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Hubert Harrison

7 Podcast Episodes

Latest 1 Oct 2022 | Updated Daily

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Dr. Jeffrey B. Perry's Bio of Hubert Harrison: The Struggle for Equality

In the Author's Corner with Etienne

Within two weeks we'll be completing Black History Month, but for my fellow-US Virgin Islanders we'll be initiating Virgin Islands History Month. And to kick off our celebration and education of a founding father, Professor Dr. Jeffrey B. Perry will be serving as our guest educating and enlightening us about Mr. Hubert Harrison, a native son from St. Croix, US Virgin Islands.“The two-volume biography of Hubert Harrison is extremely important,” statesDr. Perrywho believes this two-volume biography is the first, full-life, multi-volume biography of an Afro-Caribbean and the fourth of an African American after those of Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Langston Hughes.”VisitHubert Harrison: The Struggle for Equality, 1918-1927at Columbia University Press and Dr. Perry’s site and get Volume I and/or Volume 2 at 20% discount via Code “CUP20”.Airing Times in the USA: 8:00 pm AST, 7:00 pm EST, 6:00 pm CST, 5:00 pm MST, 4:00 pm PST. For our international listeners, copy and paste www [dot] timeanddate [dot] com/time/zones/  for your time. Looking forward to seeing and hearing you there!

1hr 11mins

2 Mar 2021

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Jeffrey B. Perry, "Hubert Harrison: The Struggle for Equality, 1918–1927" (Columbia UP, 2020)

New Books in African American Studies

Hubert Harrison: The Struggle for Equality, 1918-1927 (Columbia University 2020) by Jeffrey B. Perry, independent scholar and archivist, is an extensive intellectual history of the life and work of Black radical and autodidact Hubert Harrison. Perry is also editor of A Hubert Harrison Reader (Wesleyan, 2001) and author of Hubert Harrison: The Voice of Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918 (Columbia, 2008). He is the chief biographer of Hubert Harrison and Hubert Harrison: The Struggle for Equality is a follow up to his aforementioned text on Harrison. (these two volumes can be ordered from Columbia University Press at 20% discount by using Code CUP20). Perry’s volume on Harrison’s life from 1883 to 1918 is considered to be the first volume of an Afro-Caribbean “and only the fourth of an African American after those of Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Langston Hughes” (1). This current text is a continuation of the argument advanced in Perry’s initial text on Harrison. Harrison is often left out of major surveys of the Harlem Renaissance and New Negro Era, as Perry notes, and this is likely because the Renaissance is often viewed as a movement of Black intellectual elites with formal higher education. That said, Harrison was a working-class self-taught man who wrote reviews, essays, orations and was recognized by intellectual elites of his day and a member of the Socialist Party of America.Harrison was born in Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands in 1883 but relocated to the Harlem section of New York City in 1900, at age seventeen, where he eventually became a recognized writer, cultural critic, orator, editor and political activist including working with Marcus Garvey’s Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA). Perry defines Harrison as “the voice” of Harlem radicalism and also a “radical internationalist.” This is a challenge to standard views of the New Negro Era that tend to place intellectuals such as Alain Locke and W.E.B. Du Bois at the helm of Black thought and culture during the Harlem Renaissance moment in African American history. That said, Harrison was also involved with Garvey’s UNIA as editor of the Negro World and in labor activism. Harrison formed the Liberty League in 1917 and The Voice that helped to lay the foundation of the Garvey Movement and the Rise of the UNIA. He was involved in the major debates of his day including discussions about class consciousness, Black nationalism, internationalism, freethought and trade unionism. This second volume by Perry is very necessary given Harrison’s extensive engagement with the ideas and the production of knowledge as a self-taught organic intellectual with deep concerns about human liberation across class and race.Hubert Harrison: The Struggle for Black Equality is organized into four major sections divided by twenty chapters including an “Epilogue.” It is a far-reaching text of more than 700 pages. Part I focuses on Harrison’s work with The Voice and his political activities in places such as Washington, D.C. and Virginia, In Part II, Harrison’s role as editor of the Negro World is assessed with a discussion of his debates and writings. Part III concerns Harrison’s work as a “freelance educator” and his work as a writer and speaker, while the final part of the text Part IV covers his role as a Black radical internationalist. This is a critically important text. Scholars of the Harlem Renaissance will find it difficult to dismiss Hubert Harrison as a major voice of the New Negro Era with the publication of this text. Perry’s painstaking coverage of Harrison gives him his rightful place in history as “the voice of Harlem radicalism.”Hettie V. Williams Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of African American history in the Department of History and Anthropology at Monmouth University where she teaches courses in African American history and U.S. history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

