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Edith Hall Podcasts

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12 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Edith Hall. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Edith Hall, often where they are interviewed.

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12 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Edith Hall. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Edith Hall, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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TGL021: Aristotle on How to Live The Good Life with Edith Hall

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On today's show, I talk with Edith Hall, the author of Aristotle’s Way: How Ancient Wisdom Can Change Your Life, and she is a Professor at King’s College in London. 

We talk about Aristotle, one of the earliest and greatest thinkers to take up the subject of the Good Life. He has had a major impact, especially in the West, on happiness and how we can live a flourishing life, but his writing can also be dry and tough going for the average reader.  


IN THIS EPISODE, YOU'LL LEARN:

  • Why it’s better to think of Happiness as something we do, not something we are
  • Why doing the right thing ethically is so important to happiness
  • How we all have a unique potential based on our talents
  • Why achieving our potential – the best version of ourselves - is so important
  • How to make better decisions
  • How to handle bad luck
  • The role that habits play in achieving the Good Life


BOOKS AND RESOURCES


CONNECT WITH EDITH HALL


GET IN TOUCH WITH SEAN MURRAY


HELP US OUT!

Help us reach new listeners by leaving us a rating and review! It takes less than 30 seconds and really helps our show grow, which allows us to bring on even better guests for you all! Thank you – we really appreciate it!

Jul 06 2020 · 28mins
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Episode 45 - Hercules (1997) (with Edith Hall)

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Bless my soul, we are definitely on a roll with Episode 45 of the Fantasy/Animation podcast, which continues the Disney Renaissance theme in its take on Hercules (Ron Clements and John Musker, 1997). To make sense of the visual culture of antiquity manifest in Disney’s cel-animated musical fantasy and its adaptation of Greek myth, Chris and Alex are joined by Edith Hall, Professor of Classics at King’s College London and a specialist in ancient Greek literature and cultural history. Listen as they discuss the film’s reworking of Hercules, Hades and Philoctetes alongside questions of tragedy, comedy and images of slavery; its combination of celebrity culture with Greek heroism and masculinity; the politics of Disneyfication operating in Hercules as a process situated between authenticity and animated representation; the visual character designs of British political cartoonist Gerard Scarfe; and its exhibitionist use of computer graphics in its portrayal of the multi-headed Hydra.

Apr 27 2020 · 1hr 1min

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Aristotle’s Way: How Ancient Wisdom Can Change Your Life by Edith Hall

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This week, Misty and Lisa take you back in time to learn how to be happy from Aristotle, via British scholar and author Edith Hall in her book Aristotle’s Way: How Ancient Wisdom Can Change Your Life.

One of Britain's foremost classicists, and a Professor at King's College London, Edith Hall is the first woman to have won the Erasmus Medal of the European Academy. In 2017 she was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from Athens University, just a few streets away from Aristotle's own Lyceum.

We think Amazon.com said it best: "In expert yet vibrant modern language, Hall lays out the crux of Aristotle's thinking, mixing affecting autobiographical anecdotes with a deep wealth of classical learning. For Hall, whose own life has been greatly improved by her understanding of Aristotle, this is an intensely personal subject. She distills his ancient wisdom into ten practical and universal lessons to help us confront life's difficult and crucial moments, summarizing a lifetime of the most rarefied and brilliant scholarship."

In this Aristotle’s Way book review, Lisa and Misty explore five of the ten chapters of the book, including: 

  1. Introduction
  2. Happiness
  3. Potential
  4. Decisions
  5. Communication 

If you like what you're hearing, you can purchase the book here.

You can also learn more about Edith Hall on her website here

And don't forget to subscribe, rate, and review Go Help Yourself

Jul 26 2019 · 49mins
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The Intentionally Happy Life – Interview with Edith Hall

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By Janae Jean and Spencer Schluter

For this month’s interview and podcast, we spoke with renowned author and lecturer, Edith Hall. Edith is a Professor in the Department of Classics and Centre for Hellenic Studies at King’s College in London, England. While she originally specialized in ancient Greek Literature, her work has expanded to include ancient Greek and Roman history, society and thought. She has published over 20 books. Her most recent book is Aristotle’s Way: How Ancient Wisdom Can Change Your Life, in which she explains how studying Aristotle’s ancient philosophy can help all of us live more fulfilling lives in the modern world.

When Edith is not writing or teaching, she frequently broadcasts on radio and television, consults with professional theaters and lectures internationally. She publishes in academic and mainstream magazines, publications and newspapers. You may follow or contact her via Twitter @EdithMayHall. Visit www.edithhall.co.uk.

The following is a brief excerpt of our in-depth conversation. To find out more about relationships, parenting, happiness, grit, and why it’s not too late to start achieving your dreams, listen to the entire interview at www.ConsciousCommunityMagazine.com or wherever you listen to podcasts. All 35 episodes of the Conscious Community Podcast are available on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, TuneIn, Player. FM, YouTube and other popular podcatchers.

Janae: How did you discover Aristotle? Was that at the university?

