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Michael Beinhorn

26 Podcast Episodes

Latest 18 Sep 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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GSP #40: Special Guest Justin Wertz - Book Club - Unlocking Creativity by Michael Beinhorn - Chapter 1

The Getcha Some Productions Podcast

Getcha Some Productions Podcast Episode 40Buy the Book here: Unlocking Creativity by Michael Beinhorn https://amzn.to/3B9f458To support the podcast, shop on Reverb here: https://reverb.grsm.io/GetchaSomePlease subscribe on your favorite podcast app: http://www.getchasomeproductions.com/podcastPlease like and subscribe:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_nc0nleQ5Yk_eKuNpkDFvQA podcast covering all things related to music production: from the first note to the last fan and everything in between.  We create music and inspire others to do the same.  Every episode is a live business meeting between me and Dan (me and Keith) as we build this media empire right before your very eyes/ears.In this episode we discuss:Getcha Some Productions Book ClubBuy the Book here: Unlocking Creativity by Michael Beinhorn https://amzn.to/3B9f458Per our usual process, we read some selected excerpts and discuss.This is episode 40 so we are, as a podcast, entering our midlife crisis now.Justin is a real go-getter and he’s read far ahead in the book. He’s already up to chapter 5 and we’re only discussed in chapter 1 on this episode.Justin talks a little bit about his impression of the book and in doing so he also mentions that he went to college for Music. He was a studio composition major.  Justin is describing the fact that when he was in school he selected a lot of classes from a lot of different disciplines within music composition, studio and record production. When he was sitting down with his college advisor, his advisor looked at his course-load and said that he thought he would become a music producer because of the courses that he selected. I think the point was that, even though they were all within music composition/production/engineering obviously They were across a wide range of disciplines within music production.  Justin was and is into song writing and creative engineering.We reminisce a bit about the demo we made in high school for our band Oliver‘s musical genius and about how one of the engineers that was on the session had a lot of creative ideas about how to make the songs come alive by suggesting different sounds, different auxiliary instruments  and making sure we had good performances.  And, in a sense, producing the record (more or less) for us. And we knew Very little back then so I think we were going to just waltz in and play our parts and that’s it.One of the things that comes up as we address the first excerpt is the fact that producers are required to wear many hats and have many skills in the studio. Everything from managing the talent to the more technical aspects of engineering and elements of composition and arrangement. It’s a tough job. It’s probably something that you would arrive at at the end of a career in music. This is a job for the wise elders of music.Justin highlights the next excerpt regarding a producers role and influence on the artist.  He compares the experience of working with a producer almost like a Boot Camp for the artist. He describes the fact that Beinhorn says that the artist should come away from the experience having grown (perhaps substantially) from it. So Beinhorn is always trying to elevate the role of a producer beyond that of just producing the music and the end result of a record but rather having more of a mentor and perhaps even spiritual role (beyond just making sure the end product is good).  Justin says, and perhaps rightfully so, that the producer/artist relationship is almost of the master and the apprentice. It sort of sounds like that from this chapter of the book.We get to the meat of the chapter which describes his six-stage process of working with an artist to get ready to produce the record (prior to actually going into the recording studio). Six steps are:Introduction and interviewA flyover of the artists workCreative visualizationPreliminary pre-productionPre-productionThe next Vista awaitsWe discuss each stage and our interpretation (and our feedback) on each one. It’s important to note upfront that the sixth stage is very confusing. Justin refers to it as the marinating stage which I think is probably very good characterization but I also think it’s a little more complicated than that because he adds a few other details to it in the book which I think we’ll get to eventually.Some of these are self-explanatory and some of them or not. I think number two seems self-explanatory on the face of it in that you have to familiarize yourself with the artist work. However, Justin and I discuss and Justin points out, that it’s really incumbent upon the producer to do research and investigation into the artist’s work and their true artistry. What this entails is not just taking from them their press kit or a demo but doing independent research and digging into the things that they haven’t shared that may be of use.We discuss Beinhorn’s characterization of artists as creative entities and we discuss the differences between bands like the Grateful Dead and Phish and individual artists like Bob Dylan.Oh these are highly unscripted and unplanned conversations which are turning out to be very valuable. When allowed to discuss these ideas in a free-form way, we are uncovering many important concepts that we’re not apparent when reading the book.  Yay book club!The most interesting stage to me was preliminary preproduction. It’s like, before you can do production, you have to do pre-production. But, before you can do pre-production, you have to do preliminary pre-production.I make a comment about liking the process of writing the tunes, working on them in the studio but letting them become crystallized live. Justin rightfully points out the fact that there’s a potential downfall there because you can end up crystallizing bad habits which, in the heat of the moment live, you don’t realize (cementing bad habits). Very true.  Justin goes on to say that you could use this process after the pre-production phase when the arrangements have already been very carefully and thoughtfully composed.  To further the point, it is valuable to add a stress element in the performance because when you get to the studio there is a stress element there. You have to be able to perform under stress.Justin was quite “hot-to-trot” for a long time. He and I were both in a band called Oliver’s Musical Genius (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6iRajenI2SUKsiRtxMzlHQ). Then he was in a phenomenal band called Trademark. After that he was in Cheryl’s Magnetic Aura (http://www.pukekos.org/2009/04/sheryls-magnetic-aura.html) and then after that he was in Maneguar (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meneguar). All fantastic bands and they got better over time so the worst of them was probably Oliver’s Musical Genius.Ever since his last band, Justin hasn’t put a lot of music out. The last thing he really put out there was Blank Baby (https://blankbaby.bandcamp.com). Which we will link to. But it’s actually a lot of instrumental type stuff and not really the full songwriting experience that he’s really getting into right now.#MusicProduction#DIYMusician#MusicRecording#MusicTechnique#TheArtistsLife#Creativity#Creative Music#Music#10,000Hours#TheHandshake#GetchaSomeGuitar#OliversMusicalGenius#ErosPragma#Mitochondriac

