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Susan Neiman

17 Podcast Episodes

Latest 16 Oct 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Susan Neiman: What America Can Learn From Germany About Facing Its Past

Dastardly Cleverness in the Service of Good

It may be hard for many Americans to imagine, but there are striking parallels between post-Civil-War America and post-World-War-2 Germany. Our guest this time is an expert on those parallels, and wrote a deeply-researched, insightful, and important book about them. Philosopher Susan Neiman is the author of Learning From the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil. She describes how Germans finally began what a process of vergangenheitsaufarbeitung, or “working off the past.” It has helped Germany both to make atonement, and to build a better society. As America begins facing its own forgotten, buried, or rewritten past, we can learn a lot from this book and its author.

57mins

8 Jun 2021

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Philosophin Susan Neiman - "Ich bin der Typus kosmopolitische, jüdische Intellektuelle"

Im Gespräch - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Mit 14 wähnte Susan Neiman die Revolution vor der Tür, schmiss die Schule und las die französischen Existenzialisten. Später machte die gebürtige US-Amerikanerin trotzdem an der Uni Karriere. Einer engagierten Philosophie bleibt sie bis heute treu. Moderation: Susanne Führer www.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, Im Gespräch Hören bis: 19.01.2038 04:14 Direkter Link zur Audiodatei

34mins

25 May 2021

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S3E13 | "Learning from the Germans" - a virtual talk with Dr. Susan Neiman

Hier & There. The podcast of the Germanic-American Institute (GAI Podcast)

Today’s episode is the podcast version of a virtual talk with Dr. Susan Neiman; “Learning from the Germans”. Susan Neiman directs Berlin’s Einstein Forum, a public think tank for the state of Brandenburg. She has lived in Berlin for most of her adult life but was born and raised in the southern United States. For this book, she spent three years interviewing people in both Germany and the United States. In her book, she asks what we can learn from the Germans about confronting past evils, the concept of Vergangenheitsaufarbeitung, "working off the past", and how communities can come together to remember and move forward. Her other works include Slow Fire: Jewish Notes from Berlin, The Unity of Reason: Rereading Kant, Evil in Modern Thought, Moral Clarity: A Guide for Grownup Idealists, and Why Grow Up? Subversive Thoughts for an Infantile Age. ### Since 1957 The Germanic American Institute has been building cultural bridges between the American Midwest and German-speaking European countries. We cordially invite you on the inside, to join us as we share insights into German grammar, the German cultural experience, we’ll look at current topics, and we’ll let you know about all the events that we are involved in, and you can participate in. If you'd like us to answer any questions you may have about our content, history, grammar, etc. please email us at podcast@gaimn.org and we'll answer your question in the next episode. ###

1hr 1min

25 Apr 2021

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Im Saarbrücker Gespräch: Susan Neiman

Diskurs

"Das Saarbrücker Gespräch" mit Prof. Dr. Susan Neiman, US-amerikanische Philosophin und Direktorin des Einstein Forums Potsdam

16 Mar 2021

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Susan Neiman & Daryle Lamont Jenkins: Learning from the Past to Chart the Future

Refuse Fascism

It's the 50th episode!  We started the podcast this past summer; the week millions began to pour into the streets rebelling against white supremacy and demanding justice for George Floyd. When we began a fascist regime was tightening its grip on society; we called the podcast "Inside With #OutNow" as the movement to get these fascists out became all the more urgent.  Since then, we've covered Trump's refusal to wear a mask as a signal to fascism and other forms of fascist propaganda, the white supremacy, xenophobia and misogyny that is the core of this fascism, Trump’s death cult, the Christian Fascist movement and its embrace of Trump, American exceptionalism and American mythology; faith, resistance and complicity under fascism. We've shared voices from the frontlines: from Portland and LA to North Carolina and the suburbs of Chicago, and overall the need to stop fascism and organizing methods to mobilize all who can be united against it. Throughout all of this we have mobilized people to act in the name of humanity.  Thanks to all the amazing guests of the show as well as all of YOU listening, sharing and commenting. Donate this week and help us reach more people and do more... All donors who give $50 for this milestone will receive a beautiful Humanity enamel pin as a thank you (if you provide your address).  This week, Sam Goldman interviews Susan Neiman, director of the Einstein Forum in Germany and author of Learning from the Germans: Confronting Race and the Memory of Evil and Daryle Lamont Jenkins, Executive Director of One People's Project. Follow Daryle on Twitter @DLamontJenkins. Send your comments to samanthagoldman@refusefascism.org or @SamBGoldman. Connect with the movement at RefuseFascism.org and support: Venmo: @Refuse-Fascism      Cashapp: @RefuseFascism       paypal.me/refusefascism  donate.refusefascism.org Music for this episode: Penny the Snitch by Ikebe Shakedown.--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/refuse-fascism/message

1hr 7mins

14 Mar 2021

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Learning from the Germans: SUSAN NEIMAN on how Germany confronted its past

The Bunker

What can you do when your society is responsible for racist atrocities? What should you do? One country trying to atone for their past is Germany. Susan Neiman, moral philosopher and author of ‘Learning from the Germans’, told Ros Taylor about what the U.S. can learn from the way Germany deals with its past, and why the English have been even slower than America in facing up to their national crimes.  “The Germans saw themselves as the worst victims of the war” “No two pieces of history are exactly alike” “Every nation would like to see its people as heroes” Presented by Ros Taylor. Produced by Andrew Harrison. Assistant producer Jacob Archbold. Music by Kenny Dickinson. Audio production by Alex Rees. THE BUNKER is a Podmasters Production See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

