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Janine Yorimoto Boldt

3 Podcast Episodes

Latest 15 Jan 2022 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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299 Janine Yorimoto Boldt, Colonial Virginia Portraits

Ben Franklin's World

What can a portrait reveal about the history of colonial British America? Portraits were both deeply personal and yet collaborative artifacts left behind by people of the past. When historians look at multiple portraits created around the same time and place, their similarities can reveal important social connections, trade relationships, or cultural beliefs about race and gender in early American history.  Janine Yorimoto Boldt, Associate Curator of American Art at the Chazen Museum of Art and the researcher behind the digital project Colonial Virginia Portraits, leads us on an exploration of portraiture and what it can reveal about the early American past.  Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/299 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 024: Kimberly Alexander, 18th-Century Fashion & Material Culture Episode 084: Zara Anishanslin, How Historians Read Historical Sources Episode 106: Jane Kamensky, The World of John Singleton Copley Episode 136: Jennifer Van Horn, Material Culture and the Making of America Episode 292: Glenn Adamson, Craft in Early America  Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

41mins

6 Apr 2021

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155. Painting Portraits of Colonial Virginia with Janine Yorimoto Boldt

Conversations at the Washington Library

In 1757, Martha Dandridge Custis paid the artist John Wollaston the handsome sum of 56 pistoles for portraits of her, her husband Daniel Parke Custis, and their children, John and Martha. A pistole was a Spanish gold coin commonly used in the colony at the time. The future Mrs. Martha Washington was among the hundreds of Virginians who had their portraits painted over the course of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. They used portraiture to depict their wealth and status among the Virginia aristocracy, communicate ideas about gender, and cement their identities as cultured members of the British Empire. Many of these portraits survive in museums, historical societies, archives, and even private homes. Many of them have been lost to the ravages of time, and mentioned only in passing in letters, diaries, or other pieces of evidence. Fortunately, you can now see many of these portraits in one place. On today’s episode, Dr. Janine Yorimoto Boldt joins me to discuss her new digital project, Colonial Virginia Portraits. Inspired by her dissertation on early American visual culture, and built in collaboration with the Omohundro Institute, Colonial Virginia Portraits is a fascinating way to see our early American past. About Our Guest: Janine Yorimoto Boldt is the 2018-2020 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow at the American Philosophical Society. She is lead curator for the 2020 exhibition, Dr. Franklin, Citizen Scientist, and was co-curator of Mapping a Nation: Shaping the Early American Republic. Janine received her PhD in American Studies from William & Mary in 2018. Her current book project investigates the political function and development of portraiture in colonial Virginia. About Our Host: Jim Ambuske, Ph.D. leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. A historian of the American Revolution, Scotland, and the British Atlantic World, Ambuske graduated from the University of Virginia in 2016. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA Law, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  He is currently at work on a book about emigration from Scotland in the era of the American Revolution as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mountvernon/message

41mins

23 Apr 2020

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129. Mapping a Nation with Erin Holmes and Janine Yorimoto Boldt

Conversations at the Washington Library

Maps do more than visualize landscapes, identify political borders, or chart rivers and oceans. They show us the many and varied ways that we make sense of the world around us. How then, did Early Americans make sense of their world through maps?  Mapping a Nation: Shaping the Early American Republic offers one answer. It is an exhibit currently on display at the American Philosophical Society (APS) in Philadelphia. Using maps, the tools to make them, and other objects, the exhibition shows "how maps were used to create and extend the physical, political, and ideological boundaries of the new nation while creating and reinforcing structural inequalities in the Early Republic." On this episode, lead curator Dr. Erin Holmes and co-curator Dr. Janine Yorimoto Boldt sit down with Jim Ambuske to discuss how they brought Mapping a Nation to life. You'll also get a sneak peak at Dr. Boldt's next exhibition, Dr. Franklin, Citizen Scientist, which will open at APS in Spring 2020. About Our Guests: Erin Holmes is the Kinder Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Missouri. She is a former Washington Library Fellow. She is also a former Andrew W. Mellon Post-Doctoral Curatorial Fellow at the American Philosophical Society where was lead curator for Mapping a Nation: Shaping the Early American Republic. She received her Ph.D. in History from the University of South Carolina in 2017 and B.A. in History from the College of William and Mary. Her research compares the evolution of plantation slavery and colonial identity through the built environment in Virginia, South Carolina, and Barbados during the long 18th century. Janine Yorimoto Boldt is the 2018-2020 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow at the American Philosophical Society. She is lead curator for the 2020 exhibition, Dr. Franklin, Citizen Scientist, and was co-curator of Mapping a Nation: Shaping the Early American Republic. Janine received her PhD in American Studies from William & Mary in 2018. Her current book project investigates the political function and development of portraiture in colonial Virginia. About Our Host: Jim Ambuske, Ph.D. leads the Center for Digital History at the Washington Library. A historian of the American Revolution, Scotland, and the British Atlantic World, Ambuske graduated from the University of Virginia in 2016. He is a former Farmer Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia Law Library. At UVA Law, Ambuske co-directed the 1828 Catalogue Project and the Scottish Court of Session Project.  He is currently at work on a book about emigration from Scotland in the era of the American Revolution as well as a chapter on Scottish loyalism during the American Revolution for a volume to be published by the University of Edinburgh Press.--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mountvernon/message

37mins

24 Oct 2019