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Matt Grossmann

20 Podcast Episodes

Latest 11 Sep 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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102. Matt Grossmann with Steve Scher: How Social Science Got Better

In The Moment podcast

For some it seems that most of the news about academic social sciences—anthropology, economics, political science, etc—is negative. But in response to the criticism he’s seen, political science professor Matt Grossman argues that, far from crisis, social science is undergoing an unparalleled renaissance of ever-broader understanding and application. In this week’s episode, Senior Correspondent Steve Scher talks with Grossman about his defense of the current state of social sciences, captured in his book How Social Science Got Better: Overcoming Bias with More Evidence, Diversity, and Self-Reflection. Grossman shares why he believes that social science research today has never been more relevant, rigorous, or self-reflective—he says scholars have a better idea of their blind spots and biases. With insights from the philosophy, history, and sociology of science, he provides new data on research trends and scholarly views, providing a wide-ranging account that asks us to rethink the critiques and acknowledge the path-breaking advances occurring in the social sciences today. Matt Grossmann is Director of the Institute for Public Policy and Social Research and Professor of Political Science at Michigan State University. He is also Senior Fellow at the Niskanen Center and a Contributor at FiveThirtyEight. He has published analysis in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and Politico and hosts the Science of Politics podcast. He is the author or coauthor of many books, including Asymmetric Politics, Red State Blues, The Not-So-Special Interests, Artists of the Possible, and Campaigns & Elections, as well as dozens of journal articles. Steve Scher is a podcaster, interviewer, and teacher. He worked in Seattle public radio for almost 30 years. He has taught at the University of Washington since 2009. He is Senior Correspondent for Town Hall Seattle’s In The Moment podcast. Buy the Book: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/how-social-science-got-better-9780197518977?cc=us&lang=en& Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation click here. 

50mins

28 Jun 2021

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Matt Grossmann and Curtis Hertel Jr.

City Pulse on the Air on Impact 89FM

On this edition of City Pulse On the Air, editor and publisher Berl Schwartz holds his final discussion on the presidential election with MSU Political Scientist Matt Grossmann. Schwartz also discusses the down-ballot results and their impact on Michigan with Sen. Curtis Hertel Jr. , D-East Lansing.

26mins

18 Nov 2020

Similar People

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Matt Grossmann and Kyle Melinn

City Pulse on the Air on Impact 89FM

On this edition of City Pulse On the Air, editor and publisher Berl Schwartz discusses the election results with MSU Political Scientist Matt Grossmann and MIRS reporter Kyle Melinn.

21mins

10 Nov 2020

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Matt Grossmann and Virg Bernero

City Pulse on the Air on Impact 89FM

On this edition of City Pulse On the Air, editor and publisher Berl Schwartz discusses the death of Anthony Hulon with former Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero. Hulon died after being restrained by police officers in the Lansing city jail. Bernero alleges that the city misled the public about the details of Hulon's death. Schwartz also continues his discussion on the 2020 presidential election with MSU political scientist Matt Grossman. It is their last talk before election day on Nov. 3.

26mins

3 Nov 2020

Most Popular

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#197: The Making of the Modern Conservative Movement Featuring Matt Grossmann

Politics and Polls

The GOP went from full control in only three state governments in 1992 to 26 in 2018. How did the party achieve such rapid success on the state-level? Political scientist Matt Grossmann joins Julian Zelizer in this week’s episode to discuss the rise of the modern conservative movement, its grassroots origins, and its state legislature strategy. Grossman also touches upon the social issues that have driven the conservative movement in America. Grossman is a professor of political science at Michigan State University and the director of the Institute for Public Policy and Social Research. He’s also the author or co-author of four books, and his most recent book, “Red State Blues: How the Conservative Revolution Stalled in the States,” was published by Cambridge University Press in 2016.

24mins

13 Aug 2020

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City Pulse on the Air: Matt Grossmann, Paul Birdsong and Slim Gaillard

The Latest on Impact 89FM

On this edition of City Pulse On the Air, reporter Cole Tunningley gives us the story of rising Lansing civil rights activist Paul Birdsong, who has been leading daily demonstrations across Lansing and demanding the resignation of Mayor Andy Schor. Editor and publisher Berl Schwartz hosts his weekly conversation with MSU political scientist Matt Grossmann about the 2020 presidential campaign. Tune into City Pulse On the Air every Sunday, 10 a.m., on Impact 89FM.-----Join Berl Schwartz, Editor and Publisher of Lansing's City Pulse newspaper, as he and his staff talk with newsmakers from the Lansing area and around the state.

