OwlTail

Cover image of Claire Dederer

Claire Dederer

13 Podcast Episodes

Latest 1 May 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

Episode artwork

Women We Love: Claire Dederer

Everything is Fine

Join Tally and Kim as they chat with Claire Dederer, the author of the coming-of-middle-age memoir Love and Trouble, and an upcoming book about art created by bad men. We're talking about what a midlife crisis looks like for women, dealing with the encroaching darkness (yikes!), dancing while drunk, the importance of friendship above all else, and so much more.Our show's Instagram is @eifpodcast and you can find Kim on her blog Girls of a Certain Age.See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

38mins

13 Oct 2020

Episode artwork

124. Erica Barnett with Claire Dederer—Quitter: A Memoir of Drinking, Relapse, and Recover

Town Hall Seattle Arts & Culture Series

Award-winning reporter Erica Barnett her first sip of alcohol when she was thirteen. By her late twenties, her addiction became inescapable. By the time she was in her late thirties, she had run the gauntlet of alcoholism, and volatile relationships, blackouts, and unsuccessful stints in detox defined Barnett’s life. Barnett joins us via livestream, drawing from her book Quitter: A Memoir of Drinking, Relapse, and Recovery to share moments of her life along with essential new insights into addiction and treatment. In conversation with author Claire Dederer, Barnett expands on her personal story to confront the dire state of addiction in America. She tackles the rise of alcoholism in American women over the last century, and highlights the lack of rehabilitation options available to addicts. With startling frankness, she questions the efficacy of mottos touted by Alcoholics Anonymous and long-standing treatment ideas like “rock bottom,” arguing that you can always go lower than your lowest point. These words and programs did not reflect her experience and indeed she found them detrimental—an experience that made her wonder if the same was true for others who are struggling with addiction. Barnett considers whether these programs do enough to discover the root causes of addiction in the course of providing treatments. In a brave example of vulnerability, Barnett invites us to an intimate recollection of her own struggles with alcoholism, and offers a hopeful story of a hard-fought path to sobriety. Erica C. Barnett is an award-winning political reporter. She started her career at the Texas Observer, the venerable progressive magazine cofounded by Molly Ivins, and went on to work as a reporter and news editor for the Austin Chronicle, Seattle Weekly, and The Stranger. She now covers addiction, housing, poverty, and drug policy at her blog, The C Is for Crank. She has written for a variety of local and national publications, including The Huffington Post, Seattle Magazine, and Grist. Claire Dederer is a Seattle native and the author of two critically acclaimed memoirs, and a forthcoming nonfiction book investigating good art made by bad people. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Paris Review, The Atlantic, and many other publications. She is also an educator, having taught at Hugo House, the University of Washington, Pacific University, and other universities across the country. Buy the Book: https://www.elliottbaybook.com/book/9780525522324 Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To make a donation online click here, or text TOWN HALL to 44321.

58mins

2 Sep 2020

Similar People

Episode artwork

Episode 13 Bonus: An Extended Interview with Claire Dederer

Emerging Form

In this bonus episode, we talk with memoirist and essayist Claire Dederer about the role of ambition in a writer’s life. She also discusses the different ways she responds to rejection, and how it differs when it comes from a professional source versus from a reader. She also talks about the writer’s imperative to write about difficult subjects, why it’s important it is to have clarity and distance before sharing difficult personal stories, how domestic labor can affect a writer’s work life and how devoting time to her work has, at times, made her feel monstrous. Claire Dederer (photo courtesy Claire Dederer)Claire Dederer’s essay “What do we do with the Art of Monstrous Men?”Claire Dederer’s essay “Eclipsed: In our two-writer household, my husband's literary star shines all too brightly” This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at emergingform.substack.com/subscribe

28mins

19 Mar 2020

Episode artwork

Episode 13: How to Handle Rejection (with guest Claire Dederer)