54mins

5 Sep 2021

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GSP #39: Book Club - Unlocking Creativity by Michael Beinhorn - Chapter 1

The Getcha Some Productions Podcast

Getcha Some Productions Podcast Episode 39Buy the Book here: Unlocking Creativity by Michael Beinhorn https://amzn.to/3B9f458To support the podcast, shop on Reverb here: https://reverb.grsm.io/GetchaSomePlease subscribe on your favorite podcast app: http://www.getchasomeproductions.com/podcastPlease like and subscribe:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_nc0nleQ5Yk_eKuNpkDFvQA podcast covering all things related to music production: from the first note to the last fan and everything in between.  We create music and inspire others to do the same.  Every episode is a live business meeting between me and Dan (me and Keith) as we build this media empire right before your very eyes/ears.In this episode we discuss:Getcha Some Productions Book ClubBuy the Book here: Unlocking Creativity by Michael Beinhorn https://amzn.to/3B9f458Per our usual process, we read some excerpts and discuss.The first excerpt we discuss deals with the fact that record producers, in an ideal sense, are really responsible for a very long list and wide range of skills and services throughout the process of music production.  It seems a bit improbable and daunting to consider all the different things a record producer is supposed to be an expert in according to this book.Dan highlights the fact that in all of our experiences producing records, we didn’t have anything close to what Michael Beinhorn suggests a producer would be. We really didn’t have anyone in that role providing any of those services or any of that oversight.Based on this book, and the role a producer is supposed to have. Or take, The Handshake record wasn’t even a fully produced record. It was really just a demo in a sense. Links below.The Handshake Self Titled AlbumStreaming LinksFull Album:YouTube https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5n4xoKs6aAuBifgXaFzCscMvO72GvAZASpotify https://open.spotify.com/artist/4SJ8fGm8x5ajeYxwwPDLwG?si=-pe2PSpiTuyo-cf4YK_a_AApple Music https://music.apple.com/us/album/the-handshake/552979025Creating a safe space is the most important thing.What’s really fun about this episode is Dan’s facial expressions while I spout nonsense.Praise for Joe Hertenstein.  The old drummer of the Handshake and a consummate professional.One of the themes that keeps popping up is the dichotomy of roles of a producer between taking an active artistic role and shaping the final product versus stepping out of the way and simply facilitating and enabling the artists vision.I talk a little bit about the album Original Pirate Material by The Streets. And how at first I thought it was terrible but after I got used to it I started to believe it was one of the most genius albums ever made. How could you possibly be a producer and have to make an artistic choice and trust your artistic decision when you can potentially be so wrong.Commitment to the unknown?  Step into the void.Dan was right to point out that, outside of the actual content of the book, the style of writing is very engaging. Within a particular chapter Beinhorn changes styles frequently to keep the reader’s interest up.  It’s pretty easy reading.What do you think of the scarf?  You need a scarf like this if you live in LA because it keeps the dust out of your shirt.The big question is: is this book actually useful?Dan’s answer: this book, even after reading just the first few chapters, has already changed his concept about how to approach a recording. Asking who the producer will be is an essential part of the process for him now. So yes, this is very useful.#MusicProduction#DIYMusician#MusicRecording#MusicTechnique#TheArtistsLife#Creativity#Creative Music#Music#10,000Hours#TheHandshake#GetchaSomeGuitar#OliversMusicalGenius#ErosPragma#Mitochondriac

