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Dan Moniz

7 Podcast Episodes

Latest 6 Nov 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Dan Moniz: Six Degrees of XSSploitation (Japanese)

Black Hat Briefings, Japan 2006 [Audio] Presentations from the security conference

Social networking sites such as MySpace have recently been the target of XSS attacks, most notably the "samy is my hero" incident in late 2005. XSS affects a wide variety of sites and back end web technologies, but there are perhaps no more interesting targets than massively popular sites with viral user acquisition growth curves, which allow for exponential XSS worm propagation, as seen in samy's hack. Combine the power of reaching a wide and ever-widening audience with browser exploits (based on the most common browsers with such a broad "normal person" user base) that can affect more than just the browser as we saw with WMF, a insertion and infection method based on transparent XSS, and payloads which can themselves round-trip the exploit code back into the same or other vulnerable sites, and you have a self-healing distributed worm propagation platform with extremely accelerated infection vectors. We investigate the possibilities using MySpace and other popular sites as case studies, along with the potential posed by both WMF and The Metasploit Project's recently-released browser fuzzing tool, Hamachi, to own a site with self-replicating XSS containing a malicious browser-exploiting payload which itself will modify the browser to auto-exploit other sites, all transparent to the user. On top of this one could layer any additional functionality, some loud, some quiet, such as DDoS bots, keyloggers, other viral payloads, and more.

51mins

4 Jun 2006

Episode artwork

David Hulton & Dan Moniz: Faster Pwning Assured: Hardware Hacks and Cracks with FPGA's

Black Hat Briefings, Las Vegas 2006 [Audio] Presentations from the security conference

"This talk will go in-depth into methods for breaking crypto faster using FPGAs. FPGA's are chips that have millions of gates that can be programmed and connected arbitrarily to perform any sort of task. Their inherent structure provides a perfect environment for running a variety of crypto algorithms and do so at speeds much faster than a conventional PC. A handful of new FPGA crypto projects will be presented and will demonstrate how many algorithms can be broken much faster than people really think, and in most cases, extremely inexpensively. Breaking WPA-PSK is possible with coWPAtty, but trying to do so onsite can be time consuming and boring. All that waiting around for things to be computed each and every time we want to check for dumb and default passwords. Well, we're impatient and like to know the password NOW! Josh Wright has recently added support for pre-computed tables to coWPAtty-but how do you create a good set of tables and not have it take 70 billion years? David Hulton has implemented the time consuming PBKDF2 step of WPA-PSK on FPGA hardware and optimized it to run at blazing speeds specifically for cracking WPA-PSK and generating tables with coWPAtty. What about those lusers that still use WEP? Have you only collected a few hundred interesting packets and don't want to wait till the universe implodes to crack your neighbor’s key? Johnycsh and David Hulton have come up with a method to offload cracking keyspaces to an FPGA and increasing the speed considerably. CheapCrack is a work in progress which follows in the footsteps of The Electronic Frontier Foundation's 1998 DES cracking machine, DeepCrack. In the intervening eight years since DeepCrack was designed, built, deployed, and won the RSA DES challenge, FPGAs have gotten smaller, faster, and cheaper. We wondered how feasible it would be to shrink the cost of building a DES cracking machine from $210,000 1998 dollars to around $10,000 2006 dollars, or less, using COTS FPGA hardware, tools, and HDL cores instead of custom fabricated ASICs. We'll show CheapCrack progress to date, and give estimates on how far from completion we are, as well as a live demo. Lanman hashes have been broken for a long time and everyone knows it's faster to do a Rainbow table lookup than go through the whole keyspace. On many PC's it takes years to go through the entire typeable range, but on a small cluster of FPGAs, you can brute force that range faster than doing a Rainbow table lookup. The code for this will be briefly presented and Chipper v2.0 will be released with many new features. David Hulton and Dan Moniz will also discuss some of the aspects of algorithms that make them suitable for acceleration on FPGAs and the reasons why they run faster in hardware."

1hr 6mins

4 Jun 2006

Similar People

Episode artwork

Dan Moniz & HD Moore: Six Degrees of XSSploitation

Black Hat Briefings, Las Vegas 2006 [Audio] Presentations from the security conference

