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Amy Wan

37 Podcast Episodes

Latest 21 May 2022 | Updated Daily

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013: Investor and Sponsor Syndication Dynamics with Amy Wan

Passive Income Unlocked

Title: Investor and Sponsor Syndication Dynamics with Amy Wan Amy Wan is the Founder & CEO of Bootstrap Legal, which automates real estate syndication legal documents, and a Partner at Sosnow & Associated, a securities law firm. She hosts The Law and Blockchain Podcast and has authored the Bloomberg Law practice guide to ICOs and Lexis Nexus' Private Equity practice guide. Previously, she was a Partner at a boutique securities law firm and General Counsel at a real estate crowdfunding platform. Amy founded Legal Hackers LA, which programs around the intersection of law and technology; was named one of ten women to watch in legal technology by the American Bar Association Journal in 2014 and one of 18 millennials changing legaltech by law.com in 2018; and was nominated as a Finalist for the Corporate Counsel of the Year Award 2015 by LA Business Journal. Amy has also worked in international regulatory and trade policy at the U.S. Department of Commerce, and was a Presidential Management Fellow at the U.S. Department of State and U.S. Department of Transportation. She holds an LL.M. in Public International Law from the London School of Economics and Political Science, a JD from the University of Southern California Gould School of Law, and a BA in Biological Sciences from the University of Southern California. Let’s tune in to her story! [00:01 - 05:00] Opening Segment Get to know my guest Amy Wan Amy Wan talks about her life and career  Having to end her international career Finding her way to beginning Bootstrap Legal [05:02 - 10:26] Securing Your Real Estate Syndications Regulatory requirements in real estate syndications Exemptions in registering an offering Wolf 506 B under regulation D Rule 506 C What you should know before investing in a deal [10:27 - 22:29] Investor and Sponsor Syndication Dynamics The Waterfall Structure Fully understanding what you’re getting The different waterfall structures Refinancing and paying back investors  Amy talks all about fees Standard fees in real estate syndications Legal ownerships in a company, Class B and Class A ownerships [22:30 - 24:31] Closing Segment Final words Connect with my guest, Amy in the links below Tweetable Quotes “It’s not uncommon in the industry for sponsors to get sued by their own investors.” - Amy Wan “Always be sure to ask your sponsor.” - Amy Wan “People should be looking at government provisions to fully understand what their rights are when things go south.” - Amy Wan ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Reach Amy through amy@blingfi.com and LinkedIn Check out her website: https://www.bootstraplegal.com/ WANT TO LEARN MORE? Connect with me through LinkedIn Or send me an email sujata@luxe-cap.com Visit my website www.luxe-cap.com or my Youtube channel Thanks for tuning in!   If you liked my show, LEAVE A 5-STAR REVIEW, like, and subscribe!  

24mins

6 Sep 2021

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Amy Wan - Syndications From the Legal Perspective

My Core Intentions

Timeline: [02:10] An introduction to today's guest, Amy Wan with 'Bootstrap Legal', as she focuses on the basic legal aspects of Real Estate Syndication. [03:51] Explain in one word what really drives you who you are personally and professionally. [04:22] Amy describes her journey to where she is today, personally and professionally. [08:41] Where does 'Blue Sky Law' or a 'Non-registered Security' come into play? [11:00] Amy explains certain concepts involved in the legal aspects of Real Estate Syndication: PPM, Subscription Agreement, Operating Agreement, Limited Partner Agreement. [14:16] What kind of questions should a new syndicator be asking an attorney to make sure that the attorney is qualified to help them? [15:50]What should investors and syndicators know in the marketplaces they're walking to? [18:57] How do you go about making high stake decisions? [23:00] What should investors be looking for in the market today? [25:52] What do you know today that you wish you would have known at the beginning of your career? [26:48] Amy shares an insider tip. [28:59] The best book you've ever read? "The Hard Thing About Hard Things" - by Ben Horowitz [30:04] How to contact Amy Website - bootstraplegal.com Email - amy@bootstraplegal.coma

30mins

2 Mar 2021

Similar People

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SK077 - Setup Multifamily Syndication House Legally Using SEC Lawyer w/ Amy Wan