30mins

29 Aug 2021

Similar People

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GSP #38: Special Guest Justin Wertz – Book Club - Unlocking Creativity by Michael Beinhorn

The Getcha Some Productions Podcast

Getcha Some Productions Podcast Episode 38Buy the Book here: Unlocking Creativity by Michael Beinhorn https://amzn.to/3B9f458To support the podcast, shop on Reverb here: https://reverb.grsm.io/GetchaSomePlease like and subscribe:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_nc0nleQ5Yk_eKuNpkDFvQA podcast covering all things related to music production: from the first note to the last fan and everything in between.  We create music and inspire others to do the same.  Every episode is a live business meeting between me and Dan (me and Keith) as we build this media empire right before your very eyes/ears.In this episode we discuss:Getcha Some Productions Book ClubBuy the Book here: Unlocking Creativity by Michael Beinhorn https://amzn.to/3B9f458My special guest today is Justin Wertz. Apparently we changed each others lives.Justin was quite “hot-to-trot” for a long time. He and I were both in a band called Oliver’s Musical Genius (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6iRajenI2SUKsiRtxMzlHQ). Then he was in a phenomenal band called Trademark. After that he was in Cheryl’s Magnetic Aura (http://www.pukekos.org/2009/04/sheryls-magnetic-aura.html) and then after that he was in Maneguar (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meneguar). All fantastic bands and they got better over time so the worst of them was probably Oliver’s Musical Genius.The quarantine, for Justin, gave him just enough time to breathe and slow down in his life to start writing music. Again. To start writing music again. Even though he hasn’t released a lot of this material, it’s really quite good. He and I have been sharing songs back-and-forth and Justin’s songwriting has really improved substantially. I’m actually envious of this point because he’s become such a great songwriter.Ever since his last band, Justin hasn’t put a lot of music out. The last thing he really put out there was Blank Baby (https://blankbaby.bandcamp.com). Which we will link to. But it’s actually a lot of instrumental type stuff and not really the full songwriting experience that he’s really getting into right now.We start to discuss the book and what we hope to get out of it. I hope that reading it together causes us to become more mindful about how we work together and makes us more productive and better at working with each other so that we can create more music together.Justin starts talking about how we already have been collaborating and sharing ideas back-and-forth and we do have our own method. However this guy Michael Beinhorn has a more expansive method perhaps than we have. His method is very systematic and scientific (or so it seems).  Justin says we should put some of his stuff into practice right away. I agree with that.Episode 36 was the first episode where we reviewed this particular book. Dan and I went over the intro of the book and went over some quotes we thought were important to discuss.So, part of our process actually the whole process, is that we pick out quotes that we think are interesting and we read them on the air and then we discuss them. So that’s what we start doing now.We discuss the role of a producer and the different roles that a producer can take and the different skill sets that are required.  