimal robots. Dr. Koman provides details on the structures and circuits of their tiny state machines, and how they hope to effectively allow them to transform and change shape. These machines will look very different from our current machines and from our cells, Dr. Koman states.  The cellular-size technology expert provides further information on uses within the bloodstream. One particular area of expansion for the technology could be for diagnostics. By combining these tiny objects with complex circuitry, it may open up possibilities for the creation of devices that could be utilized to carry out diagnostic journeys into the human digestive system. Colloids can exist in environments and move about in ways that other materials simply cannot, which makes them particularly attractive for specialized tasks. Dr. Koman talks about the future of robotics and his team’s outlook for their advanced tiny robots. From bloodstream to tissue, the uses and possibilities are nearly limitless.

33mins

21 May 2019

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