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Carl Suddler

9 Podcast Episodes

Latest 18 Sep 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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BRING IT IN: Carl Suddler

BRING IT IN

Today on BRING IT IN TrueHoop’s David Thorpe and Henry Abbott talked first with Wall Street Journal reporter Ben Cohen about his December 2020 article on whether star athletes should be vaccinated early. It’s suddenly relevant as NBA Commissioner Adam Silver has made comments about about players jumping in line. Then Henry and David spoke with Emory University historian Dr. Carl Suddler, author of Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York. They talked about the thin blue line on the Bucks new alternate uniforms, “copaganda,” the fetishization of uniforms, and much more. RECENT BRING IT IN EPISODES:FRIDAY January 16, 2020 Jarod Hector on how perfect it was that Christian Wood called Shaquille O’Neal “casual.”THURSDAY January 14, 2020 Special BRING IT IN on the Harden trade.WEDNESDAY January 13, 2020 David Thorpe on how the Warriors are different this year.MONDAY January 11, 2020 TrueHoop on NBA’s loosening grip on COVID-19.FRIDAY January 8, 2020 Jarod Hector on the most powerful offensive force in the NBA.WEDNESDAY January 6, 2020 Lindsay Gibbs on the WNBA’s role in the historic Georgia senate runoff elections.MONDAY January 4, 2020 David Thorpe’s observations from the first two weeks of the 2020-2021 season.MONDAY December 28, 2020 TrueHoop’s favorite moments from a crazy year of BRING IT IN. This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at www.truehoop.com/subscribe

1hr

20 Jan 2021

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BRING IT IN: Adena Jones, Dr. Carl Suddler

BRING IT IN

Today on BRING IT IN TrueHoop Special Correspondent Adena Jones takes us on a tour of WNBA player reaction to comments from Atlanta Dream investor Sen. Kelly Loeffler, who has called armed Black protesters in Atlanta “mob rule.”Then Jones, Henry Abbott, and David Thorpe spoke with Dr. Carl Suddler, a scholar of African American history and author of Presumed Criminal:Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York. They discussed the history of the carceral state in the U.S. and how the WNBA’s response to Sen. Loeffler’s anti-BLM statements might give NBA players inspiration to make their own demands.RECENT BRING IT IN EPISODES:MONDAY July 6, 2020 Jane McManus on how gender might play a role in the decisions being made in reopening U.S. sports.FRIDAY July 3, 2020 Jarod Hector on Makur Maker choosing Howard University over UCLA.WEDNESDAY July 1, 2020 Lloyd Pierce on the unprecedented move by the Hawks to partner with Fulton County to transform the State Farm Arena into a voter precinct.MONDAY June 29, 2020 Zachary Binney, on the risk to players and staff of reopening play.FRIDAY June 26, 2020 Jarod Hector on Vince Carter’s retirement.WEDNESDAY June 24, 2020 Keith Reed on the day of reckoning for media for its lack of diversity.MONDAY June 22, 2020 Maria Konnikova on testosterone impacts decision making.FRIDAY June 19, 2020 Jarod Hector on the NBA snitching hotline and the significance of Juneteenth.THURSDAY June 18, 2020 Scott Eden, on his story "The Prosecution of Thabo Sefolosha." This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at www.truehoop.com/subscribe

59mins

8 Jul 2020

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BRING IT IN: Dr. Carl Suddler

BRING IT IN

Today on BRING IT IN Henry Abbott and David Thorpe spoke with Dr. Carl Suddler, a scholar of African American history and author of Presumed CriminalBlack Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York. TrueHoop Special Correspondent Adena Jones updated us on how NBA players have been reacting to the nation’s police brutality protests and news of Disney World hosting the rest of the season.Then Dr. Suddler, David, Henry, Adena, and Jarod Hector talked about Dr. Suddler’s book, basketball as a racial unifying force, and the debate about defunding the police.The video is here:RECENT BRING IT IN EPISODES:MONDAY June 8, 2020 Erica Vanstone on roller derby’s impressive data-driven international plan to return to play amidst the coronavirus pandemic.FRIDAY June 5, 2020 Jarod Hector on NBA’s response to the police brutality protests.THURSDAY June 4, 2020 Henry Abbott and David Thorpe discuss news that the NBA is back.WEDNESDAY June 3, 2020 Ari Caroline on what can/will the league do to minimize coronavirus risk when reopening the season.TUESDAY June 2, 2020 Steve Magness and Brad Stulberg on “psychological safety” and the importance of feeling like you’re on a path to progress.MONDAY June 1, 2020 Jesse Washington on legendary coach John Thompson.FRIDAY May 29, 2020 Jarod Hector on George Floyd, riots, and the humanity of NBA players. It’s a must listen.THURSDAY May 28, 2020 Michael Grange on World Cup-style pool play replacing the first round of the NBA playoffs.WEDNESDAY May 27, 2020 Dr. Wayne Winston on why he doesn’t think Michael Jordan is the GOAT. This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at www.truehoop.com/subscribe