Justin highlights the role of record producer as being like the Art Director of the process. Or the curator.The thing that keeps coming up as we read through the book is that there is a competing agenda between the role of the producer as a transparent vehicle or vector for the artists expression and the producers own artistic agenda. It’s almost like those two things are competing forces and as a producer you want to get out of the way and let the artist blossom into their fullest potential but you also want to input some energy into the system so that they are Fueled to grow as artists or to realize their fullest potential. But, by putting any energy into the system to spur the artist on or to support the artist and lift them up to their highest or even higher potential you are taking some directive action. You are influencing the final product by choosing where to put that energy. So you have to be an artist as a producer to a certain extent because ultimately you will influence the final product.Justin brings up the book the art of Zen mixing which is perhaps a book we should read next.This book gets my mind going big-time. Is the frame part of the art?There’s more to songwriting than just songwriting.We always have to be striving for something that’s greater than…. We have to have passion and we have to make true art. Whatever the hell that is.Don’t miss the point. You have to go deeper than that.Record production is spiritual and nurturing and mentoring.Justin started talking about the Rick Rubin and Johnny Cash relationship and how poignant and powerful that all was.I’m always looking to unlock some creativity.The producers chief skill is wisdom.We have to break down walls.  But these walls don’t go down with force. When space opens up they become integrated with space. They just dissolve.  Newtonian fluid.  Safe space.  Go with the flow. Amplify yourself. Work with your strengths.  The lonely travelers. Distant lights. Elements. A wave. A force. An energy. Oh. A particle.  A beautiful burden. A generator. Vector. Flashlight.  Calling.  ChromaticOne day I’d like to make a list of every music related movie. Don’t forget this.I’m glad we went long and we opened it up to some free forum discussion because Justin highlighted one of the most important aspects of the book and the process of record producing. It’s that of the safe space. A record producer must, above almost everything else, cultivate a safe space.Justin says that Nirvana and Pearl Jam and sugar ray were shoved down his throat. I find it somewhat hilarious that he puts Nirvana and Pearl Jam in the same category as Sugar Ray. That is highly controversial.Justin says that Pavement and/or Superchunk were way more raw and honest and better and his opinion.Then, Justin he says some more really powerful and poignant stuff. He gives us a slight preview into the future chapters of the book by talking about what an artist is. I guess he says that one of the essential elements of artistry is that it’s a calling. It’s just something you have to do. Justin says that his life would be so much easier if he didn’t have to pick up the guitar. So your artistry is a beautiful burden in a way.  What he closes with is the idea that whatever comes out is worth putting out there.Justin talks about the album Superunknown by Soundgarden and how that one was an elevated piece of expression in his opinion from the other especially earlier records. So he can he’s making the inference that there was some kind of elevated artistry that was imposed by the production of Michael Beinhorn. Then he goes on to talk about how he produced of Violent Femmes record and but it was a compilation and that’s how Justin came to the conclusion that the description of the record producer as art Director or curator is also appropriate.#MusicProduction#DIYMusician#MusicRecording#MusicTechnique#TheArtistsLife#Creativity#Creative Music#Music#10,000Hours#TheHandshake#GetchaSomeGuitar#OliversMusicalGenius#ErosPragma#Mitochondriac

