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Preston Lauterbach Podcasts

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10 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Preston Lauterbach. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Preston Lauterbach, often where they are interviewed.

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10 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Preston Lauterbach. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Preston Lauterbach, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Preston Lauterbach - Bluff City

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Preston Lauterbach  is an author of non-fiction who has concentrated on the African-American experience of the American South, and Memphis in particular. Hi First book was The Chitlin' Circuit and the Road to Rock 'n' Roll, about musical venues and musicians in the south and neighboring states serving a black clientele with good times and better music. His second book was Beale Street Dynasty, which looked at the early and prime days of the capital of black America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Today we're talking about his latest book, Bluff City: The Secret Life of Photographer Ernest Withers, the man responsible for many of the greatest photos of the civil rights era and how his legacy has come into question since it was revealed that he was an informant for the FBI.

Mar 09 2019 · 58mins
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Neighborhood Connect Podcast | South City Past, Present and Future with Author, Preston Lauterbach & Memphis Heritage Trails

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Paul Young and Joyce Cox visit visit with Preston Lauterbach, author of the award-winning books Beale Street Dynasty, The Chitlin Circuit and the widely-read article, Memphis Burning  [ https://placesjournal.org/article/memphis-burning/ ]  and Felicia Harris of the Memphis Heritage Trail Project.

They cover a wide range of topics:

  1. Preston's work (Beale Street Dynasty and Memphis Burning)
  2. Confederate Statues
  3. South City and its development

Enjoy!!!

Oct 18 2017 · 38mins

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Ep. 15: The Chitlin’ Circuit and the Road to Rock n’ Roll: Preston Lauterbach on Rock’s Forgotten Pioneers

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When we think about the roots of rock n’ roll, we generally tend to think about people like Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Buddy Holly. For reasons owing to politics, race, and the various prejudices of historians and music journalists, many of the earliest African-American blues, jazz, and r n’ b pioneers, such as Louis […]

The post Ep. 15: The Chitlin’ Circuit and the Road to Rock n’ Roll: Preston Lauterbach on Rock’s Forgotten Pioneers appeared first on Travels in Music.

Jun 30 2016 · 43mins
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Ep. 77: Preston Lauterbach on Memphis, Race and Beale Street

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Writer and cultural historian Preston Lauterbach is the guest on this week's installment of The Chauncey DeVega Show. Preston is the author of the great new book Beale Street Dynasty which examines the intersecting lives, fascinating personalities, the power of the color line, and self-made men in the post-Civil War South. In all, Beale Street Dynasty is an amazing work that reveals a great deal about sex, song, and politics in Memphis, Tennessee, and America, more broadly.

Preston does some great sharing and teaching in this week's episode. Chauncey and Preston talk about Elvis Presley and race, day-to-day life for black entertainers on the "Chitlin' Circuit", politics and life in the post war South, navigating freedom and slavery, and the life of the amazing black politician-gangster-entrepreneur-arts patron Mr. Robert Church.

During this week's episode of the podcast, Chauncey talks about Donald Trump and professional wrestling, offers up his own conspiracy theory about the death of Antonin Scalia, and complains about impending decrepitude and his irritated skin.

Feb 18 2016 · 1hr 26mins

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Preston Lauterbach, “Beale Street Dynasty: Sex, Song, and the Struggle for the Soul of Memphis” (Norton, 2015)

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Following the Civil War, Memphis emerged a center of black progress, optimism, and cultural ferment, after a period of turmoil. Preston Lauterbach joins host Jonathan Judaken for an in-depth discussion in advance of the launch of Lauterbach’s latest book, Beale Street Dynasty: Sex, Song, and the Struggle for the Soul of Memphis (Norton, 2015).


Robert Church, Sr., who would become “the South’s first black millionaire,” was a slave owned by his white father. Having survived a deadly race riot in 1866, Church constructed an empire of vice in the booming river town of post-Civil War Memphis. He made a fortune with saloons, gambling, and–shockingly–white prostitution. But he also nurtured the militant journalism of Ida B. Wells and helped revolutionize American music through the work of composer W.C. Handy, the man called “the inventor of the blues.”