Premium Cashflow Podcast

Amy Wan is Founder & CEO of Bootstrap Legal, which automates real estate syndication legal documents, and co-founder and CEO of Sagewise, a legaltech blockchain company. She hosts The Law and Blockchain Podcast (a show on The Bitcoin Podcast Network) and has authored the Bloomberg Law practice guide to ICOs and Lexis Nexus' Private Equity practice guide. Previously, she was a Partner at a boutique securities law firm and General Counsel at a real estate crowdfunding platform. Amy founded Legal Hackers LA, which programs around the intersection of law and technology; was named one of ten women to watch in legal technology by the American Bar Association Journal in 2014 and one of 18 millennials changing legaltech by law.com in 2018; and was nominated as a Finalist for the Corporate Counsel of the Year Award 2015 by LA Business Journal.Amy has also worked in international regulatory and trade policy at the U.S. Department of Commerce, and was a Presidential Management Fellow at the U.S. Department of State and U.S. Department of Transportation. She holds an LL.M. in Public International Law from the London School of Economics and Political Science, a JD from the University of Southern California Gould School of Law, and a BA in Biological Sciences from the University of Southern California.

38mins

30 Sep 2020

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CSC 28 Amy Wan: Challenging Self and Testing Limits in Support of Multifamily Real Estate Investors

Creek Side Chats With Successful Real Estate Investors

Amy Wan is Founder & CEO of Bootstrap Legal, which uses artificial intelligence to help draft real estate syndication legal documents faster and cheaper. She has authored Lexis Nexus’ Private Equity practice guide. Previously, she was a Partner at a boutique securities law firm and General Counsel at a real estate crowdfunding platform. Amy is also the founder and co-organizer of Legal Hackers LA, which programs around the intersection of law and technology; was named one of ten women to watch in legal technology by the American Bar Association Journal in 2014 and one of 18 millennials changing legaltech by law.com in 2018; and was nominated as a Finalist for the Corporate Counsel of the Year Award 2015 by LA Business Journal. Amy has also worked in international regulatory and trade policy at the U.S. Department of Commerce, and was a Presidential Management Fellow at the U.S. Department of State and U.S. Department of Transportation. She holds an LL.M. in Public International Law from the London School of Economics and Political Science, a JD from the University of Southern California Gould School of Law, and a BA in Biological Sciences from the University of Southern California. Connect with Amy Website: https://www.bootstraplegal.com Website: https://jobsactlawyers.com/ All the social media: Bootstrap Legal ___________________________________ Want to appear on our podcast?  Contact Us Learn how you can passively put your hard earned money to work for you through multifamily syndication:  Steed Talker Capital Connect with Us: Facebook Twitter Linkedin Instagram Youtube

27mins

7 Jul 2020

Most Popular

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Resolve Your Legal Issues in Real Estate Sector With AMY WAN

Syndication Made Easy with Vinney (Smile) Chopra

Welcome to the Syndication Made Easy with Vinney Chopra show everybody! Today we are with Amy Wan, the founder, and CEO of Bootstrap Legal. Our topic for this conversation is Amy will be sharing her expertise and how to avoid some pretty serious legal troubles through oversights and non-disclosures. Learn the essentials and also hear some great, specific details in the Q&A following the presentation. As you enter a deal, it is vital to know the standard fees that are customary to charge to get compensation. It is essential to hire a syndication attorney to assist with the legal matters of real estate investments. Amy Wan breaks down the fees every realtor and investor should be aware of prior to making and closing deals. A well-known legal expert, Amy reveals the charges sponsors usually advance personally, the three most common ways to structure your investor distributions, and the real estate waterfall method. On the side, she gives away the things you have to take note of before taking money from investors. Topics discussed - 1. Don’t pay someone to raise money for you 2. Transaction attorney 3. Enforcement attorney 4. Securities attorney 5. Local real estate attorney 6. SEC investigation 7. Syndications 8. Raising capital 9. Fund of funds 10. Changes from Covid – 19 Vinney agrees with Amy Wan as we all love our privacy, So there is an importance of Privacy Laws. It was a pleasure to interview attorney @AmyWan of BootStrap Legal to discuss Navigating the Securities Law and Capital Fund Raising. It was fun and I learned a lot! Enjoy. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Get your copy of Vinney’s #1 International Best Selling book – Syndication Made Easy – https://amzn.to/2kwjHDN -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ☑️ Check out Mr. Vinney Smile Chopra at 🎓 Learn From Vinney: https://vinneychopra.com/academy 🌐 Invest Passively in Real Estate Syndications With Vinney: https://moneilinvest.com/sign-up 🌐 Invest Passively in Senior Housing: https://seniorlivinginvesting.co/invest 📚 Access my E-books: 🌐 Real Estate Syndication Free Guide: https://vinneychopra.com/ebooks 🌐 Senior Living Investing Free Guide: https://seniorlivinginvesting.co/ebook 👍 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/VinneyChopra 📸 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/vinneychopra 🌐 LinkedIn: https://bit.ly/2Y9kdaU 🐦 Twitter: https://twitter.com/smilingvinney 📹 YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/vinneychopra -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 🤝 Meet Me (For 15 mins or 60 mins): https://bit.ly/2Yd4V4F --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 📹 More Free Apartment Training Videos 🌐 https://bit.ly/2MAXGOP ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 📚 Syndication Made Easy with Vinney (Smile) Chopra 📌 https://apple.co/2XyB0EV --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 🔔 Subscribe My Channel and Press the Bell Icon 🔔 📺 https://www.youtube.com/vinneychopra ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 📞 Contact Me: 🌐 https://vinneychopra.com/contact-vinney/ 📧 vinney@vinneychopra.com #vinneychopra #amywan #RealEstateInvesting #ApartmentSyndication #propertymanagement #passiveincome #cashflow #multifamilyinvesting #apartmentinvesting #investor #multifamily #vinneymultifamily #moneil #moneilinvest #realestate #guidetosuccess #success #motivation #syndication #realestateinvesting #goals