1hr 5mins

22 Aug 2021

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GSP #36: Unlocking Creativity by Michael Beinhorn - We discuss the Introduction to the book

The Getcha Some Productions Podcast

Getcha Some Productions Podcast Episode 36Buy the Book here: Unlocking Creativity by Michael Beinhorn https://amzn.to/3B9f458To support the podcast, shop on Reverb here: https://reverb.grsm.io/GetchaSomePlease like and subscribe:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_nc0nleQ5Yk_eKuNpkDFvQA podcast covering all things related to music production: from the first note to the last fan and everything in between.  We create music and inspire others to do the same.  Every episode is a live business meeting between me and Dan (me and Keith) as we build this media empire right before your very eyes/ears.In this episode we discuss:We discuss the introduction to the book Unlocking Creativity by Michael Beinhorn https://amzn.to/3B9f458Our plan and intention is to discuss the book chapter by chapter.  We are covering the introduction in the episode.We discuss several very interesting quotes from the introduction which help us to understand what this book is about.  We do a bit of riffing on the topics.Michael Beinhorn has worked with Herbie Hancock, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Soul Asylum, Hole, Soundgarden, Ozzy Osbourne, Courtney Love, Marilyn Manson, Social Distortion, Korn and Mew.This book is not about the technical aspects of record production.  It’s not about the microphones and preamps and technology.  It’s also not about where to place the microphones.  It’s about the artistry of record production.In this respect, it is more foundational because this aspect of the artistry of production and creativity will remain the same regardless of the technology and techniques which change over time.What is the point of making music anyway?  It is about communicating human emotion through music.  This book is foundational in that respect in that it deals with the primary motivation to to make music.  This book is about nurturing the emotional/human aspect of music.Music is the Kinetic manifestation of the potential energy of human emotions.  A book and a painting, for instance, are a manifestation of the potential energy of human emotion but they are not kinetic.  They are subject to entropy so they are representative of stored energy but they are not kinetic.  Music doesn’t exist at all unless there is an input of energy.The highest calling of a record production company, management company and/or record label is to support and facilitate artistry but not get in the way.So, what the hell is this book about:His perspective on making records.His credo and/or intent that drives his creative process.Interesting way to effect change in creative situations and the creative processes of others.The creative process in general and what it feels like to be in the midst of the process.Dan reflects on the experience of recording one of The Handshake songs.  He thinks it was the song Electricity.  Links below:The Handshake Streaming LinksFull Album:YouTube https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5n4xoKs6aAuBifgXaFzCscMvO72GvAZASpotify https://open.spotify.com/artist/4SJ8fGm8x5ajeYxwwPDLwG?si=-pe2PSpiTuyo-cf4YK_a_AApple Music https://music.apple.com/us/album/the-handshake/552979025My takeaways and hopes and dreams for our production efforts:To be Transparent.To be a true Artist.To be a Mentor.To be a Coach.To be a Creative.Bug out with us!!Once again, please buy the book through our link to help us out!Unlocking Creativity by Michael Beinhorn https://amzn.to/3B9f458#MusicProduction#DIYMusician#MusicRecording#MusicTechnique#TheArtistsLife#Creativity#Creative Music#Music#10,000Hours#TheHandshake#GetchaSomeGuitar#OliversMusicalGenius#ErosPragma#Mitochondriac

36mins

18 Jul 2021

Most Popular

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Michael Beinhorn: “We were doing the RIGHT thing, in the RIGHT place, at the RIGHT time...”

Everyone Loves Guitar

On this in-depth Michael Beinhorn interview, Michael explains how he went from being a synth player in Material, a local Manhattan band… to co-writing, playing and producing Herbie Hancock’s smash hit, Rockit! Dealing with divorce, moving cross country, getting fired from his band, the unethical aspect of the music business… his reputation for firing drummers, working with Herbie Hancock, Red Hot Chili Peppers Soul Asylum, Ozzy Osbourne (and why Ozzy hated being in the studio), Mike Ness (Social Distortion), Chris Cornell, Soundgarden, Marilyn Manson, Twiggy (from Manson’s band), Hole… the challenge about being creative that many artists face once they become successful (VERY interesting), an incredibly helpful discussion about faulty belief systems and how they, unfortunately, rule and ruin, so many of our lives, and LOADS more. INCREDIBLY inspirational, great conversation, this one’s a MUST: If you’d like to support this show: http://www.everyonelovesguitar.com/support Michael Beinhorn is a successful record producer, composer, author, and musician, who’s worked with: Brian Eno, Nile Rodgers, David Byrne, Whitney Houston, Herbie Hancock, Fab Five Freddy, Nona Hendryx, Lenny White, Violent Femmes, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Ozzy Osbourne, Aerosmith, Soundgarden, Soul Asylum, Marilyn Manson, Living Colour, Social Distortion, Hole, Korn (#2 Billboard LP, Untouchables, platinum), Fuel, The Bronx,  Afrika Bambaataa, Pet Shop Boys, Janet Jackson, The Cult, Black Label Society and hundreds of others His projects have combined record sales at over 45 million copies worldwide, and he’s the only record producer in history to have 2 separate recordings debut in the Billboard Top Ten in the same week (Marilyn Manson’s Mechanical Animals @ #1 & Hole’s Celebrity Skin @ #9) Subscribe YT: https://www.youtube.com/c/EveryoneLovesGuitar?sub_confirmation=1 Website:  https://www.everyonelovesguitar.com/subscribe

