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Grant Baldwin

79 Podcast Episodes

Latest 18 Sep 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Grant Baldwin on Speaking From The Stage: Business Development At Scale

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Audio Edition

Grant Baldwin shares how getting booked and paid to speak not only positions you as the authority in your space, it can help you create and deepen relationships with potentially hundreds or thousands of your ideal clients all at the same time. Learn how to create and close more deals from the stage, how to set up a system that puts your follow-up process on autopilot, and how to fill your pipeline for years to come. Mo asks Grant Baldwin: What’s your big idea on how to get better at business development? Public speaking is the key and because of Covid, there is even more opportunity for virtual speaking. One of the major benefits of public speaking is that you get real-time feedback from the audience. Like a business idea, a presentation is an educated guess, and getting feedback is crucial. You can see people responding directly to what you’re saying and you get immediate feedback that can help you refine your message and idea. Speaking also builds rapport and connection with people in a way that isn’t possible via an email or blog post. Speaking is no different than any other service-based business and the human connection plays a major part in that. Many people try to overcomplicate speaking or think that they need to be famous in order to speak, but as speakers you are simply in the problem solving business. In the corporate world, speaking is a form of lead generation. From a speaking stand point, you become the authority on what you talk about and it can generate a lot of business for you at the same time. Speaking is flexible and you get to decide how it fits into your business. It can be a full-time effort or just a few times a year, it’s up to you. If you are an account manager, speaking will help you better understand the challenges that your audience/clients are experiencing. You can use that information to become better at what you do. You can use speaking as a marketing engine as well as for getting into the weeds with your clients and understanding their problems on a deeper level. Speaking can also give you the confidence to take on more responsibility within your organization. Mo asks Grant Baldwin: How can people use public speaking to create and close deals? As speakers, we have to realize that we are in the problem solving business. The audience doesn’t care about whether you are passionate about your topic, they want to know why what you are saying matters and what it means to them. Be very clear about what actual problem you are solving for your audience. The more specific, narrow, and clear you can be, the easier it is to book gigs. One of the most common mistakes is speaking to everyone about everything. We need to hone down our message and narrow our focus. By doing one thing really well, you’re more likely to attract the right clients and the right audience. As speakers, one of the best things you can do to build your business is to be really clear about solving one specific problem for one specific audience. The other key is learning where your ideal audience gathers. All over the world, there are natural gathering points for the people that are your ideal clients. The first thing you should do is to begin building relationships with the organizers of those spaces. Conferences and trade shows are already interested in finding speakers for those events,so getting an audience with them is an easy way to get your foot in the door. Another possible avenue is to organize your own event. For many audiences, there is no existing gathering point so creating your own event is a great way to fill a room and give a speech directly to the people you want to speak to. Virtual events are another great option, especially as people become more comfortable with the technology involved, and they can be put together more spontaneously than an in-person event. Events don’t have to be large to be valuable. Small local events are a good resource too. Event planners are in the risk mitigation business so there has to be a high level of trust in the the speakers they hire. One of the best ways to create that experience with you as a speaker is to invite people to your presentations and create a mixed audience of clients and prospects. Mo asks Grant Baldwin: How can we use speaking to deepen relationships? One of the best things about speaking is that oftentimes it’s an in-person human experience. People do business with those they know, like, and trust, and there’s no better way for that than meeting someone in person at a conference or an event, especially if you’re a speaker who is seen as an authority. Speaking at an event gives the audience a sense of who you are, and whether they can trust you to connect with their people. It’s a way to build the camaraderie and rapport that leads to future business. Being a speaker at an event changes the way people think about you. Your perceived value and reputation skyrockets after speaking and you’re assigned a certain level of authority that’s hard