Edith: Yes. I was at Oxford studying classics and had to write a paper about making decisions in Greek tragedy. My great tutor told me to read the third book of Nicomachean Ethics series. It blew me away. For the first time in my life, I heard a voice that seemed to be describing exactly how I felt about moral dilemmas and my position in the world relative to other people, animals, ethics and everything. So, I got very excited and started to read the rest of this great mind. I was so amazed at how he developed a whole system of thinking; he’s actually the father of logic. It isn’t just about your personal life—your subjective self—everything interconnects. He’s very encouraging; the whole thing is written as if you apply this to your life, you will get happier. It’s a system of secular ethics. There is no god in it, but that doesn’t mean that he was an Atheist. He thought it was completely up to humans to create their own happiness. This spoke to me at that age in a very powerful way, because I had been very lost since I was about 13.

JJ: Your father was an Anglican priest, and growing up you were interested in astrology, Buddhism and Transcendental Meditation. How does Aristotle fit into all of that?

EH: For me, he was the non-mystical answer. He’s very modern. He doesn’t think you will ever be happy if you act out of accordance with your emotions. You’ve got to find a way for reason and emotion to go together at all times. It’s all part of the same system. He’s very holistic. This, for me, was extremely liberating.

JJ: In your writing, you talk about the importance of planning and how planning can lead us to happiness yet many people would think it’s the opposite.

SS: We have a very “instant gratification” society when it comes to self-improvement.

EH: It’s really about how you define “happiness.” Aristotelian happiness is not a passing mood that can be brought on by a “happy meal” or “happy hour.” It can only come from within yourself. It comes from that feeling of being able to look in the mirror and know that you have tried to do your best. If you’ve tried to be the best possible you, worked on your not-so-nice characteristics, recognized what you are really good at, and recognized your strong personal qualities and enhanced those further, then you get a really firm, really Teflon, sense of contentment, even if you have unbelievably bad luck. Aristotle says that he sees that people who are ‘bad’ are almost always really unhappy.

The other thing is Aristotle thinks that everybody is good at something, and that’s absolutely true. It may be parenting, gardening, making other people happy, cracking jokes, violin playing, Ancient Greek literature; it may be (you) discussing deep issues that make them accessible to the public. Happiness is being the best version of you and exercising it, and that’s what you want to do with your whole life. It’s a verb, not a noun. It is a way of doing everything with an approach.

SS: I heard a discussion on public radio about IQ and success. They said that most successful people have high IQs but having a high IQ does not mean you will be successful. The difference between somebody who is successful and one who is not is grit or determination.

EH: The crucial thing here, and this is why I think Aristotle is so helpful if you are a parent or in a job that has parental aspects, is helping the young discover what it is they are very good at. There is no greater gift than someone taking that seriously and talking about that with you. The key to it, if you are an Aristotelian, is what gives them the most pleasure.

SS: But, not in the Hedonistic sense?

EH: No. What I tried to do with my kids was to let them do what they wanted, but I exposed them to as many things as I possibly could. For example, my youngest has just gone to university to study Japanese, and there’s no study of Oriental languages in my family. I thought, “Where on Earth did she get that from?” She told me, “Mummy, don’t you remember you took me to see that manga film, Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, when I was eight?” I had completely forgotten that. But she said that was a moment she realized she loved everything about it. When she said that, it really moved me.

This is where I can get a little bit mystical. One of the wonders of the human race is that we seem to have been given such a diverse range of abilities. There is nothing better for me than watching someone who is really excellent at something; anything from cooking to parenting to driving a car well, seeing them enjoying being excellent at what they do. That is where Aristotle says you are getting nearest to God because this is what animals can’t do. Animals are driven by their instincts.

Aristotle invented the idea of the “Hive Mind,” which is why he thought democracy was the best system. He said it’s like a public feast where everybody brought the dish they were best at. He said that’s what an ideal society should be. I think it is miraculous what diverse things excite people. I genuinely get excited by going to a library and reading some old Greek book. Weird, isn’t it? But I do. I’m very lucky that I get to do that for money. Getting to do what you’re really good at is the happiest you can possibly be as a human.

Janae Jean serves as editor, social media manager, recipe columnist and podcaster for Conscious Community Magazine. Visit www.janaejean.com or www.perennialmusicandarts.com for details about her other projects.

Spencer Schluter serves as an advertising account manager, social media manager and podcaster for Conscious Community Magazine. Visit www.yggstudios.com for more about his freelance design and consulting work. He is also a master level Reiki and traditional Chinese Qigong practitioner.

Jun 03 2019 · 51mins

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Exoteric Advice: Edith Hall & Helen Rosner

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What might 4th century BC philosopher Aristotle and 20th century celebrity chef Julia Child have to say to each other and to us? We’re in dialogue with renowned classicist Edith Hall, author of Aristotle's Way, and The New Yorker’s James Beard Award-winning roving food correspondent Helen Rosner on how ancient wisdom, practical advice, and a decided lack of elitism are key ingredients for eating and living well. Plus, a dash of good taste (and advice) in books our staff live by.