2hr 55mins

16 Jul 2021

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26. Michael Beinhorn

The Radical with Nick Terzo

The Red Hot Chili Peppers. Soundgarden. Herbie Hancock. Their records all have one thing in common: the fantastic production skills of Michael Beinhorn. Starting out as a founder of the legendary post-punk band Material, Michael eventually realized that his destiny lay behind the mixing console, not the microphone. Almost winning a Grammy started Michael on a career filled with both seminal albums and creative revelations. Join long-time friends Nick and Michael for an incredibly revealing conversation, as they discuss the ethereal workings of the creative process, the pros and cons of being a record producer, and the long road Michael traveled from music prodigy to creative philanthropist. HIGHLIGHTS: [01:50] Michael marvels at how modern technology has changed how music is made [05:42] Michael reminisces about playing in Material and producing other artists at the same time [08:14] Michael realized early on that producing, not performing, was his passion [10:07] Michael and Nick pay their respects to the legends of the Seattle scene that are no longer with us [12:12] Producing a hit record was not Michael's "golden ticket" to the music biz [14:25] Michael landed a gig that changed everything: producing the Red Hot Chili Peppers [20:11] Michael explains his philosophy of what it takes to be a great producer [25:40] Michael's reputation as a "taskmaster" with Soundgarden scared other artists away [29:10] Michael examines the tricky balancing act of being a producer versus befriending the artists [32:18] Michael discusses his book "Unlocking Creativity", and his theories about being creative [33:52] Feelings and intuition play an important part in both producing and enjoying music [36:38] Staying busy and engaged with other peoples' music keeps Michael's creative energy flowing [38:59] Michael relates to Bob Fosse when it comes to working with inexperienced talent [40:57] Michael learned to put aside the ego-boosting of his past work and embrace what he can bring to artists today [43:45] Michael finds the time to participate in an entertainment-based philanthropic endeavor to help with Covid relief Thanks for listening! Tune in next week and don’t forget to take a minute to review the podcast. In this incredibly competitive podcasting world, every piece of feedback helps. Follow our social media channels for last-minute announcements and guest reveals @theradicalpod on Instagram and Facebook. Find out more about today’s guest, Michael Beinhorn Find out more about your host, Nick Terzo MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE: @ChiliPeppers @kiedis @flea_official @johnfrusciante @itspetergabriel @soundgarden @chriscornell @soulasylum @herbiehancock @TheClash @nagualsite @holerock @marilynmanson

46mins

12 Feb 2021

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RSR258 - Michael Beinhorn - The Art Of Remote Pre Production

Recording Studio Rockstars

My guest today is Michael Beinhorn who has lived his life in the pursuit of artistic expression, first as a visual artist, then as a performer, and finally as a record producer.  Michael began in 1979 as co-founder of the seminal New York musical collective Material and has since produced and or recorded a long list of artists including Brian Eno’s “Lizard Point” from “Ambient 4: On Land.”, Herbie Hancock’s Future Shock, which included the groundbreaking cut “Rockit.”,  the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ breakthrough albums “The Uplift Mofo Party Plan” and “Mother’s Milk”. Michael’s recordings have achieved combined worldwide sales of more than 45 million albums helping to define the careers of a diverse range of artists, including Soul Asylum, Hole, Soundgarden, Ozzy Osbourne, Courtney Love, Marilyn Manson, Social Distortion, Korn, and Mew.  Over the past 20 years, Michael has become increasingly aware of the concerns facing artists and producers alike who are trying to maintain their creative ethics, personal expression and focus in the recording process. He has increasingly devoted his attention to artist development, the changing music industry and various ways to improve the quality of contemporary popular music.  For this reason, he has been increasingly active in mentoring fellow artists and aspiring record producers. He has extensively addressed these (and other pertinent) issues in his book, “Unlocking Creativity” published by Hal Leonard. He has also started an innovative online consulting service (Beinhorn Creative) that remotely provides all the functionality of music production to artists who would otherwise, be unable to afford these services.  Thanks to our sponsors! OWC: Other World Computing: https://www.OWC.com JZ Microphones: https://usashop.jzmic.com Spectra1964: https://www.spectra1964.com Presonus Studio One: https://www.presonus.com API Audio: http://www.apiaudio.com/ RSR Academy: http://RSRockstars.com/Academy Want to learn more about mixing? Get Free mix training with Lij at: http://MixMasterBundle.com Hear more on Youtube If you love the podcast, then please Leave a review on iTunes here CLICK HERE FOR SHOW NOTES AT: http://RSRockstars.com/258

59mins

14 Aug 2020

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From The West Barn Podcast - Michael Beinhorn - Making Epic Rock Records That Changed The Decade!