to replicate in other ways. Being a speaker also gives you the opportunity to get to know other speakers. Speaking gigs don’t always result in commercial opportunities right away; sometimes they are a means of connecting to other speaking opportunities. You never know who will be in the audience and what that relationship could turn into. Part of being a speaker is planting a lot of different seeds with a large number of people. Being a speaker is a long-term business and you can find opportunities by being persistent, following up, and just constantly showing up. Mo asks Grant Baldwin: How can we hack our habits to keep focusing on the long-term and stay top-of-mind? Speaking is a person-to-person business. One of the keys to success as a speaker is regularly following up with past events or with events that you would like to speak at. There is a consistent turnover each year as event organizers look for new voices and little touch points over the course of a few years will help you stay top-of-mind when they begin the process of looking for their next speaker. The more times someone is exposed to you and what you do, the more likely they are to feel familiar with you and take you up on your offer. To organize your follow-up efforts you need to have a system. This could be in the form of a spreadsheet or a CRM, but it can’t just be in your head. Pre-schedule your follow-up tasks months into the future, that way your only day-to-day task will be to check your CRM and see what you need to do in terms of follow-up for that day. One of the most important things you can do as a speaker is have a system in place to help you be responsible in your follow-up. When you do follow up after promising to do so, you’re giving the person a taste of what it is like to work with you. People want to do business with people who make their life easy. In terms of tasks and time, Grant checks his CRM (currently Hubspot, but the software isn’t as important as the system) each day and then executes on that follow-up task first. These follow-up tasks also give him a high level view of the leads in his pipeline which allows him to plan ahead. Like a flywheel, you have to keep putting energy and effort into your business or at some point it’s going to stop. You need to put in a little bit of work each day to keep your business going. Build in the time now or it’s going to be 100 times harder to get things going again in six months when you run out of work. Mo shares his insights from the habits of Grant Baldwin. Speaking is an incredible way to simultaneously create and close business at the same time, either by going to where your ideal client already gathers or by organizing your own event. Both methods work well. If you’re trying to land a speaking gig for a big event or conference, you usually have to start a year in advance. You need to figure out who the decision makers are and get your name in front of them before they start looking for speakers. Learn what themes they want to emphasize for the following year and get into a dialogue with them so you can show them you can deliver on what they want to accomplish. Ideally, you want to be able to show why your unique perspective will solve their problem. If you can stay top-of-mind while they are writing out what they are looking for in a speaker, you’re going to win far more often. If you do the work up front and help them shape where the event is going, it will greatly increase the odds of your success. If your ideal client tends not to gather in a specific space then putting your own conference together can create great results. The first step is to find one or two partners and then look to work together with a university or non-profit. If you can combine someone known for their knowledge, someone known for their technology, and someone known for their research, you can create an incredible brand for your conference. This kind of event creates an incredible level of collaboration between you and your partners as well as for the people attending. Sometimes it’s best to start with a small, intimate group instead of a grand-scale event. When you’re speaking, you’re building a relationship with your audience at scale. There is a major difference between delivering a talk on your own and delivering it with a client. Not only is it an incredible relationship-building experience with that client, you are also able to change the mindset and expectation of the audience at the same time. One of the biggest benefits of speaking is the scale and efficiency of each presentation. Make your talk about whatever you would talk about in a one-on-one conversation. Don’t let the organizer determine the topic completely. Instead find win/wins that meet in the middle. People do what they rehearse in their mind. Ideally, you want people in your audience identifying with the stories you’re telling on the stage. At some point in the conversation, you make the next step as easy as possible. The goal is to have a speech that actually converts into a conversation with the people you want to talk to, either by making the offer directly in the presentation or by offering a more in-depth one-to-one discussion. Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com thespeakerlab.com