39mins

15 Jun 2020

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88. Automating Syndication Legal Docs & the Legalities of Raising Capital as a Business with Amy Wan

Tax Smart Real Estate Investors Podcast

In this episode, we're joined by Amy Wan, founder and CEO of Bootstrap Legal, a company that automates real estate syndication legal documents. She's also co-founder and CEO of Sagewise, a legal blockchain company, and co-host of The Law and Blockchain Podcast.Today we discuss how Bootstrap Legal automates and streamlines the creation of PPMs, subscription agreements, and other documents involved in the syndication process, when to get your CPA involved to review docs, the legalities of raising capital as a business, how setting expectations is a key to success, and much more.Learn more about Amy and her work: https://www.bootstraplegal.com/Join our Facebook group, the one-stop-shop for real estate investors to learn about tax strategy and stay up to date on changing tax laws:www.facebook.com/groups/taxsmartinvestorsFor an initial consultation from Hall CPA, PLLC visit www.therealestatecpa.com/become-clientSubscribe to our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/c/therealestatecpaThe Tax Smart Real Estate Investors podcast is for general information purposes only and is not intended to provide, and should not be relied on for, tax, legal, or accounting advice. Information on the podcast may not constitute the most up-to-date legal or other information. No reader, user, or listener of this podcast should act or refrain from acting on the basis of information on this podcast without first seeking legal and tax advice from counsel in the relevant jurisdiction. Only your individual attorney and tax advisor can provide assurances that the information contained herein – and your interpretation of it – is applicable or appropriate to your particular situation. Use of, and access to, this podcast or any of the links or resources contained or mentioned within the podcast show and show notes do not create a relationship between the reader, user, or listener and podcast hosts, contributors, or guests.Always consult your own tax, legal, and accounting advisors before engaging in any transaction.

35mins

25 Feb 2020

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Best Of PLP-066 – Private Lending & the SEC with Attorney Amy Wan