24mins

14 Jun 2020

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City Pulse on the Air: Matt Grossmann, Peter Spadafore and Earthen Vessel

The Latest on Impact 89FM

On this edition of City Pulse On the Air, Berl Schwartz interviews Lansing City Council president Peter Spadafore. The two discuss police treatment of protesters in Lansing, which included the use of tear gas. Schwartz also hosts his weekly discussion of the 2020 presidential campaign with MSU political scientist Matt Grossmann. Listen to City Pulse every Sunday at 10 a.m., on Impact 89FM.-----Join Berl Schwartz, Editor and Publisher of Lansing's City Pulse newspaper, as he and his staff talk with newsmakers from the Lansing area and around the state.

22mins

7 Jun 2020

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City Pulse on the Air: Matt Grossmann, gardening in quarantine and The Woolies

The Latest on Impact 89FM

On this edition of City Pulse On the Air, reporter Cole Tunningley talks to several Lansing residents about finding solace in gardening during lockdown. Editor and publisher Berl Schwartz hosts his weekly conversation with MSU political scientist Matt Grossmann and music writer Rich Tupica caps off the show with a track from Michigan garage legends The Woolies.Listen to City Pulse On the Air every Sunday at 10 a.m. on Impact 89FM.-----Join Berl Schwartz, Editor and Publisher of Lansing's City Pulse newspaper, as he and his staff talk with newsmakers from the Lansing area and around the state.

29mins

31 May 2020

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Matt Grossmann, "Red State Blues: How the Conservative Revolution Stalled in the States" (Cambridge UP, 2019)

New Books in Political Science

In his book Red State Blues: How the Conservative Revolution Stalled in the States (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Matt Grossmann examines, first, the watershed event of Republican takeovers of governors’ offices and state houses over the past twenty or so years. He then, through a triangular model, explores what actually happened in terms of policy outcomes and directional changes based on this political shift. What Grossmann finds, which might be a bit surprising, is that, overall, the size of state governments was not reduced under conservative leadership. He also finds that state government spending was not substantially reduced either. Grossmann argues that the policy outcomes did not necessarily match the political rhetoric on which Republicans campaigned to achieve these statewide offices.Red State Blues provides a systematic examination of policies passed across statehouses during the course of the last twenty-five years and finds that there are some gains made in regard to passage of socially conservative policies, particularly around abortion and the deregulation of guns. Grossmann also observes that criminal justice reform, decriminalization and legalization of marijuana, and same-sex marriage have all seen state-level success in terms of liberalized policy outcomes. In some cases, there has been bi-partisan support for these more progressive policies even while the state house and governors’ mansions have been dominated by more conservative Republicans. Red State Blues concludes that even with substantial electoral successes, the conservative revolution to curtail the size, cost, and scope of state-level government has not necessarily brought the anticipated outcomes. The data and the analysis bolster this conclusion, noting that it is much more difficult to cut spending and fundamentally change the way that state-level government works.Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

35mins

27 Dec 2019

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Matt Grossmann, "Red State Blues: How the Conservative Revolution Stalled in the States" (Cambridge UP, 2019)

New Books in Politics and Polemics

In his book Red State Blues: How the Conservative Revolution Stalled in the States (Cambridge University Press, 2019), Matt Grossmann examines, first, the watershed event of Republican takeovers of governors’ offices and state houses over the past twenty or so years. He then, through a triangular model, explores what actually happened in terms of policy outcomes and directional changes based on this political shift. What Grossmann finds, which might be a bit surprising, is that, overall, the size of state governments was not reduced under conservative leadership. He also finds that state government spending was not substantially reduced either. Grossmann argues that the policy outcomes did not necessarily match the political rhetoric on which Republicans campaigned to achieve these statewide offices.Red State Blues provides a systematic examination of policies passed across statehouses during the course of the last twenty-five years and finds that there are some gains made in regard to passage of socially conservative policies, particularly around abortion and the deregulation of guns. Grossmann also observes that criminal justice reform, decriminalization and legalization of marijuana, and same-sex marriage have all seen state-level success in terms of liberalized policy outcomes. In some cases, there has been bi-partisan support for these more progressive policies even while the state house and governors’ mansions have been dominated by more conservative Republicans. Red State Blues concludes that even with substantial electoral successes, the conservative revolution to curtail the size, cost, and scope of state-level government has not necessarily brought the anticipated outcomes. The data and the analysis bolster this conclusion, noting that it is much more difficult to cut spending and fundamentally change the way that state-level government works.Lilly J. Goren is professor of political science at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI. She is co-editor of the award winning book, Women and the White House: Gender, Popular Culture, and Presidential Politics (University Press of Kentucky, 2012). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/politics-and-polemics

35mins

27 Dec 2019

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