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Liz Carlisle

26 Podcast Episodes

Latest 26 Nov 2022 | Updated Daily

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182 Liz Carlisle – Regeneration is nothing new, let’s honour the indigenous history

Investing in Regenerative Agriculture and Food

A conversation with Liz Carlisle, writer of Healing Grounds, about the deep racism that exists in agriculture and food and in the regenerative agriculture movement as well. A deep dive in the real origin story of the Green Revolution, the black farming movement in the US, the deep roots of colonisation in agriculture and what we should learn from that.---------------------------------------------------Join our Gumroad community, discover the tiers and benefits on www.gumroad.com/investinginregenag. Support our work:Share itGive a 5-star ratingBuy us a coffee… or a meal! www.Ko-fi.com/regenerativeagriculture----------------------------------------------------We stand on the shoulders of giants in the indigenous farming and land management space, but choose not to mention them. All practices we currently call regenerative are not new, but have been around for a long time and we choose to broadly not acknowledge that and look away when it comes to thorny topics like land ownership, access to land, access to finance, etc. So, let’s get real and discuss all these things.More about this episode on https://investinginregenerativeagriculture.com/liz-carlisle-2.Find our video course on https://investinginregenerativeagriculture.com/course.----------------------------------------------------For feedback, ideas, suggestions please contact us through Twitter @KoenvanSeijen, or get in touch through the website www.investinginregenerativeagriculture.com. Join our newsletter on www.eepurl.com/cxU33P. The above references an opinion and is for information and educational purposes only. It is not intended to be investment advice. Seek a duly licensed professional for investment advice.Support the show Support the showFeedback, ideas, suggestions? - Twitter @KoenvanSeijen - Get in touch www.investinginregenerativeagriculture.comJoin our newsletter on www.eepurl.com/cxU33P! Support the showThanks for listening and sharing!...

59mins

30 Aug 2022

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UC Santa Barbara Professor Of Environmental Studies Liz Carlisle On Her New Book Healing Grounds And The Deep Roots Of Regenerative Farming

Track & Food Podcast

Presented by Scout Magazine. The book Healing Grounds – Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming came onto my radar while reading an interview with its author, Liz Carlisle, published last March by Civil Eats, an American news source focused on sustainable food systems. Carlisle, an Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, teaches food and farming at UC Santa Barbara.Healing Grounds, her third book, tells stories of Indigenous, Black, Latinx, and Asian American farmers who are reviving their ancestors’ methods of growing food — techniques long suppressed by the industrial food system. These farmers are restoring native prairies, nurturing beneficial fungi, and enriching soil health. Through feeding their communities and revitalizing cultural ties to the land, they are also steadily stitching ecosystems back together and repairing the natural carbon cycle. According to Carlisle, this is the true regenerative agriculture – not merely a set of technical tricks, but a holistic approach that values diversity in both plants and people.Having recently discovered the regenerative farming movement via another book, Eating to Extinction (author Dan Saladino was a Track & Food guest in February), I wondered where Carlisle’s narratives fell within its scope. In this episode, we dig deep into each chapter of Healing Grounds, to discuss how they unfolded, what she learned along the way, and how she came to adopt her book title’s double entendre. This is definitely one of my favourite interviews, so far, and I’m confident you’ll enjoy listening to it also.Liz Carlisle is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Studies Program at UC Santa Barbara, where she teaches courses on food and farming. Born and raised in Montana, she got hooked on agriculture while working as an aide to organic farmer and U.S. Senator Jon Tester, which led to a decade of research and writing collaborations with farmers in her home state. She has written three books about regenerative farming and agroecology: Lentil Underground (2015), Grain by Grain (2019, with co-author Bob Quinn), and most recently, Healing Grounds: Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming (2022). She is also a frequent contributor to both academic journals and popular media outlets, focusing on food and farm policy, incentivizing soil health practices, and supporting new entry farmers. She holds a Ph.D. in Geography, from UC Berkeley, and a B.A. in Folklore and Mythology, from Harvard University. Prior to her career as a writer and academic, she spent several years touring rural America as a country singer.

