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Steve Klabnik

26 Podcast Episodes

Latest 7 Oct 2022 | Updated Daily

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FLOSS Weekly 618: Rust - Steve Klabnik & Rust

FLOSS Weekly (Audio)

Steve Klabnik joins Doc Searls and Shawn Powers to talk about Rust. Rust, which was started at Mozilla, has grown to become one of the world's most relied-upon and fastest growing programming languages. Klabnik literally wrote the book on Rust. In the show, he visits how it differs from C++ and other alternatives, some of the many ways it is used, the large and familiar names (e.g. DropBox) that depend on it, the community culture around it, how open source and free software work are changing as we move toward a post-COVID world. Hosts: Doc Searls and Shawn Powers Guest: Steve Klabnik Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/floss-weekly Think your open source project should be on FLOSS Weekly? Email floss@twit.tv. Thanks to Lullabot's Jeff Robbins, web designer and musician, for our theme music. Sponsor: Melissa.com/twit

1hr 3mins

24 Feb 2021

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FLOSS Weekly 618: Rust - Steve Klabnik & Rust

FLOSS Weekly (Video)

Steve Klabnik joins Doc Searls and Shawn Powers to talk about Rust. Rust, which was started at Mozilla, has grown to become one of the world's most relied-upon and fastest growing programming languages. Klabnik literally wrote the book on Rust. In the show, he visits how it differs from C++ and other alternatives, some of the many ways it is used, the large and familiar names (e.g. DropBox) that depend on it, the community culture around it, how open source and free software work are changing as we move toward a post-COVID world. Hosts: Doc Searls and Shawn Powers Guest: Steve Klabnik Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/floss-weekly Think your open source project should be on FLOSS Weekly? Email floss@twit.tv. Thanks to Lullabot's Jeff Robbins, web designer and musician, for our theme music. Sponsor: Melissa.com/twit

1hr 3mins

24 Feb 2021

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The State of Rust - Steve Klabnik

The Virtual World

Hey, folks. Welcome back to the Virtual World. Join me as I sit down with Steve Klabnik and discuss the state of the Rust programming language and ecosystem.--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-virtual-world/message

48mins

30 Jul 2020

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Kodsnack 324 - Any error message that's confusing is a bug, with Steve Klabnik

Kodsnack in English

Recorded at Øredev 2018, Fredrik talks to Steve Klabnik about Rust and Webassembly. We talk a lot about error messages, based on Steve’s talk on how Rust handles and displays error messages. We discuss Rust’s error messages thinking an handling, but also error messages more in general, such how to think in order to produce error messages both developers and end users have a chance of understanding. Steve explains how and why the Rust compiler is switching from a pass-based compilation approach to a query-based approach to better facilitate partial recompilation upon smaller code changes. We also talk about Rust 2018, how Rust puts out new releases and what major features are on their way. We then switch to talking about Webassembly. We discuss how Webassembly is moving along, among other things how it is getting better at playing well with others, enabling people to rely on Webassembly code without necessarily even needing to know about it. Thank you Cloudnet for sponsoring our VPS! Comments, questions or tips? We are @kodsnack, @tobiashieta, @oferlund and @bjoreman on Twitter, have a page on Facebook and can be emailed at info@kodsnack.se if you want to write longer. We read everything we receive. If you enjoy Kodsnack we would love a review in iTunes! You can also support the podcast by buying us a coffee (or two!) through Ko-fi. Links Steve Klabnik Steve was also in episode 245, talking about Rust, why the lucky stiff and a lot more Mozilla Rust Steve’s presentation about error messages in Rust Steve’s second presentation, about Webassembly Rust’s Github label for diagnostics/confusing error messages ICE - internal compiler error AST - abstract syntax tree IR - intermediate representation Linkchecker The Rust book Rust by example Async/await for Rust Webassembly Emscripten Wasmpack - bundles Webassembly code as a npm package - and puts it on npm Spectre and Meltdown The host bindings proposal The DOM Wasm-bindgen Polyfill Ethereum’s work with Webassembly SIMD - Single instruction multiple data SIMD-support in Webassembly webassembly.org The Webassembly spec C and C++ through Emscripten Blazor - C# to Webassembly Yes, there was a talk about Blazor by Steve Sanderson Spidermonkey - Mozilla’s Javascript engine Titles Something that should not be an afterthought Hard actual work What messages to give or how to give them Any error message that’s confusing is a bug Git blame always returns your own name The internal deadline is tomorrow The harder problem The real test of being usable More useful to more people Broader than just the DOM A host can do these things The design is sort of not there We need more teachers and explainers

31mins

6 Aug 2019

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Edge Storage with Steve Klabnik

Software Daily

Edge computing allows for faster data access and computation. When your client application makes a request, that request might be routed to the edge. Edge servers are more numerous and more widely distributed than normal data centers, but an edge server might not have all of the data or the complete application logic for the backend to serve your request.Edge servers have historically been used for content delivery networks (CDN). CDNs are useful for hosting and serving media files that might otherwise be slow to access over a network. More recently, applications are also using edge servers for computation, as well as storage of resources which are smaller than the movies, music, and images that have traditionally been stored on an edge server.Steve Klabnik is an engineer with Cloudflare, and he returns to the show to discuss storage at the edge. In Steve’s previous appearances we have explored Rust and WebAssembly, and we also touch on those topics in today’s episode.