The Private Lender Podcast

Not all are mindful of the laws that go along with private lending since some lenders base their transaction on relationships and trust. Although it all boils down to trust, being well-informed of the legal aspects of private lending will not harm anyone. In today’s time, there is a practical reality that people trying to raise a small amount of capital have limited ability to be compliant with securities laws, and this is what Attorney Amy Wan delves into. Founder and CEO of Bootstrap Legal, Amy breaks down the types of rules, regulations, and securities in private lending. As she explains when an investment loan becomes security, Amy reveals that lenders are much less regulated when you lend your own money to another investor. She goes in-depth on the event when you need to have a license when making loans, the legal documents required with investors, the process she does that make legal matters and paperwork less stressful to clients, and how she has brought digital and legal to smaller investors. On the side, she shares details about her podcast show, Law and Blockchain. — Listen to the podcast here: Private Lending And The SEC with Attorney Amy Wan Syndicating, Private Lending And SEC Compliance I’d like to welcome you to this episode. I’m very grateful to have the pleasure of speaking with an attorney who happens to specialize in helping investors handling the paperwork and the filings required by the SEC, Securities Exchange Commission. My guest, Amy Wan, has an impressive resume to say the least. She lives on the leading edge of the financial and legal tech world and was named one of the Ten Women to Watch in Legal Tech by the ABA Journal, that’s the American Bar Association. I’m honored and grateful to have her on the show. I have a new slogan that I actually put on a Private Lender Podcast t-shirt. The back says, “Never trust, always verify.” Nonetheless, never trust, always verify is a perfect segue into an interview with an SEC attorney. Let’s go ahead and get down to the brass tacks and let’s get to the interview with Amy Wan. — I’ve got a special treat for you. Our guest is Amy Wan, Founder and CEO of Bootstrap Legal. I am excited to have her on the show. Amy, welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. Thank you for coming out and being interviewed. You deal in an area of expertise of the law that’s beyond my scope of understanding. You’re bringing it down to where people like me can participate, and I definitely want to get into that part of it. I promise we’ll keep this about 30,000 feet as much as possible and we’ll drill down when we need to because I know the law. You can go down some rabbit holes. Tell us a little bit about yourself and how you became the securities and syndication guru that you are. I actually started my career in the federal government. We were doing interesting things in DC, international trade and international regulatory affairs. When I moved back to LA, there’s not much of an international trade law industry out in LA except for import-export compliance paperwork which was very different from negotiating free trade agreements. I started over. I became general counsel of an early stage real estate crowdfunding platform at that time. The interesting thing about that crowdfunding platform is that I had to deal with two different areas of law, one on the real estate lending side and then one on the actual security side. We did private lending. We would make hard money, private money loans to folks flipping houses and then we would fractionalize those loans and turn it into a security and sell it to accredited investors through our marketplace. I spent a couple of years there and I learned the ins and outs of both of those different sides of the industry. I went on to become a partner at a boutique law firm that focused pretty much exclusively on a real estate syndication, more so the equity side and then it got interesting. I got to a point in my practice where I was spending every day writing the same fund documents over and over again. I thought this is inefficient. I befriended someone who was beginning in the syndication industry at the time. He’s now a large real estate syndication influencer. Back then, he came to me and said, “I want to raise $300,000 through syndication. How much will it cost?” I told him, “I’ll tell you the price. I know you’re not going to use me because the transaction cost doesn’t make sense.” Sure enough, I told him the price. He fled the other direction and I thought, “This is interesting. Folks trying to raise a small amount of capital have very limited ability to actually be compliant with securities laws.” The SEC doesn’t care about that. I had dinner with a couple of folks from the SEC. I brought this up to them and they were like, “You still have to follow all of the securities laws anyway. I’m like, “I get that, but there’s this practical reality.” Given that I had worked at a tech startup, I thought I could do better. I whipped up some software. It’s like the TurboTax of real estate syndication and it actually automates the first draft of a lot of the paperwork that you need to sell a security. For me as an attorney, it’s great because I cut off twenty hours off of drafting, but it’s great for my clients because I can get them the documents faster. My prices tend to be a little bit lower because I’m so much more efficient. I’m not one of those attorneys who bills by the hour. I do flat fees and it makes so much more sense. I heard you first on Kevin Bupp’s podcast a while ago. I was commuting to work and I was thinking, “I’ve got to get Amy on to talk about this. A lot of our audience will call or email and they’ll talk about the security side of things, the SEC and what investors or borrowers would have to do.” As I understand is that they issue the certificates or they issue the security. The SEC is concerned with them. On the private lending side, what type of rules and regulations do we have? I’ll back it up. Let’s look at it from, “I’m going to make a loan on the