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19 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Dolly Chugh. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Dolly Chugh, often where they are interviewed.

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19 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Dolly Chugh. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Dolly Chugh, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

Episode 040. Be the person you mean to be with writer and researcher Dr. Dolly Chugh

Leadership Lab with Dr. Patrick Leddin
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New York University (NYU) professor, author, and researcher Dr. Dolly Chugh joins Patrick in the ‘lab’ to discuss how good people fight bias. Dolly’s book Be the Person You Mean to Be has quickly become a must have among leaders everywhere. Don’t miss the chance to learn first-hand from a true pioneer in the field of organizational behavior. Her insights will help you to become an even better leader today! Take the 5-Week Leadership Challenge at www.leddingroup.com/5wlc. Learn more about Dolly at www.DollyChugh.com

May 13 2020

42mins

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Fighting The Good Fight Against Bias with Dolly Chugh

OutsideVoices with Mark Bidwell
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In this episode, we are joined by author and social scientist, Dolly Chugh, to discuss her book, The Person You Mean to Be: How Good People Fight Bias, which studies how implicit bias and unintentional ethical behaviour affects our everyday decision making. Dolly is a Professor of Management and Organizations at New York University, has won several awards for excellence in teaching and ethics, and is a monthly columnist for Forbes.com.

What We Covered

  • Why our brains are biased, and the ways in which we can begin to recognize our own conscious and unconscious biases
  • Why confirmation bias can hinder the success of a recruiting the best potential talent in the workplace
  • How we can learn to recognize and use our own privileges to challenge and help change other people’s biases
Key Takeaways and Learnings
  • The growth mindset: why seeing ourselves as a ‘work in progress’ can help us to learn from other perspectives
  • Conscious and unconscious biases: why affinities and associations with our personal identity can lead us to make less successful decisions
  • The business benefits that come from bringing in different perspectives to core business processes, including higher levels of innovation, increased creativity, improved employee retention and recruiting success
Links and Resources Mentioned in this Episode

May 12 2020

38mins

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The Person You Mean to Be with Dr. Dolly Chugh

Daily Authors
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On today's incredible episode, I'm speaking with the lovely and talented Dr. Dolly Chugh, author of …

The Person You Mean to Be: How Good People Fight Bias

Dolly is a Harvard educated, award-winning social psychologist at the NYU Stern School of Business, where she is an expert researcher in the unconscious biases and unethical behavior of ordinary, good people.

Dolly has been named one of the Top 100 Most Influential People in Business Ethics (a list that included Pope Francis, Angelina Jolie, and Bill Gates).

She has appeared live on MSNBC, and her research is regularly featured in numerous media outlets, including National Public Radio, NBC News, The New York Times, and Forbes to name a few.

So, if you are ready to discover the person you mean to be, then stay tuned for this episode of the Daily Authors Podcast with Dr. Dolly Chugh ...

... and make sure to pickup The Person You Mean to Be on Amazon!

By the way, if you are ready to write your book, go to Write a Book University to get a free 4 lesson video course to help you on your journey to write a book ...

Nov 14 2019

26mins

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Guest: Dolly Chugh - Author of The Person You Mean to Be

Leaders Get Real
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Dolly Chugh delivered one of the 25 Most Popular TED Talks of 2018 for good reason. Author of the acclaimed The Person You Mean to Be: How Good People Fight Bias, she’s also an award-winning, tenured professor at the New York University Stern School of Business where she studies the psychology of good people and teaches MBA courses in leadership, management, and negotiations.

Dolly has been named one of the Top 100 Most Influential People in Business Ethics (along with Pope Francis, Angelina Jolie, and Bill Gates) by Ethisphere Magazine.

Prior to joining the NYU faculty, Dolly worked at Morgan Stanley, Time Inc., Scholastic, and Merrill Lynch. Dolly has degrees from Cornell University (B.A.) and Harvard University (M.B.A., Ph.D.)