In the face of Jim Crow, the Church fortune helped fashion the most powerful black political organization of the early twentieth century. Robert and his son, Robert, Jr., bought and sold property, founded a bank, and created a park and auditorium for their people finer than the places whites had forbidden them to attend.


However, the Church family operated through a tense arrangement with the Democrat machine run by the notorious E. H. “Boss” Crump, who stole elections and controlled city hall. The battle between this black dynasty and the white political machine would define the future of Memphis.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Aug 04 2015 · 36mins
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Preston Lauterbach, “Beale Street Dynasty: Sex, Song, and the Struggle for the Soul of Memphis” (Norton, 2015)

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Following the Civil War, Memphis emerged a center of black progress, optimism, and cultural ferment, after a period of turmoil. Preston Lauterbach joins host Jonathan Judaken for an in-depth discussion in advance of the launch of Lauterbach’s latest book, Beale Street Dynasty: Sex, Song, and the Struggle for the Soul of Memphis (Norton, 2015).


Robert Church, Sr., who would become “the South’s first black millionaire,” was a slave owned by his white father. Having survived a deadly race riot in 1866, Church constructed an empire of vice in the booming river town of post-Civil War Memphis. He made a fortune with saloons, gambling, and–shockingly–white prostitution. But he also nurtured the militant journalism of Ida B. Wells and helped revolutionize American music through the work of composer W.C. Handy, the man called “the inventor of the blues.”


In the face of Jim Crow, the Church fortune helped fashion the most powerful black political organization of the early twentieth century. Robert and his son, Robert, Jr., bought and sold property, founded a bank, and created a park and auditorium for their people finer than the places whites had forbidden them to attend.


However, the Church family operated through a tense arrangement with the Democrat machine run by the notorious E. H. “Boss” Crump, who stole elections and controlled city hall. The battle between this black dynasty and the white political machine would define the future of Memphis.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Aug 04 2015 · 36mins
Episode artwork

Preston Lauterbach, “Beale Street Dynasty: Sex, Song, and the Struggle for the Soul of Memphis” (Norton, 2015)

Play
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Following the Civil War, Memphis emerged a center of black progress, optimism, and cultural ferment, after a period of turmoil. Preston Lauterbach joins host Jonathan Judaken for an in-depth discussion in advance of the launch of Lauterbach’s latest book, Beale Street Dynasty: Sex, Song, and the Struggle for the Soul of Memphis (Norton, 2015).


Robert Church, Sr., who would become “the South’s first black millionaire,” was a slave owned by his white father. Having survived a deadly race riot in 1866, Church constructed an empire of vice in the booming river town of post-Civil War Memphis. He made a fortune with saloons, gambling, and–shockingly–white prostitution. But he also nurtured the militant journalism of Ida B. Wells and helped revolutionize American music through the work of composer W.C. Handy, the man called “the inventor of the blues.”


In the face of Jim Crow, the Church fortune helped fashion the most powerful black political organization of the early twentieth century. Robert and his son, Robert, Jr., bought and sold property, founded a bank, and created a park and auditorium for their people finer than the places whites had forbidden them to attend.


However, the Church family operated through a tense arrangement with the Democrat machine run by the notorious E. H. “Boss” Crump, who stole elections and controlled city hall. The battle between this black dynasty and the white political machine would define the future of Memphis.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Aug 04 2015 · 36mins
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Preston Lauterbach, “The Chitlin’ Circuit and the Road to Rock ‘n’ Roll” (W. W. Norton, 2011)

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Where does rock ‘n’ roll begin?


In The Chitlin’ Circuit and the Road to Rock ‘n’ Roll (W. W. Norton, 2011), Preston Lauterbach makes a strong case for its beginnings in the backwoods and small-town juke joints, fed by big-city racketeering, of the black American South. It begins, possibly, on Indianapolis’s Indiana Avenue where Denver Fergusun ran numbers, paid-off cops, and operated the Sunset Terrace. It begins, maybe, in Houston where Don Robey was the proprietor of the Bronze Peacock, oversaw a network of bars and taverns throughout Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana, and was a founder of the seminal Peacock Records. Maybe it began in Memphis, home of W.C. Handy, Beale Street, and the Mitchell Hotel. Or maybe it was the multitude of juke joints that littered the American South from Texas to Florida, Georgia to Chicago, in the 1930s and 40s that afforded artists such as Walter Barnes, Louis Jordan, Little Richard, and Roy Brown a series of non-stop one-nighters to ply their raunchy jumped-up versions of swing and the blues to an insatiable audience of primarily African American men and women looking for good times. In the book Lauterbach details the Chitlin’ Circuit as it was, a network of promoters, clubs, radio stations, con-men, highways and, most importantly, musicians that supported an underground artistic economy and lifestyle just beneath the surface of the mainstream music industry; a network that gave birth to rock ‘n’ roll.