"Social networking sites such as MySpace have recently been the target of XSS attacks, most notably the "samy is my hero" incident in late 2005. XSS affects a wide variety of sites and back end web technologies, but there are perhaps no more interesting targets than massively popular sites with viral user acquisition growth curves, which allow for exponential XSS worm propagation, as seen in samy's hack. Combine the power of reaching a wide and ever-widening audience with browser exploits (based on the most common browsers with such a broad "normal person" user base) that can affect more than just the browser as we saw with WMF, a insertion and infection method based on transparent XSS, and payloads which can themselves round-trip the exploit code back into the same or other vulnerable sites, and you have a self-healing distributed worm propagation platform with extremely accelerated infection vectors. We investigate the possibilities using MySpace and other popular sites as case studies, along with the potential posed by both WMF and The Metasploit Project's recently-released browser fuzzing tool, Hamachi, to own a site with self-replicating XSS containing a malicious browser-exploiting payload which itself will modify the browser to auto-exploit other sites, all transparent to the user. On top of this one could layer any additional functionality, some loud, some quiet, such as DDoS bots, keyloggers, other viral payloads, and more. Dan Moniz is a independent security consultant, and is also a member of The Shmoo Group, a world-recognized affiliation of information security professionals. Mr. Moniz has spoken at a number of conferences, including Defcon, ShmooCon, and The Intelligence Summit, in addition to private audiences at Fortune 50 companies and universities. In 2003 he testified in front of California State Senate in a hearing on the issues of RFID technology, privacy, and state legislation. In the past, he has held positions with a variety of high tech companies and organizations, including Alexa Internet (an Amazon.com company), Electronic Frontier Foundation, Cloudmark, OpenCola, and Viasec. HD Moore is Director of Security Research at BreakingPoint Systems where he focuses on the security testing features of the BreakingPoint product line. Prior to joining BreakingPoint, HD co-founded Digital Defense, a managed security services firm, where he developed the vulnerability assessment platform and lead the security research team. HD is the founder of the Metasploit Project and one of the core developers of the Metasploit Framework, the leading open-source exploit development platform. In his spare time, HD searches for new vulnerabilities, develops security tools, and contributes to open-source security projects."

43mins

4 Jun 2006

Episode artwork

David Hulton & Dan Moniz: Faster Pwning Assured: Hardware Hacks and Cracks with FPGA's

Black Hat Briefings, Las Vegas 2006 [Video] Presentations from the security conference

This talk will go in-depth into methods for breaking crypto faster using FPGAs. FPGA's are chips that have millions of gates that can be programmed and connected arbitrarily to perform any sort of task. Their inherent structure provides a perfect environment for running a variety of crypto algorithms and do so at speeds much faster than a conventional PC. A handful of new FPGA crypto projects will be presented and will demonstrate how many algorithms can be broken much faster than people really think, and in most cases, extremely inexpensively. Breaking WPA-PSK is possible with coWPAtty, but trying to do so onsite can be time consuming and boring. All that waiting around for things to be computed each and every time we want to check for dumb and default passwords. Well, we're impatient and like to know the password NOW! Josh Wright has recently added support for pre-computed tables to coWPAtty-but how do you create a good set of tables and not have it take 70 billion years? David Hulton has implemented the time consuming PBKDF2 step of WPA-PSK on FPGA hardware and optimized it to run at blazing speeds specifically for cracking WPA-PSK and generating tables with coWPAtty. What about those lusers that still use WEP? Have you only collected a few hundred interesting packets and don't want to wait till the universe implodes to crack your neighbor’s key? Johnycsh and David Hulton have come up with a method to offload cracking keyspaces to an FPGA and increasing the speed considerably. CheapCrack is a work in progress which follows in the footsteps of The Electronic Frontier Foundation's 1998 DES cracking machine, DeepCrack. In the intervening eight years since DeepCrack was designed, built, deployed, and won the RSA DES challenge, FPGAs have gotten smaller, faster, and cheaper. We wondered how feasible it would be to shrink the cost of building a DES cracking machine from $210,000 1998 dollars to around $10,000 2006 dollars, or less, using COTS FPGA hardware, tools, and HDL cores instead of custom fabricated ASICs. We'll show CheapCrack progress to date, and give estimates on how far from completion we are, as well as a live demo. Lanman hashes have been broken for a long time and everyone knows it's faster to do a Rainbow table lookup than go through the whole keyspace. On many PC's it takes years to go through the entire typeable range, but on a small cluster of FPGAs, you can brute force that range faster than doing a Rainbow table lookup. The code for this will be briefly presented and Chipper v2.0 will be released with many new features. David Hulton and Dan Moniz will also discuss some of the aspects of algorithms that make them suitable for acceleration on FPGAs and the reasons why they run faster in hardware."