Oct 29 2019

59mins

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The Person You Mean to Be with Dr. Dolly Chugh

The Workr Beeing Podcast
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We all want to be better people, but we are often unwilling to admit we have weaknesses or that we are wrong. NYU Stern professor…

Continue reading → The Person You Mean to Be with Dr. Dolly Chugh

The post The Person You Mean to Be with Dr. Dolly Chugh appeared first on Workr Beeing.

Oct 10 2019

25mins

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Dolly Chugh /// Bounded Ethicality /// E049

More In Common Podcast
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Dolly Chugh is an award-winning, tenured professor at the New York University Stern School of Business. She studies the psychology of good people, or “bounded ethicality”.  Dolly teaches MBA courses in leadership, management, and negotiations.  Additionally, she has taught at a men’s prison through the NYU Prison Education Program at the Wallkill Correctional Facility, where she is currently running a book club.

Dolly’s first book, The Person You Mean to Be: How Good People Fight Bias (HarperCollins, 2018) has received acclaim from Malcolm Gladwell, Adam Grant, Susan Cain, Daniel Pink, Billie Jean King, Carol Dweck, David Thomas, and Angela Duckworth. 

Dolly’s research integrates the theories and methods of social psychology, behavioral economics, judgment and decision making, sociology, and education. Dolly has published more than 20 articles and book chapters on these topics in both top managerial and academic publications, such as the Harvard Business Review, Psychological Science, Administrative Science Quarterly, Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Research in Organizational Behavior, and The American Economic Review.

Dolly does a small number of select speaking engagements, which have recently included Starbucks’ corporate headquarters, Google, the American Museum of Natural History, and the Hollywood Commission on Sexual Harassment and Diversity chaired by Anita Hill.  Dolly’s 2018 TED Talk has been viewed more than 3 million times and was named one of The 25 Most Popular TED Talks of 2018.  Until recently, Dolly also wrote a monthly column about race, gender, diversity, inclusion, and bias for Forbes.com.

Dolly’s work has appeared in Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg, What Works by Iris Bohnet and Rage Becomes Her by Soraya Chemaly, as well as a recent White House Council of Economic Advisors Issue Brief. She has appeared on the Melissa Harris-Perry Show on MSNBC and Bloomberg News, as well as numerous podcasts, including Choiceology and 10% Happier.  Her research is regularly featured in numerous media outlets, including National Public Radio, NBC News, Quartz, goop, CNBC.com, Scientific American, Forbes, The Washington Post, CosmoGirl, The New York Times, The Economist, The Huffington Post, The Financial Times, and The Stanford Social Innovation Review. Her first-authored Sunday New York Times Op-Ed, titled “Professors Are Prejudiced, Too” (with Katherine Milkman and Modupe Akinola), was in that weekend’s Top 20 most-emailed/read/tweeted articles.

Dolly has been named one of the Top 100 Most Influential People in Business Ethics (a list that included Pope Francis, Angelina Jolie, and Bill Gates) by Ethisphere Magazine, a finalist for the Faculty Rising Star Pioneer Award by the Aspen Institute, and the recipient of the prestigious New York University Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Faculty Award (whose past recipients include Bryan Stevenson). As one of the most highly rated business school professors at New York University, she received the Stern School of Business Teaching Excellence Award in 2015.

Prior to becoming an academic, Dolly worked at Morgan Stanley, Time Inc., Scholastic, and Merrill Lynch. Dolly received a B.A. from Cornell University, where she earned a double major in Psychology and Economics and served as a two-time co-captain of the Varsity Tennis Team (1990); an M.B.A. from the Harvard Business School (1994); and a Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior / Social Psychology from Harvard University (2006).

In addition, Dolly has played a central role as a faculty member in the KIPP Charter School network's renowned School Leadership Programs since 2008. She also mentors several first-generation college students and their families.