Emerging Form

“We’re sorry, your work does not suit our needs at this time.” These words are so common. Rejection is a difficult reality for most (all?) writers and artists. So how do we handle rejection? Can we use it to improve our work? What does it have to tell us and teach us? In this episode, we talk about a useful phrase in the face of rejection, Christie’s Southeast Asia Problem, and one of the poetry worlds’ best rejection letter writers. Then we’ll talk with memoirist and essayist Claire Dederer and ask her two questions: 1) How do you process rejection, especially when it’s a work that feels very personal? And 2) What have you learned from rejection? We’re interested in your feedback on these answers, too! Episode Notes:Halcyon Poetry PrizeChristie’s article on mammography in Mother JonesChristie’s report for the Pulitzer Center on Agent Orange in VietnamColorado’s New Poet Laureate Bobby LeFebreMost Rejected Books of All TimeClaire Dederer (photo courtesy Claire Dederer)Claire Dederer’s essay “What do we do with the Art of Monstrous Men?”Claire Dederer’s essay “Eclipsed: In our two-writer household, my husband's literary star shines all too brightly”**Tim Green’s Outstanding Rejection Letter Dear Rosemerry— Thanks for sharing this. The subject matter is perfect for the series, but we receive over 100 poems every week, and I can only pick one (or occasionally two). This week I ended up choosing something else—check our website tomorrow morning to read it. This decision is, of course, no reflection on the importance of the event you were writing about, or of your response. It's great to read poets reacting in a meaningful way to current events, and very difficult to choose just one. I'm sorry that I can't reply individually, though many poems make me want to—reading all these every Saturday morning is a lot of work! We do have a closed Facebook group, where you can safely share your poems with each other, if you'd like—just join: https://www.facebook.com/groups/poetsrespond/Anyway, don't hesitate to try again whenever you have another timely one—or to send general submissions any time. Best, Tim This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at emergingform.substack.com/subscribe

36mins

12 Mar 2020

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Claire Dederer, LOVE & TROUBLE

Moms Don’t Have Time to Read Books

Claire Dederer is the author of two critically acclaimed memoirs, Love and Trouble: A Midlife Reckoning and Poser: My Life in Twenty-three Yoga Poses, which was a New York Times best seller and has been optioned for TV and adapted for the stage. We talked about her books and inspiration, the relationship between reader and writer, the importance of memoir from and for women and how to be a good interviewer!

30mins

5 Sep 2019

Episode artwork

2. Claire Dederer: Intellectual Dominance

BITCHCONOCLAST

In Episode 2, we talk to Claire Dederer about her new memoir Love & Trouble. "I would not have wanted my sexuality be born of molestation or victimhood, but now that I have it--like, what are you going to do with it? It's like a bricolage, right?  What are you going to make out of what you are given. And as a very sexual person, I made what I made."  Claire Dederer is the author of two critically acclaimed memoirs: Love & Trouble: A Midlife Reckoning and NYTimes Bestseller Poser: My Life in 23 Yoga Poses. Dederer is a long-time contributor to the New York Times. Her essays, criticism, and reviews have also appeared in The Atlantic, Harpers, The Nation, Vogue, New York Magazine, Slate, Salon, and many other publications. BITCHCONOCLAST is a podcast on sex, feminism, & power. In season one, we interview Pacific-Northwest authors Nicole Hardy, Claire Dederer, Elissa Washuta, Vanessa Veselka, Karen Karbo, and Suzanne Morrison, and to each other, about our work and the state of the patriarchy. Producers: Sonya Lea & Dylan Bandy Content editor: Dylan Bandy Sound editor: Nora Knight Illustration & Logo: Amy Mizrahi Graphics: Nicole Geslani & Bex Karnofski Music: Dylan Bandy, Adam Cohen-Leadholm, & Frankie Mars Gunner

42mins

9 Apr 2019

Episode artwork

Leslie Jamison and Claire Dederer Discuss 'The Recovering'