single-family house versus my best friend is going to get into an apartment complex and he’s syndicating twenty people together to get the equity stake so that we can go get the funds.” From a federal perspective, how do the investors and the lenders look? When it comes to lending law itself, although there are some federal regulations and laws around lending generally, most of those are in the consumer context. When it comes to private money, a lot of this is done from a state regulation perspective. When you get into state lending laws, it varies state by state. Some states require you to have a license to do this. Some states don’t care. Some states, for example California, you can make a small number of loans and then after you reached that limit, then you have to have that license. There are different types of licenses you need. It’s all over the map. Generally, there are a couple of things that folks should keep in mind. One of these things is usury rates. A loan that is usurious is when you’re charging too much for interest. Every state has a different usury rate. You generally do not want to go over it because the states and the regulators do not take kindly upon that, although in this market, it’s not much of a problem because the rates are significantly lower than they were a couple of years ago. Usury is one. Another thing to keep in mind is securities. If it’s one person lending to another person, that’s usually fine. When it’s multiple people banding together to lend to one person or even multiple people, then we have to think about a different set of laws. That’s securities laws. At the end of the day, it all comes down to trust.Click To Tweet The last thing is it depends on what you’re lending on. If we’re talking about single-family residential, lending to owner-occupied is different from lending to non-owner occupied. When it’s non-owner occupied, generally you’re lending to some LLC. There is a business entity. They’re a business bank account. The person is not supposed to live in it. There is a language in the actual loan documents that say, “This is a business purpose loan. I won’t use any of this for personal or household expenses.” Contrast that with when you’re lending in the owner-occupied context, suddenly that becomes a consumer loan. It’s not a commercial loan and that is very heavily regulated. I do a lot of loans to people who do seller financing. It’s Dodd-Frank. There are lots of hoops we go through. We have it originated and there’s the test to make sure that that person can pay the mortgage and you’re not dodging them. You said it perfectly, once it becomes a consumer loan, then the regulators and the judges are not going to look favorably upon you. I don’t care if it is out of your Roth IRA. If you’re doing something wrong, they’re going to get you. Not only that, it’s not just a whole different set of rules, but a different philosophy or mentality applies. If you’re lending to non-owner occupied, people are like, “It’s a business loan. It’s all for business.” You’re presumed to be sophisticated and all that stuff. When you’re doing a consumer loan and you end up going to court or something like that, then suddenly it’s not like, “A business loan deal went south.” It is, “You’re kicking someone out of their home.” It’s suddenly a much bigger deal. The states where they tend to be blue states or places where it’s a large metropolitan area, the judges in those jurisdictions are going to scrutinize this a lot more in favor of the borrower than the lenders. Be aware of all of that. I tell people who want to be private lenders is to don’t go owner-occupied, not until you get a lot of experience and you get a legal team built behind you that can handle all this for you. The lawyers are there for their help. They’re there to keep us compliant and also to say, “I see you put this language in here, this can happen,” or “This is your worst-case scenario. Why don’t you try this?” It’s funny you mentioned usury laws because Quincy Long at Quest IRA always says, “What’s a little usury amongst friends? We all know each other here.” The way I understand it is there are no usury police out there. However, in Texas, 18% is our usury law. Let’s say I make a loan for 20% and I anger that borrower somehow, in some way. That borrower can go to court, take it to a judge and the judge says, “This is a usurious contract. It’s null and void and you don’t even have to pay that guy back his money.” It’s not exactly the same, but I liken it to landlord-tenant law. There are many places where just because the tenant complains, everyone bends over backward for a tenant as opposed to the landlord. It sucks, it’s business and you don’t want to be in that situation. From a securities perspective on the federal level, everyone’s got to check your own state. It would be worthwhile saying we’re not offering to sell any securities or anything like that. This does not constitute an attorney-client contract with you or anybody else. From the federal level, as long as a lender is making it person to person, it’s a business loan from me to a real estate investor to do a flip or a landlord wants to hold it for three years or whatever. There’s very little regulation on that. There may be some. Check with your state. From the federal level, the SEC, they’re pretty cool with it. The SEC doesn’t deal with this whole lot, except to the extent that you get multiple investors involved. This tends to be on a very state level and it tends to be a very commercial discussion. The other big issue is licensing. Do you need a license to be making these loans, to be brokering them? That’s a state by state discussion. In most states, for non-owner occupied lending, you usually don’t need a license. There’s a handful of states where you do. There are several states that offer several different types of licensure. You could be a regular real estate broker, you can be a mortgage broker, you can be a loan broker or things of that sort. It’s a state by state discussion. I do actually like that. The feds are like, “We’re