1hr 3mins

15 Jun 2022

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Liz Carlisle, "Healing Grounds: Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming" (Island Press, 2022)

New Books in Environmental Studies

A powerful movement is happening in farming today—farmers are reconnecting with their roots to fight climate change. For one woman, that’s meant learning her tribe’s history to help bring back the buffalo. For another, it’s meant preserving forest purchased by her great-great-uncle, among the first wave of African Americans to buy land. Others are rejecting monoculture to grow corn, beans, and squash the way farmers in Mexico have done for centuries. Still others are rotating crops for the native cuisines of those who fled the “American wars” in Southeast Asia.In Healing Grounds: Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming (Island Press, 2022), Liz Carlisle tells the stories of Indigenous, Black, Latinx, and Asian American farmers who are reviving their ancestors’ methods of growing food—techniques long suppressed by the industrial food system. These farmers are restoring native prairies, nurturing beneficial fungi, and enriching soil health. While feeding their communities and revitalizing cultural ties to land, they are steadily stitching ecosystems back together and repairing the natural carbon cycle. This, Carlisle shows, is the true regenerative agriculture – not merely a set of technical tricks for storing CO2 in the ground, but a holistic approach that values diversity in both plants and people.Liz Carlisle is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Studies Program at UC Santa Barbara, where she teaches courses on food and farming. Born and raised in Montana, she got hooked on agriculture while working as an aide to organic farmer and U.S. Senator Jon Tester, which led to a decade of research and writing collaborations with farmers in her home state. She has written three books about regenerative farming and agroecology: Lentil Underground (2015), Grain by Grain (2019, with co-author Bob Quinn), and most recently, Healing Grounds: Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming (2022). She is also a frequent contributor to both academic journals and popular media outlets, focusing on food and farm policy, incentivizing soil health practices, and supporting new entry farmers. She holds a Ph.D. in Geography, from UC Berkeley, and a B.A. in Folklore and Mythology, from Harvard University. Prior to her career as a writer and academic, she spent several years touring rural America as a country singer.Susan Grelock-Yusem, PhD, is an independent researcher trained in depth psychology, with an emphasis on community, liberation, and eco-psychologies. Her work centers around interconnection and encompasses regenerative food systems, the arts and conservation. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

51mins

23 May 2022

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Liz Carlisle, "Healing Grounds: Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming" (Island Press, 2022)

New Books in Food

A powerful movement is happening in farming today—farmers are reconnecting with their roots to fight climate change. For one woman, that’s meant learning her tribe’s history to help bring back the buffalo. For another, it’s meant preserving forest purchased by her great-great-uncle, among the first wave of African Americans to buy land. Others are rejecting monoculture to grow corn, beans, and squash the way farmers in Mexico have done for centuries. Still others are rotating crops for the native cuisines of those who fled the “American wars” in Southeast Asia.In Healing Grounds: Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming (Island Press, 2022), Liz Carlisle tells the stories of Indigenous, Black, Latinx, and Asian American farmers who are reviving their ancestors’ methods of growing food—techniques long suppressed by the industrial food system. These farmers are restoring native prairies, nurturing beneficial fungi, and enriching soil health. While feeding their communities and revitalizing cultural ties to land, they are steadily stitching ecosystems back together and repairing the natural carbon cycle. This, Carlisle shows, is the true regenerative agriculture – not merely a set of technical tricks for storing CO2 in the ground, but a holistic approach that values diversity in both plants and people.Liz Carlisle is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Studies Program at UC Santa Barbara, where she teaches courses on food and farming. Born and raised in Montana, she got hooked on agriculture while working as an aide to organic farmer and U.S. Senator Jon Tester, which led to a decade of research and writing collaborations with farmers in her home state. She has written three books about regenerative farming and agroecology: Lentil Underground (2015), Grain by Grain (2019, with co-author Bob Quinn), and most recently, Healing Grounds: Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming (2022). She is also a frequent contributor to both academic journals and popular media outlets, focusing on food and farm policy, incentivizing soil health practices, and supporting new entry farmers. She holds a Ph.D. in Geography, from UC Berkeley, and a B.A. in Folklore and Mythology, from Harvard University. Prior to her career as a writer and academic, she spent several years touring rural America as a country singer.Susan Grelock-Yusem, PhD, is an independent researcher trained in depth psychology, with an emphasis on community, liberation, and eco-psychologies. Her work centers around interconnection and encompasses regenerative food systems, the arts and conservation. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/food