From The West Barn: With Joe West & Mike Shimshack

Joe & Mike talk with legendary Grammy Award winning rock producer Michael Beinhorn! Topics include; The making of Soundgarden’s “Superunknown”, Soundgarden thinking that “Black Hole Sun” was not all that great of a song, the ground loop story at Right Track recording studio in NYC, Hole’s “Celebrity Skin” guitar tones, the importance of preproduction, evolving as a producer in an ever-changing music business.  + Much more!! "From The West Barn" is a weekly podcast hosted by Joe West & Mike Shimshack shot at The West Barn in Nashville, TN. It's available anywhere podcasts are available.  West/Shimshack are both music industry veterans that have seen the peaks and valleys of the business over the past 30 years. Their careers have been punctuated with Grammy wins, hit songs, platinum records, tens of millions of units sold and more than their share of failure.  Tune into "From The West Barn" for their take on the lifestyle and engaging conversations with some of the industries most interesting people! Nothing is off the table ~ FTWB  MICHAEL BEINHORN —}  Website: https://www.michaelbeinhorn.com/ Book: http://www.michaelbeinhorn.com/media/#bookPanel MIKE SHIMSHACK ---}  Instagram: @shackjonz  JOE WEST ---}  Website: https://joe-west.com School: https://www.apprenticeacademy.net Instagram: @west_joe  Facebook: https://facebook.com/westjoe SPONSORS ---}  HERCULES STANDS:  http://herculesstands.com/us/ SLINGSTUDIO:  https://www.myslingstudio.com/ APPRENTICE ACADEMY:  http://www.apprenticeacademy.net FROM THE WEST BARN copyright 2020

1hr 9mins

11 Aug 2020

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Michael Beinhorn (producer for Soundgarden, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Herbie Hancock, and many more; author of “Unlocking Creativity: A Producer's Guide to Making Music & Art.”)

This Is Not A Bit

Michael Beinhorn takes being a producer very seriously.  This singularity of purpose shows in the ground-breaking albums he’s produced, including Soundgarden’s “Superunknown,” The Red Hot Chili Peppers’ “Mothers Milk” and “Uplift Mofo Party Plan,” Herbie Hancock’s “Future Shock,” and many more.  Michael has worked with such artists as Ozzy Osbourne, Aerosmith, Marilyn Manson, Hole, Violent Femmes, and Soul Asylum.  Michael was also a member of the legendary genre-defying New York band Material in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s.In this interview, Michael discusses his “alternate reality” approach to producing Herbie Hancock, why “Superunknown” shouldn’t be thought of as a “grunge” record, and what drew him to work with the Red Hot Chili Peppers at the time of their commercial and creative breakout period.  He also discusses his latest project, Beinhorn Creative - the world’s first production-based online music company (at BeinhornCreative.com), which allows him to produce artists across the globe remotely and in real time.  Michael also talks about the inspiration for his fascinating book “Unlocking Creativity: A Producer's Guide to Making Music & Art.”

45mins

16 Jul 2020

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Michael Beinhorn - The Problems Facing The Music Industry & How To Improve Them

Music Insights With Niclas Jeppsson

Michael Beinhorn is a music producer who has done records for bands such as Red Hot Chili Peppers, Soundgarden, Herbie Hancock, Marilyn Manson to just name a few.Michael is a very passionate man and this interview took quite a different direction than I expected. We spent quite a lot of time talking about:• Everything that’s wrong with the music business and record labels• Why artists need to continue to innovate and take music to the next level• Why we need to demand more excellence in music and art• Why Michael is mad about that we are still referring to The Beatles as something to inspire toThis is something that Michael is very passionate about and I found his ideas and viewpoints very interestingWe also touched on:• What it takes to make a great rock record• Growing up in New York in the ‘70s• Gentrification and how it kills the art sceneAnd much moreGet Exclusive Access by joining the email list here: https://www.youraudiosolutions.com/exclusive-accessConnect with Michael on:https://beinhorncreative.com/https://www.facebook.com/michael.beinhornhttps://www.instagram.com/michaelbeinhorn/?hl=enMixing & Mastering - https://www.niclasjeppsson.com/

1hr 30mins

24 Jun 2020

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