going to make sure that you’re not taking advantage of anybody and then we’ll let everything else fall to the state.” You talked about brokering. I wanted to bring that up because in Texas, we’re a red state, but we’re pretty liberal when it comes to things like oilfields and guns. We’re awesome. We have a very short foreclosure process. I love to lend here. I’ll give you a scenario of maybe something I’ve thought about doing here, or maybe it’s something I’ve done. Let’s say that I find a deal, but I’ve already tapped out all my money out of my self-directed IRA and I don’t have any cash. I negotiate a loan to an investor and then I have somebody else fund it. Can I get a couple of points? Can they get the points off of the loan at closing or would I be considered a broker in the eyes of the feds? The feds don’t care, but your state regulators are going to care. That’s one of those situations where you are going to have to figure out whether you need a loan brokering or a mortgage brokering license from your specific state. We don’t have security in Texas until you get 30 people. It leads me to my next question. I want to get in your expertise because I don’t want to let you go and listen. Let’s say I’m making this step up. I’m going from my single-family. I’m an investor now, not just a private lender, but I want to become an active investor. I’m not going to go run out and sponsor syndication for a 200-unit apartment complex. As someone who is a single-family investor and lender, walk us through. A friend of mine is going to sponsor this deal. He’s putting it all together. He’s getting legal. He’s got his memorandum together and everything. Walk us through what you would suggest I look for as I go through my first syndication. Private Lending: When one person’s making a loan to another person, it is just a straight up loan. When we get ten investors to invest in a fund and make a lot of private loans to flippers, that’s security. The first thing I’ll mention is that notes or debt instruments can be considered a security. When I said when one person’s making a loan to another person, that’s not a security, that’s just a straight up loan. When we get into fancier things where it’s like, “I’m going to get ten investors to invest in a fund which is going to make a lot of private loans to flippers or something like that,” suddenly, that’s security. In terms of what is and is not a security, there’s a very well-defined test on that. It’s called the Howey Test and it’s named after a dude named Howey. It’s a four-part test. What people are looking for to figure out whether or not you’re selling security is generally there’s an investment of money. It’s a common enterprise of people. It’s not one person to one person, but a group of people. The folks who are putting their money in are expecting some profit or possibly a loss. Lastly and very importantly is that it’s based off the efforts of another or a third party. What that means is if you have all active investors, if you have some investor club where everyone says, “We’re all going to source deals together and whoever finds a good deal, we might all invest in it.” That’s not a security because it’s more like an educational group. If it’s something like, “I’m due diligencing all these deals that come in through the pipeline. I’ve determined that this one’s good. I may be putting some of my money in it or I don’t have to, but you guys are all going to invest money. I’m going to organize everything, package it all together and make the loan. I would do all the investor relations, all of that and check foreclosure. You guys don’t have to be involved. I will take care of that. Whatever profits come back, I’m going to distribute them to you.” Instead of an active investor situation, you’ve got a passive investor situation. There’s one person or a couple of people who are part of the sponsoring team where they’re handling the day-to-day operations. All the people who are putting the money in, they are passive. They don’t want to deal with it. They are paying you to deal with it. You’re looking at situations where it’s the doctor that’s investing or the dentist who’s investing. They don’t want to be active investors themselves. They just want to invest money somewhere and then hopefully it makes them money. That’s when we’re talking about securities laws. Securities in the private lending context, it comes in a couple of different forms. The most popular form I see is someone wants to start some fund that makes hard money or private money loans all day long. They

49mins

21 Oct 2019

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WS322: Material Disclosures with Amy Wan

The Real Estate Syndication Show

Welcome back to the Real Estate Syndication Show everybody! Today we are once again joined Amy Wan, the founder, and CEO of Bootstrap Legal. Our topic for this conversation is material disclosures and Amy will be sharing her expertise and how to avoid some pretty serious legal troubles through oversights and non-disclosures.

21mins

8 Sep 2019

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WS319: The Dilemmas of Raising Capital Today with Amy Wan

The Real Estate Syndication Show

On today’s episode, we are joined by returning guest, Amy Wan, to talk about one of the industry’s hottest topics — raising capital and what that looks like when partnering with others. She also provides some insights into how raising capital should be structured and what it should and should not look like.

28mins

5 Sep 2019

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Amy Wan - Pushing Boundaries in Blockchain

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

Amy Wan is a prominent legal tech and block chain attorney and CEO of Sagewise. Constantly pushing and challenging the boundaries of culture, Amy raised a seed round as a pregnant, minority, female block chain founder. It was great to chat to her about her story. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

21mins

19 May 2019

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