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David Head Podcasts

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10 of The Best Podcast Episodes for David Head. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about David Head, often where they are interviewed.

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10 of The Best Podcast Episodes for David Head. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about David Head, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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David Head – A Crisis of Peace

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February 24, 2020 - What if the Revolution sparked in 1776 had collapsed? In this episode, our time machine travels back to the last days of the American Revolution, to track down rumors of an unthinkable plot by the Continental Army to mutiny over lack of pay. Only George Washington stood against the passions of men that may have included such patriots Alexander Hamilton and James Madison?

Infiltrating the plot against the government to see just how far it goes is Professor David Head, who brings us A Crisis of Peace: George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the American Revolution. Professor Head is a history professor at the University of Central Florida whose work has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities and George Washington's Mt. Vernon.

Visit him online at DavidHeadHistory.com, on Facebook at David Head History, or @DavidHeadPhD on Twitter.
Feb 24 2020 · 1hr 9mins
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David Head Interview Episode 2

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In this episode, Matt Crawford speaks to educator and author David Head about his book A Crisis of Peace: George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the American Revolution. This book focuses in on the time between the British surrender at Yorktown and the signing of the Treaty of Paris. What happened between those two dates could have torn this fledgling country asunder. An army bored and unpaid sat disgruntled wondering what their next step should be, this is what led to the Newburgh Conspiracy, a possible military uprising in the making. A phenomenal tale that somehow has not been told before. A great read and quite funny at times thanks to David Head's ease of prose and humor. Enjoy!

Jan 14 2020 · 1hr 2mins
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David Head, "A Crisis of Peace: George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the American Revolution" (Pegasus Books, 2019)

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In March 1783, George Washington confronted a meeting of disgruntled Continental Army officers at their encampment at Newburgh, New York. In his book A Crisis of Peace: George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the American Revolution (Pegasus Books, 2019), David Head explains the background to this meeting and its significance to the larger events of that time. As Head notes, the meeting at Newburgh took place amidst an atmosphere of anticipation of peace with Great Britain. With their service coming to an end, the officers – many of whom were men who anticipated an elevated social status as a result of their service in the Continental Army – feared that the financially strapped Confederation Congress would fail to deliver on their promises of overdue pay and lifetime pensions. With their petitions unheeded, several of them contemplated some sort of action before the army was disbanded. As Head shows, it was Washington’s dramatic appeal to his officers which forestalled such an event, thus ensuring a peaceful resolution to a situation that threatened a very different outcome of the struggle for independence.

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Dec 30 2019 · 56mins
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David Head, "A Crisis of Peace: George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the American Revolution" (Pegasus Books, 2019)

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In March 1783, George Washington confronted a meeting of disgruntled Continental Army officers at their encampment at Newburgh, New York. In his book A Crisis of Peace: George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the American Revolution (Pegasus Books, 2019), David Head explains the background to this meeting and its significance to the larger events of that time. As Head notes, the meeting at Newburgh took place amidst an atmosphere of anticipation of peace with Great Britain. With their service coming to an end, the officers – many of whom were men who anticipated an elevated social status as a result of their service in the Continental Army – feared that the financially strapped Confederation Congress would fail to deliver on their promises of overdue pay and lifetime pensions. With their petitions unheeded, several of them contemplated some sort of action before the army was disbanded. As Head shows, it was Washington’s dramatic appeal to his officers which forestalled such an event, thus ensuring a peaceful resolution to a situation that threatened a very different outcome of the struggle for independence.

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Dec 30 2019 · 56mins
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088 George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the American Revolution with David Head

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In the war’s waning days, the American Revolution neared collapse when Washington’s senior officers were rumored to approach the edge of mutiny.

After the British surrender at Yorktown, the American Revolution blazed on, and as peace was negotiated in Europe, grave problems surfaced at home. The government was broke and paid its debts with loans from France. Political rivalry among the states paralyzed Congress. The army’s officers, encamped near Newburgh, New York, and restless without an enemy to fight, brooded over a civilian population indifferent to their sacrifices.

The result was the Newburgh Conspiracy, a mysterious event in which Continental Army officers, disgruntled by a lack of pay and pensions, may have collaborated with nationalist-minded politicians such as Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and Robert Morris to pressure Congress and the states to approve new taxes and strengthen the central government.

A Crisis of Peace: George Washington, the Newburgh Conspiracy, and the Fate of the American Revolution tells the story of a pivotal episode of General Washington's leadership and reveals how the American Revolution really ended: with fiscal turmoil, political unrest, out-of-control conspiracy thinking, and suspicions between soldiers and civilians so strong that peace almost failed to bring true independence.
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David Head is a history professor at the University of Central Florida in Orlando, whose research has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities and by George Washington's Mt. Vernon. His prior academic books benefited from an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship at the Library Company of Philadelphia and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, a Gilder Lehrman Fellowship at the New-York Historical Society, and a Lord Baltimore Fellowship at the Maryland Historical Society. Head's previous work in the academic community has been honored with several awards and prizes, including Mystic Seaport Museum's John Gardner Maritime Research Award and the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic's Ralph D. Gray Article Prize.
Dec 13 2019 · 1hr 5mins
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031 Pirates and Privateers in the Age of Jackson with David Head

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Privateers of the Americas examines raids on Spanish shipping conducted from the United States during the early 1800s. These activities were sanctioned by and conducted on behalf of, republics in Spanish America aspiring to independence from Spain. Among the available histories of privateering, there is no comparable work. Because privateering further complicated international dealings during the already tumultuous Age of Revolution, the book also offers a new perspective on the diplomatic and Atlantic history of the early American republic.