1hr 23mins

8 May 2021

Episode artwork

Grant Baldwin on Speaking From The Stage: Business Development At Scale

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition

Grant Baldwin shares how getting booked and paid to speak not only positions you as the authority in your space, it can help you create and deepen relationships with potentially hundreds or thousands of your ideal clients all at the same time. Learn how to create and close more deals from the stage, how to set up a system that puts your follow-up process on autopilot, and how to fill your pipeline for years to come. Mo asks Grant Baldwin: What’s your big idea on how to get better at business development? Public speaking is the key and because of Covid, there is even more opportunity for virtual speaking. One of the major benefits of public speaking is that you get real-time feedback from the audience. Like a business idea, a presentation is an educated guess, and getting feedback is crucial. You can see people responding directly to what you’re saying and you get immediate feedback that can help you refine your message and idea. Speaking also builds rapport and connection with people in a way that isn’t possible via an email or blog post. Speaking is no different than any other service-based business and the human connection plays a major part in that. Many people try to overcomplicate speaking or think that they need to be famous in order to speak, but as speakers you are simply in the problem solving business. In the corporate world, speaking is a form of lead generation. From a speaking stand point, you become the authority on what you talk about and it can generate a lot of business for you at the same time. Speaking is flexible and you get to decide how it fits into your business. It can be a full-time effort or just a few times a year, it’s up to you. If you are an account manager, speaking will help you better understand the challenges that your audience/clients are experiencing. You can use that information to become better at what you do. You can use speaking as a marketing engine as well as for getting into the weeds with your clients and understanding their problems on a deeper level. Speaking can also give you the confidence to take on more responsibility within your organization. Mo asks Grant Baldwin: How can people use public speaking to create and close deals? As speakers, we have to realize that we are in the problem solving business. The audience doesn’t care about whether you are passionate about your topic, they want to know why what you are saying matters and what it means to them. Be very clear about what actual problem you are solving for your audience. The more specific, narrow, and clear you can be, the easier it is to book gigs. One of the most common mistakes is speaking to everyone about everything. We need to hone down our message and narrow our focus. By doing one thing really well, you’re more likely to attract the right clients and the right audience. As speakers, one of the best things you can do to build your business is to be really clear about solving one specific problem for one specific audience. The other key is learning where your ideal audience gathers. All over the world, there are natural gathering points for the people that are your ideal clients. The first thing you should do is to begin building relationships with the organizers of those spaces. Conferences and trade shows are already interested in finding speakers for those events,so getting an audience with them is an easy way to get your foot in the door. Another possible avenue is to organize your own event. For many audiences, there is no existing gathering point so creating your own event is a great way to fill a room and give a speech directly to the people you want to speak to. Virtual events are another great option, especially as people become more comfortable with the technology involved, and they can be put together more spontaneously than an in-person event. Events don’t have to be large to be valuable. Small local events are a good resource too. Event planners are in the risk mitigation business so there has to be a high level of trust in the the speakers they hire. One of the best ways to create that experience with you as a speaker is to invite people to your presentations and create a mixed audience of clients and prospects. Mo asks Grant Baldwin: How can we use speaking to deepen relationships? One of the best things about speaking is that oftentimes it’s an in-person human experience. People do business with those they know, like, and trust, and there’s no better way for that than meeting someone in person at a conference or an event, especially if you’re a speaker who is seen as an authority. Speaking at an event gives the audience a sense of who you are, and whether they can trust you to connect with their people. It’s a way to build the camaraderie and rapport that leads to future business. Being a speaker at an event changes the way people think about you. Your perceived value and reputation skyrockets after speaking and you’re assigned a certain level of authority that’s hard to replicate in other ways. Being a speaker also gives you the opportunity to get to know other speakers. Speaking gigs don’t always result in commercial opportunities right away; sometimes they are a means of connecting to other speaking opportunities. You never know who will be in the audience and what that relationship could turn into. Part of being a speaker is planting a lot of different seeds with a large number of people. Being a speaker is a long-term business and you can find opportunities by being persistent, following up, and just constantly showing up. Mo asks Grant Baldwin: How can we hack our habits to keep focusing on the long-term and stay top-of-mind? Speaking is a person-to-person business. One of the keys to success as a speaker is regularly following up with past events or with events that you would like to speak at. There is a consistent turnover each year as event organizers look for new voices and little touch points over the course of a few years will help you stay top-of-mind when they begin the process of looking for their next speaker. The more times someone is exposed to you and what you do, the more likely they are to feel familiar with you and take you up on your offer. To organize your follow-up efforts you need to have a system. This could be in the form of a spreadsheet or a CRM, but it can’t just be in your head. Pre-schedule your follow-up tasks months into the future, that way your only day-to-day task will be to check your CRM and see what you need to do in terms of follow-up for that day. One of the most important things you can do as a speaker is have a system in place to help you be responsible in your follow-up. When you do follow up after promising to do so, you’re giving the person a taste of what it is like to work with you. People want to do business with people who make their life easy. In terms of tasks and time, Grant checks his CRM (currently Hubspot, but the software isn’t as important as the system) each day and then executes on that follow-up task first. These follow-up tasks also give him a high level view of the leads in his pipeline which allows him to plan ahead. Like a flywheel, you have to keep putting energy and effort into your business or at some point it’s going to stop. You need to put in a little bit of work each day to keep your business going. Build in the time now or it’s going to be 100 times harder to get things going again in six months when you run out of work. Mo shares his insights from the habits of Grant Baldwin. Speaking is an incredible way to simultaneously create and close business at the same time, either by going to where your ideal client already gathers or by organizing your own event. Both methods work well. If you’re trying to land a speaking gig for a big event or conference, you usually have to start a year in advance. You need to figure out who the decision makers are and get your name in front of them before they start looking for speakers. Learn what themes they want to emphasize for the following year and get into a dialogue with them so you can show them you can deliver on what they want to accomplish. Ideally, you want to be able to show why your unique perspective will solve their problem. If you can stay top-of-mind while they are writing out what they are looking for in a speaker, you’re going to win far more often. If you do the work up front and help them shape where the event is going, it will greatly increase the odds of your success. If your ideal client tends not to gather in a specific space then putting your own conference together can create great results. The first step is to find one or two partners and then look to work together with a university or non-profit. If you can combine someone known for their knowledge, someone known for their technology, and someone known for their research, you can create an incredible brand for your conference. This kind of event creates an incredible level of collaboration between you and your partners as well as for the people attending. Sometimes it’s best to start with a small, intimate group instead of a grand-scale event. When you’re speaking, you’re building a relationship with your audience at scale. There is a major difference between delivering a talk on your own and delivering it with a client. Not only is it an incredible relationship-building experience with that client, you are also able to change the mindset and expectation of the audience at the same time. One of the biggest benefits of speaking is the scale and efficiency of each presentation. Make your talk about whatever you would talk about in a one-on-one conversation. Don’t let the organizer determine the topic completely. Instead find win/wins that meet in the middle. People do what they rehearse in their mind. Ideally, you want people in your audience identifying with the stories you’re telling on the stage. At some point in the conversation, you make the next step as easy as possible. The goal is to have a speech that actually converts into a conversation with the people you want to talk to, either by making the offer directly in the presentation or by offering a more in-depth one-to-one discussion. Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com thespeakerlab.com