 

“It’s OK to keep learning”
— DOLLY CHUGH

Topics we cover///

  • Forks Up vs. Forks down and other Dishwasher etiquette

  • Her path from working as an investment banker to becoming a renowned researcher and professor

  • Bounded Ethicality

    • What it is

    • How it came to be

  • Her parents

    • Their Influence

    • A portion of their immigration story

  • What it was like growing up for her as often the only Indian girl in school

  • Headwinds and Tailwinds from Debbie Irving and how it impacts people culturally

  • Discussing Unconscious bias, science that supports it and how it plays into be a Good-ish person

References:

 Credits:

 Lead editor + Producer: Ruf Holmes

Music:

 Main Theme: "I dunno" by grapes (c) copyright 2008 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license.http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/grapes/16626 Ft: J Lang, Morusqu

Guest theme: "Palladian" by Blue Dot Sessions freemusicarchive.org

Aug 01 2019

1hr 13mins

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Boxed In: With Guests Sophie Morgan, Modupe Akinola & Dolly Chugh

Choiceology with Katy Milkman
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Assuming you live in the northern hemisphere, which would you say is colder: a day in March or a Day in April? On average, of course, March is colder than April, but there’s probably not a big difference in temperature between March 31 and April 1. If you’re like most people, though, you put March days in the colder March category and April days in the warmer April category. It’s a useful shortcut, but it doesn’t always give you the best information about the temperature on individual days.

This tendency to quickly categorize time, objects and people helps us to simplify a complex world, but it can also lead to important errors.

In this episode of Choiceology with Katy Milkman, we look at the ways our snap judgments work for us and against us.

First, Katy brings you a profile of Sophie Morgan, tracing her career path from relative unknown to reality TV model to lead presenter at one of the largest sporting events in the world. And you’ll find out what makes Sophie unique in her field.

Next, we hit the street with a quick questionnaire to see how people make judgments when faced with uncertainty or incomplete information. You can try these questions yourself, before you listen:

Question 1: William is an opera fan who enjoys touring art museums when he goes on vacation. He enjoys playing chess with his friends. Which is more likely?

A: William is a professional violinist for a major symphony orchestra.

B: William is a farmer.

Question 2: Amy is 29 years old. She’s single, outspoken and very bright. As a student, she majored in English literature and was deeply interested in theater. Which is more probable?

A: Amy is a bank teller.

B: Amy is a bank teller and writes an arts review for her local newspaper.

After revealing the answers to our questionnaire, Katy is joined by Modupe Akinola, of Columbia Business School and Dolly Chugh of New York University’s Stern School of Business to explore the functions and flaws of these types of judgments and the mental architecture behind them.

Dolly Chugh is the author of The Person You Mean to Be: How Good People Fight Bias.

Finally, Katy gives you some simple strategies to counteract some of the negative impacts of snap judgments and implicit attitudes.

Choiceology is an original podcast from Charles Schwab. For more on the series, visit schwab.com/podcast.

If you enjoy the show, please leave a ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ rating or review on Apple Podcasts.

Important Disclosures:

All expressions of opinion are subject to change without notice in reaction to shifting market conditions.

The comments, views, and opinions expressed in the presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent the views of Charles Schwab.

Data contained herein from third-party providers is obtained from what are considered reliable sources. However, its accuracy, completeness or reliability cannot be guaranteed.

The Schwab Center for Financial Research is a division of Charles Schwab & Co., Inc.

(0519-9AKG)

May 13 2019

33mins

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Episode 143: Dolly Chugh On Unconscious Bias, Having Healthy Conversations About Privilege, and How to Become the Person You Mean to Be

The Caleb Mason Podcast
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In this episode, Caleb talks with social psychologist, Dr. Dolly Chugh, about unconscious bias, having healthy conversations about privilege, how to become the person you mean to be, and more.

Guest Links

[Dolly's website][1]

[Dolly on Facebook][2]

[Dolly on Twitter][3]

[The Person You Mean to Be by Dolly Chugh][4]

Links Mentioned

[Work Rules! by Laszlo Bock][5]

[Project Implicit by Harvard][6]

The Learner's Corner Recommended Resource

[RELEVANT Podcast: Episode 697: Social Club Misfits][7]

[Pastor PreachersNSneakers Should Concern You by Sam Luce][8]

Episode Sponsor

Reach out to Sam Massey - sammassey77@gmail.com

[Sam on Instagram][9]

What We Learned

The story behind Google's Laszlo Bock endorsing the book.