51mins

23 May 2022

Most Popular

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Healing Grounds: Liz Carlisle & Aidee Guzman | Ep. 55

Real Food Media

Colonialism is at the root of the problems we see in our food system, and, as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recently stated, it is also at the root of the climate crisis. By cultivating diversity within the soil and amongst farmers, we can work towards a liberated future. “Healing Grounds: Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming” by Liz Carlisle shares the stories of Black, Indigenous, Latino, and Asian-American farmers around the United States who are using their ancestral agricultural traditions to heal the soil, build climate resilience, connect with their culture, and create pathways for racial justice. Tiffani’s conversation with author Liz Carlisle and scientist Aidee Guzman highlights what is possible when we focus on diversity above and below ground. SHOW NOTES:02:25 | The four per mille study and why regenerative agriculture has sparked hope in recent years. 04:35 | What’s possible when you take “regeneration” and regenerative agriculture to heart06:25 | Aidee Guzman’s research on soil health and habits of bees on diverse farms vs monoculture farms in California’s Central Valley 07:56 | The 450 million year old fungi that helped bring plants to the land.10:05 | How to support a diversity of farmers and farming techniques13:53 | History of agroecology in Mexico and how it intersected with the Green Revolution19:33 | There’s no such thing as a weed 21:35 | For Aidee, there are two distinct worlds of agriculture25:12 | Reciprocal farm labor practices abroad and in the US29:40 | How the agricultural industry in the US was designed and why it is extractive today32:45 | The one thing Liz Carlisle and Aidee Guzman want you to know about climate, justice, and the deep roots of regenerative farming. DIG IN: To learn more about Aidee Guzman, visit https://www.aideeguzman.com/To learn more about Liz Carlisle, visit https://www.lizcarlisle.com/​​For more on this episode, including the transcript, visit: https://realfoodmedia.org/portfolio/healing-grounds/Join the Real Food Reads book club: https://realfoodmedia.org/programs/real-food-reads/ Become a Patreon supporter for early access to our episodes and premium content with the authors here https://www.patreon.com/realfoodmedia

34mins

3 May 2022

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Liz Carlisle, Ph.D, author of Healing Grounds: Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming

Food Sleuth Radio

Did you know that regenerative farming methods are not “new,” but have been practiced by indigenous farmers for centuries? Join Food Sleuth Radio host and Registered Dietitian, Melinda Hemmelgarn, for her interview with Liz Carlisle, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the Environmental Studies Program at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and author of Healing Grounds: Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming. Carlisle discusses the powerful movement that’s happening in farming today, that reconnects farmers with their roots to fight climate change. Carlisle amplifies the voices of Indigenous, Black, Latinx, and Asian American farmers who are reviving their ancestors’ methods of growing food—techniques long suppressed by the industrial food system. Listen to Dr. Carlisle’s Island Press webinar here: Island Press webinar: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KV7FFn3-IiA Related website:  https://www.lizcarlisle.com/ 

28mins

28 Apr 2022

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Examining Our Food + Farming System with Dr. Liz Carlisle

The Sakara Life Podcast

In this episode, we sit down with country singer-turned-environmentalist, Dr. Liz Carlisle, who is also an Assistant Professor at UCSB and author of multiple books (including her latest, Healing Grounds). Throughout this episode, we discuss how soil is the foundation for the health of our ecosystem and nutritional value of food - and how we need to make changes to our farming practices for true change. We discuss all of the intricacies of the food and farming systems and how all of the inputs impact what winds up on our plate. Dr. Carlisle champions the notion that for true change - we need to reverence for the earth, the soil, and one another. We hope you find this episode as informative as we did and that it encourages you to more carefully consider the impacts of your choices when it comes to food and interacting with one another and the environment. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

40mins

12 Apr 2022

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Liz Carlisle on regenerative agriculture | Living Mirrors #89

Living Mirrors with Dr. James Cooke

Liz Carlisle is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Studies Program at UC Santa Barbara, where she teaches courses on food and farming. She’s the author of three books, Lentil Underground, Grain by Grain, and Healing Grounds: Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming, all of which explore regenerative agriculture and agroecology.