1hr 14mins

18 Jan 2021

Similar People

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Jeffrey B. Perry, "Hubert Harrison: The Struggle for Equality, 1918–1927" (Columbia UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Hubert Harrison: The Struggle for Equality, 1918-1927 (Columbia University 2020) by Jeffrey B. Perry, independent scholar and archivist, is an extensive intellectual history of the life and work of Black radical and autodidact Hubert Harrison. Perry is also editor of A Hubert Harrison Reader (Wesleyan, 2001) and author of Hubert Harrison: The Voice of Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918 (Columbia, 2008). He is the chief biographer of Hubert Harrison and Hubert Harrison: The Struggle for Equality is a follow up to his aforementioned text on Harrison. (these two volumes can be ordered from Columbia University Press at 20% discount by using Code CUP20). Perry’s volume on Harrison’s life from 1883 to 1918 is considered to be the first volume of an Afro-Caribbean “and only the fourth of an African American after those of Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Langston Hughes” (1). This current text is a continuation of the argument advanced in Perry’s initial text on Harrison. Harrison is often left out of major surveys of the Harlem Renaissance and New Negro Era, as Perry notes, and this is likely because the Renaissance is often viewed as a movement of Black intellectual elites with formal higher education. That said, Harrison was a working-class self-taught man who wrote reviews, essays, orations and was recognized by intellectual elites of his day and a member of the Socialist Party of America.Harrison was born in Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands in 1883 but relocated to the Harlem section of New York City in 1900, at age seventeen, where he eventually became a recognized writer, cultural critic, orator, editor and political activist including working with Marcus Garvey’s Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA). Perry defines Harrison as “the voice” of Harlem radicalism and also a “radical internationalist.” This is a challenge to standard views of the New Negro Era that tend to place intellectuals such as Alain Locke and W.E.B. Du Bois at the helm of Black thought and culture during the Harlem Renaissance moment in African American history. That said, Harrison was also involved with Garvey’s UNIA as editor of the Negro World and in labor activism. Harrison formed the Liberty League in 1917 and The Voice that helped to lay the foundation of the Garvey Movement and the Rise of the UNIA. He was involved in the major debates of his day including discussions about class consciousness, Black nationalism, internationalism, freethought and trade unionism. This second volume by Perry is very necessary given Harrison’s extensive engagement with the ideas and the production of knowledge as a self-taught organic intellectual with deep concerns about human liberation across class and race.Hubert Harrison: The Struggle for Black Equality is organized into four major sections divided by twenty chapters including an “Epilogue.” It is a far-reaching text of more than 700 pages. Part I focuses on Harrison’s work with The Voice and his political activities in places such as Washington, D.C. and Virginia, In Part II, Harrison’s role as editor of the Negro World is assessed with a discussion of his debates and writings. Part III concerns Harrison’s work as a “freelance educator” and his work as a writer and speaker, while the final part of the text Part IV covers his role as a Black radical internationalist. This is a critically important text. Scholars of the Harlem Renaissance will find it difficult to dismiss Hubert Harrison as a major voice of the New Negro Era with the publication of this text. Perry’s painstaking coverage of Harrison gives him his rightful place in history as “the voice of Harlem radicalism.”Hettie V. Williams Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of African American history in the Department of History and Anthropology at Monmouth University where she teaches courses in African American history and U.S. history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

1hr 14mins

18 Jan 2021

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Conversation w/Dr. Jeffrey Perry: Hubert Harrison: Black Griot

Black FreeThinkers

Dr. Jeffrey B. Perry (Jeff Perry) is an independant, working class scholar. formally educated at Princeton, Harvard, Rutgers, and Columbia. Volume 2 of his Hubert Harrison biography entitled "Hubert Harrison: The Struggle for Equality, 1918-1927" (Columbia University Press) was recently published in November 2020.Dr. Perry, an archivist, bibliophile, and historian, preserved and inventoried the "Hubert H. Harrison Papers" and helped to place them at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University and to develop the "Hubert H. Harrison Papers, 1893-1927: Finding Aid." These efforts, contributed to making writings of Hubert Harrison freely-accessible worldwide via the Hubert Harrison Papers Digital Collection on the Columbia University Rare Book and Manuscript Library website.