1hr 6mins

4 Jun 2006

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Dan Moniz & HD Moore: Six Degrees of XSSploitation

Black Hat Briefings, Las Vegas 2006 [Video] Presentations from the security conference

Social networking sites such as MySpace have recently been the target of XSS attacks, most notably the "samy is my hero" incident in late 2005. XSS affects a wide variety of sites and back end web technologies, but there are perhaps no more interesting targets than massively popular sites with viral user acquisition growth curves, which allow for exponential XSS worm propagation, as seen in samy's hack. Combine the power of reaching a wide and ever-widening audience with browser exploits (based on the most common browsers with such a broad "normal person" user base) that can affect more than just the browser as we saw with WMF, a insertion and infection method based on transparent XSS, and payloads which can themselves round-trip the exploit code back into the same or other vulnerable sites, and you have a self-healing distributed worm propagation platform with extremely accelerated infection vectors. We investigate the possibilities using MySpace and other popular sites as case studies, along with the potential posed by both WMF and The Metasploit Project's recently-released browser fuzzing tool, Hamachi, to own a site with self-replicating XSS containing a malicious browser-exploiting payload which itself will modify the browser to auto-exploit other sites, all transparent to the user. On top of this one could layer any additional functionality, some loud, some quiet, such as DDoS bots, keyloggers, other viral payloads, and more. Dan Moniz is a independent security consultant, and is also a member of The Shmoo Group, a world-recognized affiliation of information security professionals. Mr. Moniz has spoken at a number of conferences, including Defcon, ShmooCon, and The Intelligence Summit, in addition to private audiences at Fortune 50 companies and universities. In 2003 he testified in front of California State Senate in a hearing on the issues of RFID technology, privacy, and state legislation. In the past, he has held positions with a variety of high tech companies and organizations, including Alexa Internet (an Amazon.com company), Electronic Frontier Foundation, Cloudmark, OpenCola, and Viasec. HD Moore is Director of Security Research at BreakingPoint Systems where he focuses on the security testing features of the BreakingPoint product line. Prior to joining BreakingPoint, HD co-founded Digital Defense, a managed security services firm, where he developed the vulnerability assessment platform and lead the security research team. HD is the founder of the Metasploit Project and one of the core developers of the Metasploit Framework, the leading open-source exploit development platform. In his spare time, HD searches for new vulnerabilities, develops security tools, and contributes to open-source security projects."

43mins

4 Jun 2006

Episode artwork

Eric Monti & Dan Moniz: Defeating Extrusion Detection

Black Hat Briefings, USA 2007 [Audio] Presentations from the security conference.

Todays headlines are rife with high profile information leakage cases affecting major corporations and government institutions. Most of the highest-profile leakage news has about been stolen laptops (VA, CPS), or large-scale external compromises of customer databases (TJX). On a less covered, but much more commonplace basis, sensitive financial data, company secrets, and customer information move in and out of networks and on and off of company systems all the time. Where it goes can be hard to pin down. How can a company prevent (let alone detect) Alice taking a snapshot of the customer database or financial projections and posting them on internet forums or even dumping them to a floppy disk? This, understandably, has a lot of people worried. In response, many organizations have begun looking for technologies to detect and prevent sensitive information from leaving their networks, servers, workstations, and even buildings. For some time a product space for ""Extrusion Detection"" products has existed. But now the space is exploding and as tends to happen, security problems abound. Some ""Extrusion Detections"" products rely on network gateway IPS/IDS approaches, whereas others work in a way more closely resembling host-based IDS/IPS. The main difference is that instead of detecting/preventing malicious information from entering a company's perimeter, they focus on keeping assets *inside*. We've been evaluating a number of products in this space and have run across a large number of vulnerabilities. They range from improper evidence handling, to inherent design issues, all the way to complete compromise of an enterprise, using the Extrusion Detection framework itself as the vehicle.

1hr 23mins

9 Jan 2006

Episode artwork

Eric Monti & Dan Moniz: Defeating Extrusion Detection

Black Hat Briefings, USA 2007 [Video] Presentations from the security conference.

Todays headlines are rife with high profile information leakage cases affecting major corporations and government institutions. Most of the highest-profile leakage news has about been stolen laptops (VA, CPS), or large-scale external compromises of customer databases (TJX). On a less covered, but much more commonplace basis, sensitive financial data, company secrets, and customer information move in and out of networks and on and off of company systems all the time. Where it goes can be hard to pin down. How can a company prevent (let alone detect) Alice taking a snapshot of the customer database or financial projections and posting them on internet forums or even dumping them to a floppy disk? This, understandably, has a lot of people worried. In response, many organizations have begun looking for technologies to detect and prevent sensitive information from leaving their networks, servers, workstations, and even buildings. For some time a product space for ""Extrusion Detection"" products has existed. But now the space is exploding and as tends to happen, security problems abound. Some ""Extrusion Detections"" products rely on network gateway IPS/IDS approaches, whereas others work in a way more closely resembling host-based IDS/IPS. The main difference is that instead of detecting/preventing malicious information from entering a company's perimeter, they focus on keeping assets *inside*. We've been evaluating a number of products in this space and have run across a large number of vulnerabilities. They range from improper evidence handling, to inherent design issues, all the way to complete compromise of an enterprise, using the Extrusion Detection framework itself as the vehicle.

1hr 23mins

9 Jan 2006