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Salman Rushdie Podcasts

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63 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Salman Rushdie. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Salman Rushdie, often where they are interviewed.

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63 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Salman Rushdie. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Salman Rushdie, often where they are interviewed.

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Haroun and the Sea of Stories by Salman Rushdie

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Ben and Nate journey to Earth's second moon of Kahani to formally apologize for poisoning the fabled Sea of Stories with their terrible writing. When they arrive they find the entire mess has been pinned on some guy named Khattam-Shud and that their adventure was actually an allegory for the importance of free speech. 

Dec 06 2020 · 1hr 6mins
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Salman Rushdie Reads “The Old Man in the Piazza”

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Salman Rushdie reads his story from the November 23, 2020, issue of the magazine. Rushdie has published twelve novels, including the Booker Prize-winning “Midnight’s Children,” “The Satanic Verses,” “The Golden House,” and, most recently, “Quichotte,” which came out last year. 

Nov 17 2020 · 37mins

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Salman Rushdie: Quichotte

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This episode of The Archive Project features an interview with Salman Rushdie from June 2020. This interview with Steph Opitz was presented through a partnership between the Wisconsin Book Festival, Literary Arts, Black Mountain Institute, and The Loft’s Wordplay, and was originally live-streamed online during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Rushdie and Opitz’s discussion focuses on Quichotte, Rushdie’s latest novel. Rushdie shares how his original inspiration for the novel was taken from Cervantes’ Don Quixote, as well as works by other classic writers, but details how his characters quickly came into their own. They also discuss current events, including the global pandemic and social uprisings in America. Throughout, Rushdie centers the power that stories and reading have to change the way a person understands the world.

You can read a transcript of this interview here, at The Believer.

“People have a very deep need for story. When children are born, the first thing they want is to feel safe, loved, have a roof over their heads, food, and so on. But very soon after that, the request comes to ‘tell me a story.’ And stories become the way in which we learn and understand the world.”

“We live in a moment in which the world can be transformed in an instant.”

“[Writing] books is a strange kind of fun. They drive you mad, and they make you constantly aware of your own inadequacies. But this one was enjoyable because I really wanted it to be funny.”

About Quichotte: Inspired by the Cervantes classic, Sam DuChamp, mediocre writer of spy thrillers, creates Quichotte, a courtly, addled salesman obsessed with television who falls in impossible love with a TV star. Together with his (imaginary) son Sancho, Quichotte sets off on a picaresque quest across America to prove worthy of her hand, gallantly braving the tragicomic perils of an age where “Anything-Can-Happen.” Meanwhile, his creator, in a midlife crisis, has equally urgent challenges of his own. Just as Cervantes wrote Don Quixote to satirize the culture of his time, Rushdie takes the reader on a wild ride through a country on the verge of moral and spiritual collapse. And with the kind of storytelling magic that is the hallmark of Rushdie’s work, the fully realized lives of DuChamp and Quichotte intertwine in a profoundly human quest for love and a wickedly entertaining portrait of an age in which fact is so often indiscernible from fiction.

Salman Rushdie is the author of thirteen previous novels—GrimusMidnight’s Children (for which he won the Booker Prize and the Best of the Booker), ShameThe Satanic VersesHaroun and the Sea of StoriesThe Moor’s Last SighThe Ground Beneath Her FeetFuryShalimar the ClownThe Enchantress of FlorenceLuka and the Fire of LifeTwo Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights, and The Golden House—and one collection of short stories: East, West. He has also published four works of nonfiction—Joseph AntonThe Jaguar SmileImaginary Homelands, and Step Across This Line—and coedited two anthologies, Mirrorwork and Best American Short Stories 2008. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and a Distinguished Writer in Residence at New York University. A former president of PEN American Center, Rushdie was knighted in 2007 for services to literature.

The post Salman Rushdie: Quichotte appeared first on Literary Arts.

Jul 22 2020 · 54mins
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Salman Rushdie

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Ian McMillan talks to Salman Rushdie about writing ‘cancel culture’ into his latest novel ‘Quichotte’, putting the realism into magic realism, the craft of an opening sentence, the appeal of Latin hymns, the genius of PG Wodehouse – and the resonance throughout his work of the classic film ‘The Wizard of Oz’.

