OwlTail

Cover image of Amy Murrell Taylor

Amy Murrell Taylor

10 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Aug 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

Episode artwork

Amy Murrell Taylor: Embattled Freedom

History Tavern Podcast

Emancipation was an uncertain process and one that enslaved people had to pursue throughout the Civil War. Or as Embattled Freedom author Murrell Taylor writes, "Freedom had to searched for and found." In this special re-released episode, listen to my discussion with Amy Murrell Taylor at the 2019 Civi War Institute Summer Conference.

25mins

18 Jun 2021

Episode artwork

Amy Murrell Taylor - Horrors and Healing

Horrors and Healing - The Civil War Medicine Podcast

John Lustrea spoke with Dr. Amy Murrell Taylor about her studies of refugee camps during the Civil War era.  The National Museum of Civil War Medicine is located in Frederick, Maryland. The Museum is the premier center for the preservation and research of the legacy of Civil War Medical innovation and humanitarianism. As a living institution, we utilize artifacts, storytelling and the historic lessons derived from that era to educate the public and define the impact on today’s society. You can learn more about the Museum by visiting civilwarmed.org. You can support this podcast by donating or by becoming a member of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine.  Dr. Amy Murrell Taylor is an associate professor of history at the University of Kentucky. Her research focuses on the social and cultural history of the U.S. South in the 19th century. Her latest book, Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps (UNC Press, 2018), is a study of the many thousands of men, women, and children who fled slavery and sought refuge behind the lines of the Union army during the American Civil War. She previously examined families divided by national loyalties, both the realities of their lives and the images of them in popular culture, in The Divided Family in Civil War America (UNC Press, 2005). She is the co-editor, with Stephen Berry, of the “UnCivil Wars” series with the University of Georgia Press, as well as an editorial advisory board member of the Civil War Monitor magazine and a past member of the board of editors of the Journal of Southern History. She is also involved in a variety of public history and historic preservation projects in central Kentucky.

49mins

18 Sep 2020

Similar People

Episode artwork

August 6, 2020 - Amy Murrell Taylor ('Embattled Freedom' and Confederate Memorials)

Behind the Blue

LEXINGTON, Ky. (August 6, 2020) – The discussions over removal of Confederate memorials in the United States have been some of the more prominent ones in our current cultural landscape. Gaining momentum from other recent social movements that are happening concurrently, from Black Lives Matter to #MeToo and beyond, the focus of these discussions now seems to have widened to include memorials and statues that go well further back than the American Civil War, and beyond the borders of this country. Amy Murrell Taylor, the T. Marshall Hahn Jr. Professor of History at the University of Kentucky, last appeared on Behind the Blue in September of 2017. On this newest episode, Taylor returns to discuss how this movement has progressed over the past three years, and how the University and Lexington are approaching these conversations. “I think Lexington has gotten past the most contentious part of the monument piece of all of this,” says Taylor. “But monuments are just one piece of a much bigger struggle for racial justice.” Taylor also talks about her recent book, “Embattled Freedom: Journeys Through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps”, and its themes of freedom not just coming to people despite the war and its resolution, but that it had to be sought after in the midst of it. "Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university. For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue. To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

37mins

6 Aug 2020

Episode artwork

Episode 125 - Amy Murrell Taylor, Author Of Embattled Freedom

Think Humanities Podcasts

Dr. Amy Murrell Taylor joins host Bill Goodman on THINK HUMANITIES to talk about her book Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps, which was recently awarded the prestigious Frederick Douglass Book Prize.

46mins

25 Mar 2020

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Review of: "Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps," by Amy Murrell Taylor

Regarp BookBlogPod

Review of: "Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps," by Amy Murrell Taylor

9mins

1 Feb 2020

Episode artwork

Rachel Shelden and Amy Murrell Taylor: Washington Brotherhood and Embattled Freedom

History Tavern Podcast

Recorded at the 2019 Civil War Institute Summer Conference on the campus of Gettysburg college, this episode features Dr. Rachel Shelden and Dr. Amy Murrell Taylor. Rachel Sheldon talked about her book Washington Brotherhood: Politics, Social Life, and the Coming of the Civil War. Shelden's book focuses on the personal relationships forged by Washington politicians during the tumultuous 1850s. While much of the country remained divided over slavery, elected officials, insulated by the fraternity-like atmosphere of Congress, failed to recognize the gravity of the secession crisis. Amy Murrell Taylor discussed her brand new book Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War's Slave Refugee Camps. Taylor's book explores the long struggle for freedom many enslaved people faced during the Civil War and the "massive dislocation" the war caused.

43mins

18 Jun 2019

Episode artwork

Amy Murrell Taylor, "Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps" (UNC Press, 2018)

New Books in Military History

The Civil War was just days old when the first enslaved men, women, and children began fleeing their plantations to seek refuge inside the lines of the Union army as it moved deep into the heart of the Confederacy. In the years that followed, hundreds of thousands more followed in a mass exodus from slavery that would destroy the system once and for all. Drawing on an extraordinary survey of slave refugee camps throughout the country, Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps(University of North Carolina Press, 2018) reveals as never before the everyday experiences of these refugees from slavery as they made their way through the vast landscape of army-supervised camps that emerged during the war. Amy Murrell Taylor vividly reconstructs the human world of wartime emancipation, taking readers inside military-issued tents and makeshift towns, through commissary warehouses and active combat, and into the realities of individuals and families struggling to survive physically as well as spiritually. Narrating their journeys in and out of the confines of the camps, Taylor shows in often gripping detail how the most basic necessities of life were elemental to a former slave's quest for freedom and full citizenship.The stories of individuals--storekeepers, a laundress, and a minister among them--anchor this ambitious and wide-ranging history and demonstrate with new clarity how contingent the slaves' pursuit of freedom was on the rhythms and culture of military life. Taylor brings new insight into the enormous risks taken by formerly enslaved people to find freedom in the midst of the nation's most destructive war.Adam McNeil is a PhD student in History, African American Public Humanities Initiative and Colored Conventions Project Fellow at the University of Delaware. He can be reached on Twitter @CulturedModesty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