The Seattle Public Library - Author Readings and Library Events

From the New York Times bestselling author of "The Empathy Exams," a trans-formative work showing that sometimes the recovery is more gripping than the addiction. With its deeply personal and seamless blend of memoir, cultural history, literary criticism, and reportage, "The Recovering" turns our understanding of the traditional addiction narrative on its head, demonstrating that the story of recovery can be every bit as electrifying as the train wreck itself. All the while, Jamison offers a fascinating look at the larger history of the recovery movement, and at the complicated bearing that race and class have on our understanding of who is criminal and who is ill.At the heart of the book is Jamison's ongoing conversation with literary and artistic geniuses whose lives and works were shaped by alcoholism and substance dependence, including John Berryman, Jean Rhys, Billie Holiday, Raymond Carver, Denis Johnson, and David Foster Wallace, as well as brilliant lesser-known figures such as George Cain, lost to obscurity but newly illuminated here. Through its unvarnished relation of Jamison's own ordeals, The Recovering also becomes a book about a different kind of dependency: the way our desires can make us all, as she puts it, "broken spigots of need." It's about the particular loneliness of the human experience-the craving for love that both devours us and shapes who we are.For her striking language and piercing observations, Jamison has been compared to such iconic writers as Joan Didion and Susan Sontag, yet her utterly singular voice also offers something new. With enormous empathy and wisdom, Jamison has given us nothing less than the story of addiction and recovery in America writ large, a definitive and revelatory account that will resonate for years to come.Advance Praise for "The Recovering""Jamison turned heads with The Empathy Exams, her 2014 best-selling collection of insightful, Didionesque essays, and this new book, which blends her memoir of recovery with cultural history, can only add to her growing literary reputation."―Paul S. Makishima, The Boston GlobeLeslie Jamison is the author of the essay collection "The Empathy Exams," a New York Times bestseller, and the novel "The Gin Closet," a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Her work has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Harper's, and the Oxford American, among others, and she is a columnist for the New York Times Book Review. She teaches at Columbia University and lives in Brooklyn with her family.Claire Dederer is the author of two critically acclaimed memoirs: "Love and Trouble: A Midlife Reckoning" and "Poser: My Life in Twenty-Three Yoga Poses," which was a New York Times bestseller. Poser has been translated into 11 languages, optioned for television by Warner Bros., and adapted for the stage.

57mins

3 Jan 2019

Episode artwork

Episode 78: Love And Trouble, with Claire Dederer

Give and Take

My guest is Claire Dederer. Claire is the author of two critically acclaimed memoirs: Love and Trouble: A Midlife Reckoning and Poser: My Life in Twenty-Three Yoga Poses, which was a New York Times bestseller. Poser has been translated into 11 languages, optioned for television by Warner Bros., and adapted for the stage. Dederer is a long-time contributor to The New York Times. Her essays, criticism, and reviews have also appeared in The Atlantic, Harper’s, The Nation, Vogue, Chicago Tribune, Real Simple, Entertainment Weekly, New York magazine, Yoga Journal, Newsday, Slate, Salon, and many other publications. Her essays have appeared in numerous anthologies, most recently Labor Day. Dederer began her career as the chief film critic for Seattle Weekly. She has taught at Hugo House, the University of Washington, and many residencies, workshops, and conferences. Dederer served as writer-in-residence in the MFA program at Old Dominion University, and has been awarded a residency at Hedgebrook, where she also taught the Master Class in memoir. Dederer is a fourth-generation Seattle native. She lives on an island in Puget Sound with her husband, the writer Bruce Barcott, and their children.Special Guest: Claire Dederer.

1hr 8mins

25 Jan 2018

Episode artwork

78: Carolyn Murnick (THE HOT ONE) & Claire Dederer's LOVE AND TROUBLE

So Many Damn Books

Carolyn Murnick joins the guys in the Damn Library to discuss her memoir, The Hot One: a memoir of friendship, sex, and murder. Along with discussing that subtitle and the cover, the trio discuss Pop Culture's helpfulness in navigating murder and courtrooms, as well as whether we had that friend that went down a path we couldn't follow. Claire Dederer's Love and Trouble: a Midlife Reckoning is also on the table which prompts the question: how do you interact with authors whose lives you know intimately before you've actually said hello? 15 seconds of a song: The Blow - True Affection contribute! patreon.com/smdb for book lists, drink recipes, and more, visit somanydamnbooks.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

50mins

7 Nov 2017

Episode artwork

First Draft - Claire Dederer

Aspen Public Radio Past Productions

Claire Dederer is the author of two critically acclaimed memoirs: Love and Trouble: A Midlife Reckoning and Poser: My Life in Twenty-Three Yoga Poses, which was a New York Times bestseller.

33mins

24 Jul 2017

Loading