1hr 23mins

8 May 2021

Similar People

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The Top 3 Things You Need to Implement from Grant Baldwin, Creator of The Speaker Lab

Real Relationships Real Revenue - Video Edition

Mo shares his insights from the habits of Grant Baldwin. Speaking is an incredible way to simultaneously create and close business at the same time, either by going to where your ideal client already gathers or by organizing your own event. Both methods work well. If you’re trying to land a speaking gig for a big event or conference, you usually have to start a year in advance. You need to figure out who the decision makers are and get your name in front of them before they start looking for speakers. Learn what themes they want to emphasize for the following year and get into a dialogue with them so you can show them you can deliver on what they want to accomplish. Ideally, you want to be able to show why your unique perspective will solve their problem. If you can stay top-of-mind while they are writing out what they are looking for in a speaker, you’re going to win far more often. If you do the work up front and help them shape where the event is going, it will greatly increase the odds of your success. If your ideal client tends not to gather in a specific space then putting your own conference together can create great results. The first step is to find one or two partners and then look to work together with a university or non-profit. If you can combine someone known for their knowledge, someone known for their technology, and someone known for their research, you can create an incredible brand for your conference. This kind of event creates an incredible level of collaboration between you and your partners as well as for the people attending. Sometimes it’s best to start with a small, intimate group instead of a grand-scale event. When you’re speaking, you’re building a relationship with your audience at scale. There is a major difference between delivering a talk on your own and delivering it with a client. Not only is it an incredible relationship-building experience with that client, you are also able to change the mindset and expectation of the audience at the same time. One of the biggest benefits of speaking is the scale and efficiency of each presentation. Make your talk about whatever you would talk about in a one-on-one conversation. Don’t let the organizer determine the topic completely. Instead find win/wins that meet in the middle. People do what they rehearse in their mind. Ideally, you want people in your audience identifying with the stories you’re telling on the stage. At some point in the conversation, you make the next step as easy as possible. The goal is to have a speech that actually converts into a conversation with the people you want to talk to, either by making the offer directly in the presentation or by offering a more in-depth one-to-one discussion. Mentioned in this Episode: GrowBIGPlaybook.com thespeakerlab.com

25mins

7 May 2021

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458# How To Get Booked & Paid To Speak (even during COVID) - Grant Baldwin

Awaken Your Alpha with Adam Lewis Walker

This episode is about how to get booked and paid to speak (even during COVID). Grant Baldwin is the founder of The Speaker Lab and Author of The Successful Speaker. He has earned over $2 million from 500+ paid engagements all over the world and has done everything from closed-door workshops to keynotes in front of 13,000 people. Grant has actually practiced what he teaches and we talk about the methods he used to build his speaking career and help thousands of students do the same. Grant started from scratch with no audience or major following and you can too. The #1 Mens Development Podcast for Tales & Tactics To Thrive! Watch Adam's "Awaken Your Alpha" TEDx Talk here: www.bit.ly/TEDxALW The podcast is now also a bestselling book! TALES & TACTICS TO THRIVE www.AYAlpha.com/book Get all the resources from each shows spotlighted guest, get your support and your questions answered. Connect across social media @AwakenYourAlpha @AdamLewisWalker to join the conversation.