57mins

7 Apr 2022

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iEat Green - 03.24.22 - Liz Carlisle

iEat Green with Bhavani

Liz Carlisle is an Assistant Professor in theEnvironmental Studies Program at UC Santa Barbara,where she teaches courses on food and farming.Born and raised in Montana, she got hooked onagriculture while working as an aide to organic farmerand U.S. Senator Jon Tester, which led to a decade ofresearch and writing collaborations with farmers in herhome state. She has written three books aboutregenerative farming and agroecology: LentilUnderground (2015), Grain by Grain (2019, with co-author Bob Quinn), and most recently, HealingGrounds: Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots ofRegenerative Farming (2022). Prior to her career as awriter and academic, she spent several years touringrural America as a country singer. Asian Stir Fry with Tofu and Peanuts Preheat oven to 350°1 block of extra-firm tofu cut into cubes, and driedbetween 2 dish towelsoil spray1 onion, cut in half, then sliced into slivers2 carrots, cut2 Japanese Eggplants, cut3 Tbs grated ginger2 Tbs minced garlic1 stalk celery, diced1 small head broccoli raab2 cups Napa Cabbage2 cups Bok Choy1 red pepper, dicedOlive oil4 Tbs. Tamari (to taste)2 Tbs. Aji Mirin cooking wine2 Tbs. dark sesame oil1 t. hot sesame oil or red pepper flakes (optional)1 cup lightly salted peanuts¼ cup chopped cilantro, optional1. In a wok or saucepan, set up a steamer and steam the eggplant and carrots, just until soft.2. Meanwhile, prepare a cookie sheet with parchment paper and spray with oil. Toss the tofu cubes with1 Tbs. minced garlic and 1 Tbs. grated ginger, and lay out onto cookie sheet. Bake until golden brown,turning as needed, about 10-15 minutes. Splash with 2 Tbs. of Tamari and 2 Tbs. of Mirin and returnto oven for 5 more minutes. Remove from oven and set aside.3. Meanwhile, lightly cover the bottom of wok with oil. When oil is hot, add the onions, and cook for afew minutes, then add the celery and red pepper.4. Add the remaining garlic and ginger. Along with the broccoli raab, continue cooking at med. high heat,stirring constantly for 5 minutes.5. Add the Napa cabbage and boy choy. . Add a little water if needed to prevent sticking. Cook for a fewminutes more, then add the Tofu, steamed carrots, and eggplant, the 2 Tbs. Aji Mirin, dark sesame oiland Tamari.6. Add the peanuts and optional cilantroServe with Brown Rice or Udon Noodles

58mins

24 Mar 2022

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Should we radically change the way we farm? Liz Carlisle talks regenerative agriculture

The Economy, Land & Climate Podcast

Liz Carlisle talks to Bertie about her new book, soon to be published by Island Press: 'Healing Grounds - Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming'. The agroecologist, Environmental Studies Professor and award-winning author has spent the last year talking to Indigenous communities & farmers of colour across North America about their approaches to land, crop cultivation and livestock. Originally looking to learn more about soil sequestration, she was confronted with bigger picture issues about the relationships between climate policy, social justice, and agriculture.Liz's further reading: ·        HEAL Platform for Real Food·        Soul Fire Farm·        Vox’s coverage of Cory Booker and Elizabeth Warren’s farming legislation·        IPES Food reports ·        Adam Calo’s work on Scottish low carbon farming·        You can order Liz Carlisle’s previous books on agroecology on her website

33mins

18 Feb 2022

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