1hr 1min

29 May 2019

Episode artwork

Amy Murrell Taylor, "Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps" (UNC Press, 2018)

New Books in African American Studies

The Civil War was just days old when the first enslaved men, women, and children began fleeing their plantations to seek refuge inside the lines of the Union army as it moved deep into the heart of the Confederacy. In the years that followed, hundreds of thousands more followed in a mass exodus from slavery that would destroy the system once and for all. Drawing on an extraordinary survey of slave refugee camps throughout the country, Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps(University of North Carolina Press, 2018) reveals as never before the everyday experiences of these refugees from slavery as they made their way through the vast landscape of army-supervised camps that emerged during the war. Amy Murrell Taylor vividly reconstructs the human world of wartime emancipation, taking readers inside military-issued tents and makeshift towns, through commissary warehouses and active combat, and into the realities of individuals and families struggling to survive physically as well as spiritually. Narrating their journeys in and out of the confines of the camps, Taylor shows in often gripping detail how the most basic necessities of life were elemental to a former slave's quest for freedom and full citizenship.The stories of individuals--storekeepers, a laundress, and a minister among them--anchor this ambitious and wide-ranging history and demonstrate with new clarity how contingent the slaves' pursuit of freedom was on the rhythms and culture of military life. Taylor brings new insight into the enormous risks taken by formerly enslaved people to find freedom in the midst of the nation's most destructive war.Adam McNeil is a PhD student in History, African American Public Humanities Initiative and Colored Conventions Project Fellow at the University of Delaware. He can be reached on Twitter @CulturedModesty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

1hr 1min

29 May 2019

Episode artwork

Amy Murrell Taylor, "Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps" (UNC Press, 2018)

New Books in American Studies

The Civil War was just days old when the first enslaved men, women, and children began fleeing their plantations to seek refuge inside the lines of the Union army as it moved deep into the heart of the Confederacy. In the years that followed, hundreds of thousands more followed in a mass exodus from slavery that would destroy the system once and for all. Drawing on an extraordinary survey of slave refugee camps throughout the country, Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps(University of North Carolina Press, 2018) reveals as never before the everyday experiences of these refugees from slavery as they made their way through the vast landscape of army-supervised camps that emerged during the war. Amy Murrell Taylor vividly reconstructs the human world of wartime emancipation, taking readers inside military-issued tents and makeshift towns, through commissary warehouses and active combat, and into the realities of individuals and families struggling to survive physically as well as spiritually. Narrating their journeys in and out of the confines of the camps, Taylor shows in often gripping detail how the most basic necessities of life were elemental to a former slave's quest for freedom and full citizenship.The stories of individuals--storekeepers, a laundress, and a minister among them--anchor this ambitious and wide-ranging history and demonstrate with new clarity how contingent the slaves' pursuit of freedom was on the rhythms and culture of military life. Taylor brings new insight into the enormous risks taken by formerly enslaved people to find freedom in the midst of the nation's most destructive war.Adam McNeil is a PhD student in History, African American Public Humanities Initiative and Colored Conventions Project Fellow at the University of Delaware. He can be reached on Twitter @CulturedModesty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

1hr 1min

29 May 2019

Episode artwork

Amy Murrell Taylor, "Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps" (UNC Press, 2018)

New Books in History

The Civil War was just days old when the first enslaved men, women, and children began fleeing their plantations to seek refuge inside the lines of the Union army as it moved deep into the heart of the Confederacy. In the years that followed, hundreds of thousands more followed in a mass exodus from slavery that would destroy the system once and for all. Drawing on an extraordinary survey of slave refugee camps throughout the country, Embattled Freedom: Journeys through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps(University of North Carolina Press, 2018) reveals as never before the everyday experiences of these refugees from slavery as they made their way through the vast landscape of army-supervised camps that emerged during the war. Amy Murrell Taylor vividly reconstructs the human world of wartime emancipation, taking readers inside military-issued tents and makeshift towns, through commissary warehouses and active combat, and into the realities of individuals and families struggling to survive physically as well as spiritually. Narrating their journeys in and out of the confines of the camps, Taylor shows in often gripping detail how the most basic necessities of life were elemental to a former slave's quest for freedom and full citizenship.The stories of individuals--storekeepers, a laundress, and a minister among them--anchor this ambitious and wide-ranging history and demonstrate with new clarity how contingent the slaves' pursuit of freedom was on the rhythms and culture of military life. Taylor brings new insight into the enormous risks taken by formerly enslaved people to find freedom in the midst of the nation's most destructive war.Adam McNeil is a PhD student in History, African American Public Humanities Initiative and Colored Conventions Project Fellow at the University of Delaware. He can be reached on Twitter @CulturedModesty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

1hr 1min

29 May 2019