8 Jul 2019

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Edge Storage with Steve Klabnik

JavaScript – Software Engineering Daily

Edge computing allows for faster data access and computation. When your client application makes a request, that request might be routed to the edge. Edge servers are more numerous and more widely distributed than normal data centers, but an edge server might not have all of the data or the complete application logic for the backend to serve your request. Edge servers have historically been used for content delivery networks (CDN). CDNs are useful for hosting and serving media files that might otherwise be slow to access over a network. More recently, applications are also using edge servers for computation, as well as storage of resources which are smaller than the movies, music, and images that have traditionally been stored on an edge server. Steve Klabnik is an engineer with Cloudflare, and he returns to the show to discuss storage at the edge. In Steve’s previous appearances we have explored Rust and WebAssembly, and we also touch on those topics in today’s episode. ANNOUNCEMENTS FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. FindCollabs is the company I am building, and we are having an online hackathon with $2500 in prizes. If you are working on a project, or you are looking for other programmers to build a project or start a company with, check out FindCollabs. I’ve been interviewing people from some of these projects on the FindCollabs podcast, so if you want to learn more about the community you can hear that podcast. New Software Daily app for iOS. It includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. You can comment on episodes and have discussions with other members of the community. And you can become a paid subscriber for ad free episodes at softwareengineeringdaily.com/subscribe. Altalogy is the company who has been developing much of the software for the newest app, and if you are looking for a company to help you with your mobile and web development, I recommend checking them out. Upcoming conferences I’m attending: Datadog Dash July 16th and 17th in NYC, Open Core Summit September 19th and 20th in San Francisco. We are hiring two interns for software engineering and business development! If you are interested in either position, send an email with your resume to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com with “Internship” in the subject line. The post Edge Storage with Steve Klabnik appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

48mins

8 Jul 2019

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Open Source Maintainer Steve Klabnik

devpath.fm

Steve Klabnik is an accomplished open source maintainer having worked on a huge number of projects. He is most well known for his work on Ruby, Rails, and Rust. During our interview, we talk about Steve's journey as a developer and the how open source has shaped his career. Steve's internet home: https://twitter.com/steveklabnik

40mins

22 Feb 2019

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WebAssembly Future with Steve Klabnik

JavaScript – Software Engineering Daily

WebAssembly is a low-level compilation target for any programming language that can be interpreted into WebAssembly. Alternatively, WebAssembly is a way to run languages other than JavaScript in the browser. Or, yet another way of describing WebAssembly is a virtual machine for executing code in a low level, well-defined sandbox. WebAssembly is reshaping what is possible to do in the web browser. A developer can write a program in Rust or C++, compile it down into a WebAssembly module, and call out to that module via JavaScript. This is very useful for running memory-sensitive workloads in the browser—such as 3-D games. But WebAssembly is also useful for running modules outside of the browser. Why is that important? If you can already run C++ or Rust code outside of the browser by executing the program from the command line, why would you want to put the code into a WebAssembly module before executing it? One answer is security. WebAssembly modules have well-defined semantics for what memory they can access. WebAssembly could provide more reliable sandboxing for untrusted code. Steve Klabnik is a software engineer at Mozilla, and he joins the show today to play the role of a WebAssembly futurist. We revisit the basics of WebAssembly and the current state of the technology. Steve talks Steve also describes the lessons of past web technologies such as Flash—and what they did right and wrong. We also explore the current and future applications of WebAssembly, which we will talk about in more detail in tomorrow’s episode. The post WebAssembly Future with Steve Klabnik appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

54mins

17 Aug 2018

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Episode 43: Rubyists in Other Languages with James Edward Gray II and Steve Klabnik

Tech Done Right

Rubyists in Other Languages with James Edward Gray II and Steve Klabnik TableXI is offering training for developers and product teams! For more info, email workshops@tablexi.com. Guests Steve Klabnik: Blog James Edward Gray II: Blog Summary Ruby is great. But it's not the best tool for everything. On this episode, I talk to James Edward Gray II and Steve Klabnik. Both James and Steve have made substantial contributions to the Ruby and Rails community, and they now both spend lots of time using other languages. We talk about what makes Rust and Elixir interesting for Ruby developers to learn, what some other interesting languages might be. Notes 01:48 - Moving Towards Other Programming Languages from Ruby: Why? 03:39 - Rust The Rust Programming Language The Elm Programming Language The Rust Programming Language (Book) by Steve Klabnik 17:54 - Other Cool Programming Languages for Rubyists Scratch Logo GameSalad GameMaker Studio 2 Prograph Abstract Syntax Tree 29:22 - Elixir The Elixir Programming Language Erlang Prolog Pattern Matching Related Episodes Programming Languages and Communication With Kerri Miller React Native with Gant Laborde, Ed LaFoy, and Brent Vatne Ruby Tapas and Avoiding Code with Avdi Grimm The Elm Programming Language With Corey Haines Special Guests: James Edward Gray II and Steve Klabnik.

48mins

8 Aug 2018

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Bonus Episode: Steve Klabnik on Concurrency and Rust

Code Podcast

Show notes: https://codepodcast.com/posts/2018-07-19-steve-klabnik-rust-concurrency/Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/codepodcastThis is the unabridged interview with Steve Klabnik that we originally did for the episode on concurrency in Jan 2016. Steve together with Carol Nichols just released a new book "The Rust Programming Language", so we decided to revisit the early stuff :)Music by @Mid_Air

40mins

19 Jul 2018

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