The Chitlin’ Circuit is Preston’s first book. He is currently working on his second, a hustler’s history of Beale Street.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jan 15 2013 · 59mins
Episode artwork

Preston Lauterbach, “The Chitlin’ Circuit and the Road to Rock ‘n’ Roll” (W. W. Norton, 2011)

Play
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Where does rock ‘n’ roll begin?


In The Chitlin’ Circuit and the Road to Rock ‘n’ Roll (W. W. Norton, 2011), Preston Lauterbach makes a strong case for its beginnings in the backwoods and small-town juke joints, fed by big-city racketeering, of the black American South. It begins, possibly, on Indianapolis’s Indiana Avenue where Denver Fergusun ran numbers, paid-off cops, and operated the Sunset Terrace. It begins, maybe, in Houston where Don Robey was the proprietor of the Bronze Peacock, oversaw a network of bars and taverns throughout Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana, and was a founder of the seminal Peacock Records. Maybe it began in Memphis, home of W.C. Handy, Beale Street, and the Mitchell Hotel. Or maybe it was the multitude of juke joints that littered the American South from Texas to Florida, Georgia to Chicago, in the 1930s and 40s that afforded artists such as Walter Barnes, Louis Jordan, Little Richard, and Roy Brown a series of non-stop one-nighters to ply their raunchy jumped-up versions of swing and the blues to an insatiable audience of primarily African American men and women looking for good times. In the book Lauterbach details the Chitlin’ Circuit as it was, a network of promoters, clubs, radio stations, con-men, highways and, most importantly, musicians that supported an underground artistic economy and lifestyle just beneath the surface of the mainstream music industry; a network that gave birth to rock ‘n’ roll.

The Chitlin’ Circuit is Preston’s first book. He is currently working on his second, a hustler’s history of Beale Street.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jan 15 2013 · 59mins
Episode artwork

Preston Lauterbach, “The Chitlin’ Circuit and the Road to Rock ‘n’ Roll” (W. W. Norton, 2011)

Play
Read more

Where does rock ‘n’ roll begin?


In The Chitlin’ Circuit and the Road to Rock ‘n’ Roll (W. W. Norton, 2011), Preston Lauterbach makes a strong case for its beginnings in the backwoods and small-town juke joints, fed by big-city racketeering, of the black American South. It begins, possibly, on Indianapolis’s Indiana Avenue where Denver Fergusun ran numbers, paid-off cops, and operated the Sunset Terrace. It begins, maybe, in Houston where Don Robey was the proprietor of the Bronze Peacock, oversaw a network of bars and taverns throughout Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana, and was a founder of the seminal Peacock Records. Maybe it began in Memphis, home of W.C. Handy, Beale Street, and the Mitchell Hotel. Or maybe it was the multitude of juke joints that littered the American South from Texas to Florida, Georgia to Chicago, in the 1930s and 40s that afforded artists such as Walter Barnes, Louis Jordan, Little Richard, and Roy Brown a series of non-stop one-nighters to ply their raunchy jumped-up versions of swing and the blues to an insatiable audience of primarily African American men and women looking for good times. In the book Lauterbach details the Chitlin’ Circuit as it was, a network of promoters, clubs, radio stations, con-men, highways and, most importantly, musicians that supported an underground artistic economy and lifestyle just beneath the surface of the mainstream music industry; a network that gave birth to rock ‘n’ roll.

The Chitlin’ Circuit is Preston’s first book. He is currently working on his second, a hustler’s history of Beale Street.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jan 15 2013 · 59mins