May 12 2019 · 52mins
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#367: Edith Hall

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Professor Edith Hall discusses how Aristotle and philosophy can be useful guides for leading a good life. You will not want to miss her description of eudaemonia and her insight on what the implication could be for building healthy society.

Edith's book, Aristotle's Way: How Ancient Wisdom Can Change Your Life, is available now.
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Feb 26 2019 · 49mins
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Edith Hall

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Professor Edith Hall discusses how Aristotle and philosophy can be useful guides for leading a good life. You will not want to miss her description of eudaemonia and her insight on what the implication could be for building healthy society.

Edith's book, Aristotle's Way: How Ancient Wisdom Can Change Your Life, is available now.
Select: drdrew.com/select and use code drdrew
P3-OM: Visit p3om.com/drew and use the coupon code "drew" for 20% off
TrueCar: Visit TrueCar to enjoy a more confident car-buying experience
Feb 26 2019 · 51mins
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179. Edith Hall (classicist) – from Aristotle to Oprah and back again: how to live your best life

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We’ve been talking a lot lately on this show about happiness. What it is, where we can get more of it, why it does not yet seem to be available on the Internet. Author Ruth Whippman presented some compelling evidence that the way most Americans are pursuing happiness is making us unhappier. Buddhist master teacher Joseph Goldstein talked about a way of training yourself to be more generous, and the happiness this has brought to his life.

In her new book ARISTOTLE’S WAY, classicist Edith Hall reminds us that Aristotle’s “virtue ethics” was a sophisticated, subtle approach to the pursuit of lifelong happiness a couple millennia before Oprah thought of inviting us to live our best life. Offering no listicles of the top ten happiness hacks, Aristotle tried to live and taught the virtues of an ethically guided, purpose driven life with plenty of room for good friends, sensual pleasures, and long walks on the beaches of Ancient Greece, Macedonia, and what is now Turkey. 

Edith Hall—my guest today—enjoys putting the pleasure as well as the rigor into all aspects of Ancient Greek and Roman History, society, and thought. She’s a professor of Classics at King’s College, London, the author of more than 20 books, and a world leader in the study of ancient theatre and culture.

Surprise conversation starter clips in this episode:

Nick Offerman on what happiness is

Stephen Greenblatt on the Adam and Eve story

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jan 26 2019 · 59mins
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Episode 145: Aristotle's Way: How Ancient Wisdom Can Change Your Life, with Edith Hall

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My guest is Edith Hall. Her newest book is Aristotle's Way: How Ancient Wisdom Can Change Your Life. In expert yet vibrant modern language, Hall lays out the crux of Aristotle's thinking, mixing affecting autobiographical anecdotes with a deep wealth of classical learning. For Hall, whose own life has been greatly improved by her understanding of Aristotle, this is an intensely personal subject. She distills his ancient wisdom into ten practical and universal lessons to help us confront life's difficult and crucial moments, summarizing a lifetime of the most rarefied and brilliant scholarship.

Aristotle was the first philosopher to inquire into subjective happiness, and he understood its essence better and more clearly than anyone since. According to Aristotle, happiness is not about well-being, but instead a lasting state of contentment, which should be the ultimate goal of human life. We become happy through finding a purpose, realizing our potential, and modifying our behavior to become the best version of ourselves. With these objectives in mind, Aristotle developed a humane program for becoming a happy person, which has stood the test of time, comprising much of what today we associate with the good life: meaning, creativity, and positivity. Most importantly, Aristotle understood happiness as available to the vast majority us, but only, crucially, if we decide to apply ourselves to its creation--and he led by example. As Hall writes, "If you believe that the goal of human life is to maximize happiness, then you are a budding Aristotelian."

Special Guest: Edith Hall.

Jan 16 2019 · 1hr 5mins
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12 The Comedy of Democracy w/ Edith Hall (Aristophanes)

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World-renowned classicist Edith Hall joins us to discuss the relation between entertainment and politics in ancient Athens, particularly on the comic stage. Theatrical comedy, which was invented in Athens after the city's democratic revolution, was at first highly political. Comedy plays, put on publicly in the huge outdoor theater of Dionysus, often directly attacked prominent individuals in the city (who were usually in the audience). As mentioned in episode 8, Socrates was often parodied in the theater. Politicians like Pericles and Cleon were also periodically humiliated on the comic stage. No one was safe from ridicule. Moreover, playwrights did not hesitate to use scatological humor, sexual profanity, and lots of fart jokes in their satires of anyone and everything. 

Joining us to help give us a clearer view of the Athenian comic stage is Edith Hall, prolific author and professor of classics at King's College, London. We explore what it was like to see comedies in the Athenian theater and what the surviving plays can tell us about the role of political satire in a democratic society. For additional information on Greek comedy as well as our guest, visit the webpage for this episode at greecepodcast.com/12

Today marks the one year anniversary of this podcast. Thank you all so much for listening! In the spirit of Athenian comedy, we conclude today's episode on a festive note, ending with a very funny song from our friend Doug Metzger over at the Literature and History podcast. If you aren't already listening to that show, you should check it out! There's nothing else like it in the podcast world for ancient Greek literature.

Sep 21 2017 · 49mins
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