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25 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Claudia Rankine. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Claudia Rankine, often where they are interviewed.

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25 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Claudia Rankine. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Claudia Rankine, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

Episode #103 Don't Let Me Be Lonely - Claudia Rankine

Close Talking: A Poetry Podcast
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In this episode, Connor and Jack explore an excerpt from Claudia Rankine's book Don't Let Me Be Lonely. They discuss how the poem conveys the toll of anti-Blackness on the psyche of Black Americans, "hope" and electoral politics, the brilliant use of "flat prose," and listen to the voices and sounds of The Staples, Cornel West, George W. Bush, and Kanye West.

More on Rankine here: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/claudia-rankine
Read the poem here: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/57804/dont-let-me-be-lonely-cornel-west-makes-the-point

from Don't Let Me Be Lonely
By: Claudia Rankine

Cornel West makes the point that hope is different from American optimism. After the initial presidential election results come in, I stop watching the news. I want to continue watching, charting, and discussing the counts, the recounts, the hand counts, but I can­not. I lose hope. However Bush came to have won, he would still be winning ten days later and we would still be in the throes of our American optimism. All the non-reporting is a distraction from Bush himself, the same Bush who can't remember if two or three people were convicted for dragging a black man to his death in his home state of Texas.

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You don't remember because you don't care. Some­times my mother's voice swells and fills my forehead. Mostly I resist the flooding, but in Bush's case I find myself talking to the television screen: You don't know because you don't care.

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Then, like all things impassioned, this voice takes on a life of its own: You don't know because you don't bloody care. Do you?

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I forget things too. It makes me sad. Or it makes me the saddest. The sadness is not really about George W. or our American optimism; the sadness lives in the recog­nition that a life can not matter. Or, as there are billions of lives, my sadness is alive alongside the recognition that billions of lives never mattered. I write this with­out breaking my heart, without bursting into anything. Perhaps this is the real source of my sadness. Or, per­haps, Emily Dickinson, my love, hope was never a thing with feathers. I don't know, I just find when the news comes on I switch the channel. This new ten­dency might be indicative of a deepening personality flaw: IMH, The Inability to Maintain Hope, which trans­lates into no innate trust in the supreme laws that gov­ern us. Cornel West says this is what is wrong with black people today—too nihilistic. Too scarred by hope to hope, too experienced to experience, too close to dead is what I think.

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You can always send us an e-mail with thoughts on this or any of our previous podcasts, as well as suggestions for future shows, at closetalkingpoetry@gmail.com.

Jul 10 2020

47mins

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Nick Hornby et Claudia Rankine - Entrez sans frapper - 25/06/2020

Entrez sans frapper
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Le double "Boing Boum Tchak" de Sébastien Ministru : "Un mariage en dix actes" de Nick Hornby (Stock) et "Citizen. Ballade américaine" de Claudia Rankine (Éditions de l'Olivier).

"Un mariage en dix actes" :
Chaque semaine, Tom et Louise se retrouvent dans un pub londonien dix minutes avant leur session de thérapie de couple. Le choix du pub n'a rien d'anodin : il offre une vue imprenable sur la porte de la thérapeute et leur permet d'observer et de commenter allègrement les allées et venues des autres patients. Quarantenaires, mariés depuis des années, Tom et Louise pensaient leur couple stable et leur vie familiale sans vague... jusqu'à ce qu'un léger incident de parcours précipite le couple au bord de l'implosion. D'où leur décision de consulter, mais était-ce vraiment une bonne idée ? Autour d'un verre - ou deux - Tom et Louise n'esquivent aucun sujet (le mariage, le sexe, les enfants, la politique, le Brexit, le politiquement correct...) et rejouent en dix actes leur vie conjugale, faisant apparaître, avec humour et vivacité, les fissures de leur relation.

"Citizen. Ballade américaine" :
" À terre. À terre tout de suite. J'ai dû aller trop vite. Non, tu n'allais pas trop vite. Je n'allais pas trop vite ? Tu n'as rien fait de mal. Alors pourquoi me contrôlez-vous ? Pourquoi suis-je contrôlé ? Fais voir tes mains. Les mains en l'air. Lève les mains. " L'attaque est préméditée, assumée, d'une violence intolérable. Ou bien c'est simplement la langue qui fourche sans qu'on s'en rende compte, et le racisme parle à travers notre bouche. Citizen est un livre sur les agressions racistes. Pour dire cette réalité, Claudia Rankine choisit une forme qui n'appartient qu'à elle : tour à tour poésie, récit ou pamphlet, Citizen décrit les expériences les plus intimes, les plus ténues pour y greffer ce que dépose en nous le flux de la vie quotidienne - propos saisis dans le métro, conversations, blagues, coupures de journaux, captures d'écran -, dans un vaste collage d'images et de voix. Une symphonie parfois dissonante où les mots les plus simples sont portés par une extraordinaire énergie poétique.