1hr 40mins

15 Jan 2021

Most Popular

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Update on Hubert Harrison, The Voice of Harlem Radicalism

Chatting with Dr Leonard Richardson

"Hubert Harrison was an immensely skilled writer, orator, educator, critic, and political activist who, more than any other political leader of his era, combined class consciousness and anti-white-supremacist race consciousness into a coherent political radicalism. Harrison's ideas profoundly influenced "New Negro" militants, including A. Philip Randolph and Marcus Garvey, and his synthesis of class and race issues is a key unifying link between the two great trends of the Black Liberation Movement: the labor- and civil-rights-based work of Martin Luther King Jr. and the race and nationalist platform associated with Malcolm X.""The foremost Black organizer, agitator, and theoretician of the Socialist Party of New York, Harrison was also the founder of the "New Negro" movement, the editor of Negro World, and the principal radical influence on the Garvey movement. He was a highly praised journalist and critic (reportedly the first regular Black book reviewer), a freethinker and early proponent of birth control, a supporter of Black writers and artists, a leading public intellectual, and a bibliophile who helped transform the 135th Street Public Library into an international center for research in Black culture. His biography offers profound insights on race, class, religion, immigration, war, democracy, and social change in America."--BOOK JACKET.Dr. Jeffrey B. Perry, an independent archivist, bibliophile, historian & working-class scholar formally educated at Princeton, Harvard, Rutgers, & Columbia. For 40+ years he's been active in the working class movement as a worker & as a union shop steward, officer, editor, & retiree. Dr. Perry, preserved & inventoried the "Hubert H. Harrison Papers". Visit him at: www.JeffreyBPerry.net/

1hr 6mins

10 Sep 2016

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A Panel of Two Authors Shining the Spotlight on Hubert Harrison

In the Author's Corner with Etienne

The Virgin Islands Literary Festival and Book Fair will feature several events highlighting the historic Crucian writer and  activist, Hubert Harrison, the weekend of March 26-29. Saturday evening, March 28th, there will be a performance of David Edgecombe’s play Hubert Harrison. Today we meet two gentlemen who diligently worked to bring the biography of a forgotten Virgin Islander to the forefront. One, an author, the other, a playwright, but they both wrote about Crucian-born Hubert Harrison,Dr. David Edgecombe, writer, director, instructor, and playwright has worked at the University of the Virgin Islands from 1990 to present. In 1992, he became director of the Reichhold Center for the Arts. He's "internationally known for several plays, including Strong Currents and Coming Home to Roost. Upon returning to the Islands, David joined the faculty at the University of the Virgin Islands and became their artist-in-residence, premièring his play, Heaven.Dr. Jeffrey Perry, formally educated at Princeton, Harvard, Rutgers, and Columbia,  preserved and inventoried the Hubert H. Harrison Papers and helped to place them at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University and to develop the Hubert H. Harrison Papers, 1893-1927: Finding Aid. He is the editor of A Hubert Harrison Reader (Wesleyan University Press, 2001) and the forthcoming Writings of Hubert Harrison.Dr. Perry will deliver a keynote address and a presentation discussing his work uncovering Harrison’s writings and documenting his story and work in Perry’s book, Hubert Harrison: The Voice of Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918 (Columbia University Press).Follow Dr. David Edgecombe and Dr. Jeffrey Perry on their Facebook page.

1hr 32mins

16 Mar 2015

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Conversation w/Jeffery B. Perry : Hubert Harrison & Invention of the White Race

Black FreeThinkers

Please join us Sunday, May 25, 2014 as we welcome Dr. Jeffery B. Perry to Black FreeThinkers.We will discuss Hubert Henry Harrison who is considered the Black Socrates.  Harrison is also know for his radical humanism, oratorical skills, and influence."The Invention of the White Race" by Theodore W. Allen, especially Vol. II: "The Origin of Racial Oppression in Anglo-America"."When the first Africans arrived in Virginia in 1619, there were no 'white' people there; nor, according to the colonial records, would there be for another sixty years." Theodore W. AllenTheodore W. Allen's "The Invention of the White Race," with its focus on racial oppression and social control, is one of the twentieth-century's major contributions to historical understanding. This two-volume classic (Vol. 1: "Racial Oppression and Social Control" and Vol. 2: "The Origin of Racial Oppression in Anglo-America") details how the "white race" was invented as a ruling-class social control formation and a system of racial oppression was imposed in response to labor solidarity in the wake of Bacon's Rebellion (1676-77), how the "white race" was created and maintained through "white race" privileges conferred on laboring class European-Americans relative to African-Americans, how these privileges were not in the interest of African-Americans or laboring class European-Americans, and how the "white race" has been the principal historic guarantor of ruling-class domination in America.

2hr 28mins

25 May 2014