59mins

9 Jun 2020

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Carl Suddler, "Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York" (NYU Press, 2019)

New Books in History

A stark disparity exists between black and white youth experiences in the justice system today. Black youths are perceived to be older and less innocent than their white peers. When it comes to incarceration, race trumps class, and even as black youths articulate their own experiences with carceral authorities, many Americans remain surprised by the inequalities they continue to endure. In Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York (NYU Press, 2019), Carl Suddler brings to light a much longer history of the policies and strategies that tethered the lives of black youths to the justice system indefinitely.The criminalization of black youth is inseparable from its racialized origins. In the mid-twentieth century, the United States justice system began to focus on punishment, rather than rehabilitation. By the time the federal government began to address the issue of juvenile delinquency, the juvenile justice system shifted its priorities from saving delinquent youth to purely controlling crime, and black teens bore the brunt of the transition.In New York City, increased state surveillance of predominantly black communities compounded arrest rates during the post–World War II period, providing justification for tough-on-crime policies. Questionable police practices, like stop-and-frisk, combined with media sensationalism, cemented the belief that black youth were the primary cause for concern. Even before the War on Crime, the stakes were clear: race would continue to be the crucial determinant in American notions of crime and delinquency, and black youths condemned with a stigma of criminality would continue to confront the overwhelming power of the state.Adam McNeil is a PhD Student in History at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

1hr 5mins

28 May 2020

Most Popular

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Carl Suddler, "Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York" (NYU Press, 2019)

New Books in American Studies

A stark disparity exists between black and white youth experiences in the justice system today. Black youths are perceived to be older and less innocent than their white peers. When it comes to incarceration, race trumps class, and even as black youths articulate their own experiences with carceral authorities, many Americans remain surprised by the inequalities they continue to endure. In Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York (NYU Press, 2019), Carl Suddler brings to light a much longer history of the policies and strategies that tethered the lives of black youths to the justice system indefinitely.The criminalization of black youth is inseparable from its racialized origins. In the mid-twentieth century, the United States justice system began to focus on punishment, rather than rehabilitation. By the time the federal government began to address the issue of juvenile delinquency, the juvenile justice system shifted its priorities from saving delinquent youth to purely controlling crime, and black teens bore the brunt of the transition.In New York City, increased state surveillance of predominantly black communities compounded arrest rates during the post–World War II period, providing justification for tough-on-crime policies. Questionable police practices, like stop-and-frisk, combined with media sensationalism, cemented the belief that black youth were the primary cause for concern. Even before the War on Crime, the stakes were clear: race would continue to be the crucial determinant in American notions of crime and delinquency, and black youths condemned with a stigma of criminality would continue to confront the overwhelming power of the state.Adam McNeil is a PhD Student in History at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

1hr 5mins

28 May 2020

Episode artwork

Carl Suddler, "Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York" (NYU Press, 2019)

New Books in Law

A stark disparity exists between black and white youth experiences in the justice system today. Black youths are perceived to be older and less innocent than their white peers. When it comes to incarceration, race trumps class, and even as black youths articulate their own experiences with carceral authorities, many Americans remain surprised by the inequalities they continue to endure. In Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York (NYU Press, 2019), Carl Suddler brings to light a much longer history of the policies and strategies that tethered the lives of black youths to the justice system indefinitely.The criminalization of black youth is inseparable from its racialized origins. In the mid-twentieth century, the United States justice system began to focus on punishment, rather than rehabilitation. By the time the federal government began to address the issue of juvenile delinquency, the juvenile justice system shifted its priorities from saving delinquent youth to purely controlling crime, and black teens bore the brunt of the transition.In New York City, increased state surveillance of predominantly black communities compounded arrest rates during the post–World War II period, providing justification for tough-on-crime policies. Questionable police practices, like stop-and-frisk, combined with media sensationalism, cemented the belief that black youth were the primary cause for concern. Even before the War on Crime, the stakes were clear: race would continue to be the crucial determinant in American notions of crime and delinquency, and black youths condemned with a stigma of criminality would continue to confront the overwhelming power of the state.Adam McNeil is a PhD Student in History at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