Seafarers living in the United States secured commissions from Spanish American nations, attacked Spanish vessels, and returned to sell their captured cargoes (which sometimes included slaves) from bases in Baltimore, New Orleans, and Galveston and on Amelia Island. Privateers sold millions of dollars of goods to untold numbers of ordinary Americans. Their collective enterprise involved more than a hundred vessels and thousands of people―not only ships’ crews but investors, merchants, suppliers, and others. They angered foreign diplomats, worried American officials, and muddied U.S. foreign relations.

David Head looks at how Spanish American privateering worked and who engaged in it; how the U.S. government responded; how privateers and their supporters evaded or exploited laws and international relations; what motivated men to choose this line of work; and ultimately, what it meant to them to sail for the new republics of Spanish America. His findings broaden our understanding of the experience of being an American in a wider world.

David Head teaches history at the University of Central Florida in Orlando. His first book, Privateers of the Americas: Spanish American Privateering from the United States, was honored with the John Gardner Maritime Research Award by the Fellows of the G.W. Blunt White Library at Mystic Seaport Museum in Mystic, Connecticut. He received his Ph.D. in history from the University at Buffalo in 2010. In 2016, he was the Amanda and Greg Gregory Family Fellow at the Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon. He is writing his next book on George Washington and the Newburgh Conspiracy.
Jul 20 2018 · 53mins
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David Head, “Privateers of the Americas: Spanish American Privateering from the United States in the Early Republic” (U. Georgia Press, 2015)

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When the nations of Latin America fought for their independence in the early 19th century, they commissioned privateers stationed in the United States to attack Spanish skipping. In Privateers of the Americas: Spanish American Privateering from the United States in the Early Republic (University of Georgia Press, 2015), David Head examines the activities of these privateers within the context of the contemporary Atlantic world. As Head explains, these privateers, most of whom were American citizens, existed in a complex environment of international politics, diplomacy, and economic activity. Operating in violation of U.S. law, they evaded the authorities in a variety of ways, from clandestine operations in the Louisiana bayous to deceptive claims to port authorities in Baltimore. While U.S. officials were often frustrated in their efforts to enforce the law, Head finds that civil claims were often pursued by the attacked merchants with greater success. It was only with the end of the wars, though, that the activities of these privateers came to an end, leaving them to embark upon lives often changed by their dramatic experiences.

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Dec 12 2017 · 39mins
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David Head, “Privateers of the Americas: Spanish American Privateering from the United States in the Early Republic” (U. Georgia Press, 2015)

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When the nations of Latin America fought for their independence in the early 19th century, they commissioned privateers stationed in the United States to attack Spanish skipping. In Privateers of the Americas: Spanish American Privateering from the United States in the Early Republic (University of Georgia Press, 2015), David Head examines the activities of these privateers within the context of the contemporary Atlantic world. As Head explains, these privateers, most of whom were American citizens, existed in a complex environment of international politics, diplomacy, and economic activity. Operating in violation of U.S. law, they evaded the authorities in a variety of ways, from clandestine operations in the Louisiana bayous to deceptive claims to port authorities in Baltimore. While U.S. officials were often frustrated in their efforts to enforce the law, Head finds that civil claims were often pursued by the attacked merchants with greater success. It was only with the end of the wars, though, that the activities of these privateers came to an end, leaving them to embark upon lives often changed by their dramatic experiences.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dec 12 2017 · 39mins
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David Head, “Privateers of the Americas: Spanish American Privateering from the United States in the Early Republic” (U. Georgia Press, 2015)

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When the nations of Latin America fought for their independence in the early 19th century, they commissioned privateers stationed in the United States to attack Spanish skipping. In Privateers of the Americas: Spanish American Privateering from the United States in the Early Republic (University of Georgia Press, 2015), David Head examines the activities of these privateers within the context of the contemporary Atlantic world. As Head explains, these privateers, most of whom were American citizens, existed in a complex environment of international politics, diplomacy, and economic activity. Operating in violation of U.S. law, they evaded the authorities in a variety of ways, from clandestine operations in the Louisiana bayous to deceptive claims to port authorities in Baltimore. While U.S. officials were often frustrated in their efforts to enforce the law, Head finds that civil claims were often pursued by the attacked merchants with greater success. It was only with the end of the wars, though, that the activities of these privateers came to an end, leaving them to embark upon lives often changed by their dramatic experiences.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dec 12 2017 · 39mins
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David Head 12-30-12

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December 30, 2012 message by David Head at Pleasant Hill UMC in Bessemer, AL
Dec 30 2012 · 20mins