32mins

25 Mar 2021

Most Popular

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Ep. 336 - Using Speaking to Grow Your Business (feat. Grant Baldwin)

Cody Builds a Business

Today we chat with Grant Baldwin (recurring guest!) on how to use speaking to grow your business. The world has changed and there are now actually more opportunities for speakers to share their message.  Less travel time means more opportunities for gatherings of people to hear what you have to say. Links:  http://grantbaldwin.com/ https://www.laidbacklaunch.com 

36mins

12 Mar 2021

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79. Get Started and Get Booked as a Speaker in 2021 with Grant Baldwin from The Speaker Lab

Inside The Greenroom | AYR

Give a big warm welcome to owner, speaker, and coach at The Speaker lab, Grant Baldwin Inside The Greenroom!  Today we are taking time to serve our listeners who are new to the speaking game. Or, as we like to call you, “the best-kept secret.” It is crazy to say that we are wrapping up the first month of 2021. It has been a wild and unpredictable year already… Despite the ever-changing world around us, we believe that there are a few things you can still predict in this life. One of them is your success as a speaker.  In this episode, Grant gives some incredible insight into how you can practically upgrade your speaking career behind the scenes, establishing yourself as an expert in your niche and create a foundation that will set you up for long term success.  Learn about the S.P.E.A.K. method, what event and meeting planners are looking for, the two questions every audience wants answered, and how you can start making money with every gig.  P.S. Of course, we didn’t forget about our event and Meeting Planners! Hear Grant’s best advice on working with speakers and how you can take your event to the next level!  Jump into 2021 with the confidence you need! Listen now.  Here’s More Of What We Cover: How customizing your speaking career can open doors The method that helps Grant’s clients start speaking professionally How Grant pivoted AND helped his clients pivot during the pandemic Why you should establish yourself as the expert Building a foundation that books you gigs How to acquire paid speaking gigs How to establish yourself as the expert The two questions every audience wants to know Why you should have a professional-grade website How you can create the Demo video that’s right for YOU When you should speak for free How to know when to scale your business How the industry has changed since 2020 The most important thing you can do as a meeting planner And much more! LINKS: Connect with Grant: Website: thespeakerlab.com Podcast: The Speakers lab Podcast  Calculator: myspeakerfee.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/grantbaldwin  Twitter: twitter.com/grantbaldwin Insta: www.instagram.com/getpaidtospeak/?hl=en  LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/grant-baldwin-641a03105/  Company Name:  The Speaker Lab YouTube: www.youtube.com/thespeakerlab Connect with Blair: blair@advanceyourreach.com  Connect with us: Facebook: ​​www.facebook.com/advanceyourreach Website:​​ advanceyourreach.com Email​: ​info@insidethegreenroompodcast.com Learn More About our Stage Agency:  https://elitespeakersagency.com/ stageagency@advancyourreach.com Influential Speakers in Grant’s life:  Josh Shipp Episode Minute By Minute: 0:27 Episode starts 0:55 Welcome Grant 1:19 How Grant got started in the speaking industry 5:40 A look inside Grant’s speaker framework 13:54 Putting in the reps to nail your speech 15:47 So what, now what? 19:13 The importance of having a good website 25:57 Key mistake to avoid when making your sizzle reel 28:15 Tips on every speaking gig 32:32 Grants best advice for scaling  36:08 The “best” speaking style 38:16 Get paid what your worth on virtual stages 44:47 The importance of building relationships as a speaker 47:51 We are all figuring it out right now 51:13 The speakers who have impacted Grant’s life the most More About Grant: Grant Baldwin is the author of “The Successful Speaker” and founder of TheSpeakerLab.com, a training company for public speakers. He is also the creator and host of The Speaker Lab podcast and has coached thousands of speakers. He has been regularly featured in the national media included Forbes, Inc., Entrepreneur and the Huffington Post. He lives near Nashville, Tennessee with his wife and three daughters.