1hr 5mins

28 May 2020

Episode artwork

Carl Suddler, "Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York" (NYU Press, 2019)

New Books in Public Policy

A stark disparity exists between black and white youth experiences in the justice system today. Black youths are perceived to be older and less innocent than their white peers. When it comes to incarceration, race trumps class, and even as black youths articulate their own experiences with carceral authorities, many Americans remain surprised by the inequalities they continue to endure. In Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York (NYU Press, 2019), Carl Suddler brings to light a much longer history of the policies and strategies that tethered the lives of black youths to the justice system indefinitely.The criminalization of black youth is inseparable from its racialized origins. In the mid-twentieth century, the United States justice system began to focus on punishment, rather than rehabilitation. By the time the federal government began to address the issue of juvenile delinquency, the juvenile justice system shifted its priorities from saving delinquent youth to purely controlling crime, and black teens bore the brunt of the transition.In New York City, increased state surveillance of predominantly black communities compounded arrest rates during the post–World War II period, providing justification for tough-on-crime policies. Questionable police practices, like stop-and-frisk, combined with media sensationalism, cemented the belief that black youth were the primary cause for concern. Even before the War on Crime, the stakes were clear: race would continue to be the crucial determinant in American notions of crime and delinquency, and black youths condemned with a stigma of criminality would continue to confront the overwhelming power of the state.Adam McNeil is a PhD Student in History at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/public-policy

1hr 5mins

28 May 2020

Episode artwork

Carl Suddler, "Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York" (NYU Press, 2019)

New Books in African American Studies

A stark disparity exists between black and white youth experiences in the justice system today. Black youths are perceived to be older and less innocent than their white peers. When it comes to incarceration, race trumps class, and even as black youths articulate their own experiences with carceral authorities, many Americans remain surprised by the inequalities they continue to endure. In Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York (NYU Press, 2019), Carl Suddler brings to light a much longer history of the policies and strategies that tethered the lives of black youths to the justice system indefinitely.The criminalization of black youth is inseparable from its racialized origins. In the mid-twentieth century, the United States justice system began to focus on punishment, rather than rehabilitation. By the time the federal government began to address the issue of juvenile delinquency, the juvenile justice system shifted its priorities from saving delinquent youth to purely controlling crime, and black teens bore the brunt of the transition.In New York City, increased state surveillance of predominantly black communities compounded arrest rates during the post–World War II period, providing justification for tough-on-crime policies. Questionable police practices, like stop-and-frisk, combined with media sensationalism, cemented the belief that black youth were the primary cause for concern. Even before the War on Crime, the stakes were clear: race would continue to be the crucial determinant in American notions of crime and delinquency, and black youths condemned with a stigma of criminality would continue to confront the overwhelming power of the state.Adam McNeil is a PhD Student in History at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

1hr 5mins

28 May 2020

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#156: Black Youth and the Criminal Justice System Ft. Carl Suddler

Politics and Polls

Racism affects our criminal justice system — from policing methods to prison-system structures to punishments issued for different crimes. More than 50 years after the publication of the Kerner Report — which investigated the 1967 race riots — many of the same problems of institutionalized racism persist today. Carl Suddler joins Julian Zelizer in this episode to discuss the racialized nature of the criminal justice system, which is the topic of his new book, “Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York.” The book examines history of policies and strategies that led to the criminalization of black youth, including stop-and-frisk policing and no-knock warrants, and media coverage of black youth and crime. Suddler is an assistant professor in the Department of History at Emory University. Prior to joining to Emory faculty this year, Suddler was an assistant professor of African American history at Florida Atlantic University and a postdoctoral fellow at the James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference at Emory. His research focuses on the intersections of youth, race, and crime and on the consequences of inequity in the United States. Suddler is also a contributing writer for the Conversation and Bleacher Report and has published work in the Journal of American History, Journal of African American History, American Studies Journal, and The Washington Post.

29mins

10 Oct 2019