What unconscious bias is.

Everyone either has a headwind or tailwind.

Research shows that the person with the headwind speaks up they are not taken as seriously as the person with the tailwind.

How to have healthy conversations about privilege

Light based conversations vs. heat based conversations

The 20 / 60 / 20 Rules

How to have healthy conversations on social media

The difference between willful ignorance and willful awareness

When we see humanity in others it gives us permission to see our own humanity.

How to get started.

The difference between a fixed mindset and growth mindset is a learning mindset.

New Episode Every Week

Thank you for listening to the Learner's Corner Podcast.

We hope you'll join us for next week's episode. Until next time, keep learning and keep growing.
[1]: http://www.dollychugh.com
[2]: https://www.facebook.com/dolly.chugh.author
[3]: https://twitter.com/DollyChugh
[4]: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0062692143/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_taft_p1_i0
[5]: https://www.amazon.com/Work-Rules-Insights-Inside-Transform/dp/1455554790/ref=sr_1_1?crid=22WMY5YCKP9FX&keywords=work%20rules%20insights%20from%20google%20laszlo%20bock&qid=1556496397&s=gateway&sprefix=work%20rules,aps,229&sr=8-1
[6]: https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/
[7]: https://relevantmagazine.com/podcast/social-club-misfits-2/
[8]: http://samluce.com/2019/04/pastor-preachersnsneakers-should-concern-you/
[9]: https://www.instagram.com/sammassey77/

Apr 30 2019

57mins

Play

#180: Dolly Chugh, How Good People Fight Bias

Ten Percent Happier with Dan Harris
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We all have biases, and only by acknowledging them can we make a conscious decision to not act on them. That's one of the teachings of our guest this week, award-winning psychologist Dolly Chugh, who studies the psychology of human bias. She's also the author of the book, "The Person You Mean To Be: How Good People Fight Bias." Chugh also discusses the role meditation can play in helping to combat acting on our biases.

The Plug Zone
Website: http://www.dollychugh.com/
Book: http://www.dollychugh.com/book

Mar 27 2019

1hr 30mins

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Out of Focus: With Guests Dolly Chugh, Max Bazerman & Mark Pendergrast

Choiceology with Katy Milkman
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If you’ve ever watched a TV crime drama, you’ve probably heard that eyewitness testimony is notoriously unreliable. A person commits a crime literally right in front of someone, but the witness can’t identify key characteristics of the perpetrator—or worse, gets the details wrong and implicates an innocent person. Why does this happen?

In this episode of Choiceology with Katy Milkman, we look at the limitations of attention and perception.

The episode begins with the description of a surprising experiment involving two teams passing basketballs. You can try the experiment here, even if you’ve already listened to the episode.

Katy follows with the story of one of the most famous marketing blunders of all time: the introduction of New Coke by the Coca Cola Company. Mark Pendergrast, author of For God, Country & Coca Cola, recounts the history of the brand and takes you inside the company to explain how their executives came to a disastrous decision.

Robert Teszka then demonstrates how magicians harness the limitations of an audience’s attention in order to surprise and entertain.

Next, we hear from Dolly Chugh of New York University’s Stern School of Business and Max Bazerman of the Harvard Business School. They explain how this tendency to miss important information is systematic and predictable, and how it can negatively affect decisions in business and life. Dolly Chugh is the author of The Person You Mean to Be: How Good People Fight Bias. Max Bazerman is the author of The Power of Noticing: What the Best Leaders See.

Finally, Katy offers simple strategies to help you expand your awareness and make better-informed decisions.

Choiceology is an original podcast from Charles Schwab. For more on the series, visit schwab.com/podcast.

If you enjoy the show, please leave a ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ rating or review on Apple Podcasts.

Important Disclosures:

All expressions of opinion are subject to change without notice in reaction to shifting market conditions.

The comments, views, and opinions expressed in the presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent the views of Charles Schwab.

Data contained herein from third-party providers is obtained from what are considered reliable sources. However, its accuracy, completeness or reliability cannot be guaranteed.

(0319-92FV)

Mar 18 2019

39mins

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