29mins

14 Sep 2020

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#LockdownDebates: Morality during a pandemic, with Susan Neiman and Frank Furedi

Academy of Ideas

LOCKDOWN DEBATE: The worldwide response to the pandemic has challenged many long-cherished values. Democracy was put on hold, with elections postponed and parliaments in recess. Freedoms were curtailed, with extensive powers granted to police forces. Traditional markers of compassion, like funerals, were cancelled. And many say that essential workers, from nurses to shop-assistants, were put in harm’s way. Amidst such widespread moral challenges, how are we to decide what’s right? Whilst a rich tradition of philosophy reflects on how to be moral, can it be useful in such ‘unprecedented’ times? Is there anything we can learn from history? When we are urged to ‘follow the science’ and obey government guidance, is there any room for individual judgement and moral autonomy? Susan Neiman and Frank Furedi discuss.

1hr 54mins

4 Jun 2020

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We Can Be Heroes (with Susan Neiman)

With Friends Like These

In Germany, studying the Holocaust — and the part everyday Germans played in it — is part of the school curriculum. There are memorials to the Jewish lives lost throughout the country, but they do not memorialize Nazis who died. Contrast this with the American South. This week Susan Neiman, author of the book, Learning From the Germans, joins Ana Marie Cox (@anamariecox) to explain what we can learn from the Germans about regret and repentance.They talk about the inspiration for writing the book, how a museum exhibit helped change German opinion, and why language matters when we talk about monuments on an international scale. These are not normal times and we all have the ability to make change. What should our next steps be?Want to help fight voter suppression? Click here to learn about Fair Fight.Find out more about Susan Neiman’s book here.Thanks to our sponsors:Ritual left out mystery additives, synthetic fillers, and shady extras that can be found in some traditional multivitamins. Their delayed-release no-nausea designed capsule is made to be gentle on an empty stomach—and the mint-essenced tab in every bottle makes taking your vitamins a minty-fresh experience. Go to ritual.com/FRIENDS to get 10% off your first three months.Postage rates have gone up AGAIN. Thankfully, Stamps.com eases the pain with big discounts off Post Office retail rates. Stamps.com is a no-brainer – saving you TIME and MONEY. It’s no wonder over 700,000 small businesses already use Stamps.com. Get a 4-week trial PLUS free postage AND a digital scale without any long-term commitment when you go to Stamps.com, click on the Microphone at the TOP of the homepage and type in FRIENDS. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

1hr 3mins

7 Feb 2020

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Susan Neiman, “Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil” (FSG, 2019)

New Books in Genocide Studies

When Tennessee’s Governor recently ordered a holiday to celebrate the memory of confederate general Nathan Bedford Forest, a convicted war criminal who helped found the Ku Klax Klan, the New York Times columnist Paul Krugman commented: “The world would be horrified if Germany announced plans to start celebrating Erich von Manstein Day.” Krugman’s point was to emphasize that to celebrate a commander of the German Army from the Nazi period does not behoove a modern democratic nation. But his analogy of celebrating the founder of the Klan in today’s America and a Nazi in today’s Germany is more than another dispute between liberals and conservative Americans. Krugman invokes Germany’s “overcoming” or “coming to terms with” its past of racial violence, atrocity and genocide as a possible guide for American attitudes toward its racialized past.But how did Germany deal with the Nazi past? How did post-Germany move from the legacy of fascism to today’s democratic political culture? And how can America learn from a country that had committed the crime of the Holocaust which has served as a universal moral yardstick for nearly half a century? I spoke with philosopher Susan Neiman, author of Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2019), about these questions, and whether contemporary America can learn anything from post-war Germany’s ways of dealing with its past crimes.Uli Baer is a professor at New York University. He is also the host of the excellent podcast "Think About It" Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/genocide-studies

1hr 25mins

6 Nov 2019

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Susan Neiman, “Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil” (FSG, 2019)

New Books in Politics and Polemics

When Tennessee’s Governor recently ordered a holiday to celebrate the memory of confederate general Nathan Bedford Forest, a convicted war criminal who helped found the Ku Klax Klan, the New York Times columnist Paul Krugman commented: “The world would be horrified if Germany announced plans to start celebrating Erich von Manstein Day.” Krugman’s point was to emphasize that to celebrate a commander of the German Army from the Nazi period does not behoove a modern democratic nation. But his analogy of celebrating the founder of the Klan in today’s America and a Nazi in today’s Germany is more than another dispute between liberals and conservative Americans. Krugman invokes Germany’s “overcoming” or “coming to terms with” its past of racial violence, atrocity and genocide as a possible guide for American attitudes toward its racialized past.But how did Germany deal with the Nazi past? How did post-Germany move from the legacy of fascism to today’s democratic political culture? And how can America learn from a country that had committed the crime of the Holocaust which has served as a universal moral yardstick for nearly half a century? I spoke with philosopher Susan Neiman, author of Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2019), about these questions, and whether contemporary America can learn anything from post-war Germany’s ways of dealing with its past crimes.Uli Baer is a professor at New York University. He is also the host of the excellent podcast "Think About It" Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/politics-and-polemics

1hr 25mins

6 Nov 2019

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