54mins

21 Jan 2021

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5 Steps to Be A Public Speaker with Grant Baldwin

Successfully Unemployed Show with Entrepreneurs Investors and Side Hustle

Public speaking doesn’t have to be hard. Everyone can do it and Grant Baldwin shows us how to do it in 5 Steps and how you can become successfully unemployed public speaking.Get the best selling book "How to quit your job with Passive Income" for FREE: https://masterpassiveincome.com/freecoursesuLearn even more at the show notes page: https://successfullyunemployed.co/64Youtube Channel: https://successfullyunemployed.co/youtube// WHAT TO WATCH NEXTStart a Podcast: https://youtu.be/YdKKwSSOnJAMake Money Online: https://youtu.be/WDkRHg3uxR0Flea Market Flipper: https://youtu.be/MYEoeQPT-5E//BEST BUSINESS COURSES I RECOMMENDStart an Online Business: https://successfullyunemployed.co/p24Start a podcast: https://successfullyunemployed.co/podcourseMake money on Etsy: https://successfullyunemployed.co/goldcityCreate a Facebook Ads Agency: https://successfullyunemployed.co/laptopempiresMake $ from nothing as a Flea Market Flipper: https://successfullyunemployed.co/fleamarketflipperLearn how to invest in land: https://successfullyunemployed.co/retipster//OTHER RESOURCES:Bank I use: https://successfullyunemployed.co/bankWebsite hosting I use: https://successfullyunemployed.co/sitegroundMembership Tools I Use for My Online Business: https://successfullyunemployed.co/kartraNOTE: This description may contains affiliate links to products we enjoy using ourselves. Should you choose to use these links, this channel may earn affiliate commissions at no additional cost to you. We appreciate your support!

44mins

2 Nov 2020

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#141 How to get booked and paid to speak with Grant Baldwin

The Unconventionalists with Mark Leruste

Today's guest on The Unconventionalists podcast is Grant Baldwin, creator of The Speaker Lab and author of The Successful Speaker who generated $2million in speaker fees as a professional public speaker.   Grant and his team are on a mission to empower thousands of speakers around the world to get booked and paid to speak, be it on stages or online.   In this first special episode of "In Between Seasons", we dive into the most common mistakes budding speakers make when trying to land speaking gigs.   We also dive into the reality of growing a business from scratch and how that feeling of feast and famine never really goes away, no matter how big your company gets.   Grant shares some personal anecdotes and opens up about the reality of being in the business of speaking as well as shares his biggest wish for everyone listening. If you're looking for tips and help on how to find, book and get paid to speak, this episode is for you.   As always I'd love to hear your biggest takeaway and any follow up questions you might have. I can't wait to read them! To your impact, Mark -Founder & CEO at The Unconventionalists Shownotes: www.theunconventionalists.com/episode/141 This week’s episode was brought to you by: ●           Launch A Successful Podcast From Scratch (Online Masterclass):  https://theunconventionalists.com/launch-a-successful-podcast-from-scratch - Use code "PODCASTTRIBE" to get 20% off the entire course.

42mins

25 Oct 2020

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S04 E015: Grant Baldwin on how to Make Money as a Speaker

Word Made Digital

S04 E015: Grant Baldwin on how to Make Money as a SpeakerGrant started out in pastoral work, and began to realize how many people were asking him how to build a speaking platform. So he began The Speaker Lab to train and equip others in not only how to speak, but how to make a career out of being a speaker.We bring you this conversation today because so many listeners want to grow their speaking platform into a full or part time part of their income. Grant has lots to say on this topic- and even how to do so during a pandemic like we're experiencing now with many live events being cancelled.Grant Baldwin: thespeakerlab.com and @gbaldwinJoanna la Fleur: @joannalafleur and www.joannalafleur.com. Email: hello@joannalafleur.comJoin the Digital Church Facebook Group: facebook.com/groups/wordmadedigital/ Want to say thanks? Buy me a coffee: buymeacoffee.com/joannalafleur My other Podcast- short, practical, daily episodes on Church Media and Communications: thefuture.churchThanks to our Season 4 Partners:Compassion Canada: www.compassion.com/covid Wycliffe College: wycliffecollege.ca/wordmadedigital

56mins

9 Sep 2020

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How to Land Speaking Engagements with Grant Baldwin

Creating a Brand

Many entrepreneurs wonder how to land speaking engagements; especially paid speaking gigs! In this episode, we cover 4 steps for becoming a successful public speaker.In this episode, Alex Sanfilippo talks with Grant Baldwin about his book The Successful Speaker and how to land speaking engagements!They discuss the acronym S.P.E.A.K. S – Select a problem to solve.P – Prepare your talk. E – Establish yourself as the expert.A – Acquire paid speaking gigs.K – Know when to scale. For full show notes visit: https://creatingabrand.com/063

26mins

8 Sep 2020

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