To close the Verb season, Dr Jason Allen- Paisant reads his poem 'A Sound From The Throat of God', written after the killing of George Floyd. Dr Jason Allen- Paisant is Lecturer in Caribbean Poetry and Decolonial Thought at the University of Leeds.

Salman Rushdie
Salman Rushdie’s latest novel is ‘Quichotte’ – a story with echoes and plot rhymes, where the main protagonist is in love with a celebrity called Salma R, and goes on a road trip with an imaginary son. It’s a story where people are capable of turning into rhinoceroses, communicate in chess moves, and which also interrogates ‘cancel culture’.

Salman Rushdie is the author of thirteen novels including 'Midnight’s Children', for which he won the Man Booker Prize and Booker of Bookers Prize, and one collection of short stories. He has also published four works of non-fiction, including the internationally acclaimed bestseller, Joseph Anton, and co-edited two anthologies. His children’s fiction has also been much praised. Rushdie was knighted in 2007 for services to literature. His books have been translated into over forty languages.
Jul 17 2020 · 52mins
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How Salman Rushdie changed everything

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ARTS & SOCIETY FORUM: Kate Abley’s first novel, Changing the Subject, is an entertaining narrative about ordinary people in an extraordinary situation. She says ‘You don’t have to have read any Salman Rushdie to engage with this talk: I will make it my job to inspire you to try him. Under the feeble cover of having written a novel myself, I would like to make the experimental assertion that it is possible to describe novels in English as Pre-Rushdie and Post-Rushdie. Of course, there were rumblings of change before 1981 and the publication of Midnight’s Children. But it was that book which delivered the fatal blow to literarty-farties grumbling since the 1930s that the “The novel is dead”.’ Kate Abley and Wendy Earle discuss.

May 26 2020 · 1hr 4mins
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The Book Club: Salman Rushdie on the Age of Anything-Can-Happen

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‘Things that would have seemed utterly improbable now happen on a daily basis’, Sir Salman Rushdie said to Sam when they spoke in an interview for the Spectator's 10,000th edition. Sam met Salman in New York a few weeks ago, before coronavirus struck down the city. This episode is a recording of that interview, where they discuss everything from his latest book Quichotte, to his relationship with his father, who we learn made up the surname 'Rushdie', and how he feels about The Satanic Verses now. Sam's full interview is out in this Thursday's issue.

The Book Club is a series of literary interviews and discussions on the latest releases in the world of publishing, from poetry through to physics. Presented by Sam Leith, The Spectator's Literary Editor. Hear past episodes here.
Apr 22 2020 · 1hr
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Salman Rushdie: Quichotte

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‘Things that would have seemed utterly improbable now happen on a daily basis’, Sir Salman Rushdie said to Sam when they spoke in an interview for the Spectator's 10,000th edition. Sam met Salman in New York a few weeks ago, before coronavirus struck down the city. This episode is a recording of that interview, where they discuss everything from his latest book Quichotte, to his relationship with his father, who we learn made up the surname 'Rushdie', and how he feels about The Satanic Verses now. Sam's full interview is out in this Thursday's issue.

Presented by Sam Leith.
Apr 22 2020 · 1hr
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E130 What's Missing in Salman Rushdie's Arabian Nights

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What's Missing in Salman Rushdie's Arabian Nights

In this episode we talk about Salman Rushdie's 2015 book, Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights. We talk about Rushdie's false binary choice between heteronomy and autonomy and advance an alternative that he doesn't seem to have considered.

We'd love to hear what you think of this episode!

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Mar 09 2020 · 32mins
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Novelists Tishani Doshi and Salman Rushdie on Fiction, Poetry, and India

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The two novelists discuss Doshi's new book "Small Days and Nights."
Feb 27 2020 · 49mins
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Salman Rushdie | Quichotte

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In conversation with novelist and musician Wesley Stace

''One of the major literary voices of our time'' (San Francisco Chronicle), Salman Rushdie is the author of more than a dozen novels, including The Satanic Verses, The Golden House, and Midnight's Children, winner of the ''Booker of Bookers'' Prize in 1993. His other works include a short story collection, East, West, and four works of nonfiction, including the memoir Joseph Anton, which chronicles his time in hiding during the fatwa against him. In his latest novel, Rushdie spins the humorous tale of a modern-day Don Quixote in midlife crisis tilting at the windmills of America's moral and spiritual turpitude.
(recorded 12/10/2019)
Dec 11 2019 · 1hr 8mins
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