Jun 24 2020

7mins

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Weather by Claudia Rankine

Poetry Today W/ Steven Bravo
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Weather by Claudia Rankine

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This episode is sponsored by
· Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/steven-bravo---uncensored/support

Jun 22 2020

3mins

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New Letters On the Air Claudia Rankine

New Letters - On the Air - Audio feed
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A 2016 MacArthur "Genius" and a 2017 Guggenheim Fellow, Claudia Rankine discusses her fifth poetry book, Citizen: An American Lyric. This multi-award-winning work features poetry and prose along with art, ranging from contemporary pieces and William Turner's paintings of The Slave Ship and talks about her collaboration with he...

Jun 05 2020

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Ciudadana (Claudia Rankine, en la voz de Tamara Tenenbaum)

Orden de traslado
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El mundo se equivoca. No se puede dejar atrás el pasado. Lo llevás enterrado adentro tuyo; se hizo una alacena con tu carne. No todo lo que se recuerda sirve, pero el mundo te entrega todo eso para que te lo guardes. ¿Quién le hizo qué a quién, qué día? ¿Quién dijo eso? ¿Qué dijo ella? ¿Qué hizo él? ¿En serio dijo eso ella? ¿Y él que le dijo? ¿Y ella qué hizo? ¿Escuché lo que creo que escuché? ¿Eso acaba de salir de mi boca, de la de él, la tuya? ¿Te acordás que suspiraste?

Jun 03 2020

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Read By: Claudia Rankine

92Y's Read By
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Claudia Rankine on her selection:

This untitled poem, by the Peruvian poet César Vallejo, was written in November of 1937. He was living in Paris, having traveled back from Spain, and he was working on what would become the posthumous poems. He worked between September and December of that year and then fell ill and died in March of 1938.

The Complete Posthumous Poetry, trans. Clayton Eshleman and Jose Rubia Barcia

Music: "Shift of Currents" by Blue Dot Sessions // CC BY-NC 2.0

May 23 2020

4mins

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Episode 40: Citizen: An American Lyric by Claudia Rankine with Glauco Adorno

Dear Adam Silver
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On today's podcast, my dear friend Glauco Adorno and I discuss the book Citizen: An American Lyric by award winning poet, playwright, educator and multimedia artist Claudia Rankine. This book is a masterful unpacking of how racism exists in the United States. Rankine combines poetry, pros, found images and text to express a personal meditation on how the system of white supremacy functions in this country, both in obvious and subtle ways. Specifically, a a large portion of the book is focused on Serena Williams and the hateful and unjust treatment she has experienced from the professional tennis world based on the color of her skin. 

Glauco Adorno is a Brazilian curator and art historian based in Rio de Janeiro. We met each other during our time as graduate students at Louisiana State University. His website can be found here. On today's episode he also shares some of what his experience has been like during COVID-19 and how the virus is being handled in Brazil. He is also featured on episodes 3 and 25 of Dear Adam Silver. 

Claudia Rankine was born in Kingston, Jamaica in 1963 and received her BA from Williams College in 1986 and her MFA in poetry from Columbia Universit in 1993. She is currently the Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry at Yale University. Her website can be found here


If you are interested in listening to any lectures by Rankine, the links are listed below:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8cnq71TlUvo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cxU3MJmhzl0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-SNKU3T7iA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYa25y4EGec&t=780s

Apr 21 2020

1hr 49mins

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What Happened When Claudia Rankine Talked to White Men About Privilege

Beyond the Lecture
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Poet, playwright, and Yale University professor Claudia Rankine was at the American Academy in Berlin as a Distinguished Visitor in early November 2019, to deliver the John W. Kluge lecture. Academy producer Tony Andrews sat down with Rankine to discuss the various dynamics at work in the conversations she quotes in her forthcoming book, Just Us, a collection of essays that critically engages with the conversation as a racialized space.

Host: R. Jay Magill
Producer: Tony Andrews
Photo: Annette Hornischer

Dec 09 2019

51mins

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Episode 16 -- "You can shoot me now": White Saviors and the Art of Race in Claudia Rankine's THE WHITE CARD

The Drip
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In this episode, the Spoilers get to work talking about whiteness, representation, art, race, and the spectacle of black death. Sure, it sounds heavy, but the Spoilers bring all their serious thinking power as well as their decidedly enduring humor to bear in grappling with some of the most difficult social issues in play in our society today. For those of you out there thinking about how to have those difficult conversations around race, this episode is for you. And for those of you who haven't really considered the possibility, maybe this episode and Rankine's play are even more for you. The bottom line is, this is an episode in which we struggle and work together to move toward some kind of understanding of what Rankine's work is pushing us to understand. Our journey isn't completed in this episode, but we think it is a pretty good step in the right direction. (And we LOVE Claudia Rankine for brilliantly leading us down the path!)

Jun 15 2019

1hr

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Mary Oliver | Claudia Rankine | The Mayo House | Mia Zara and ‘No Candy’ | Julia Oldham

OPB's State of Wonder
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When the going gets tough (and we mean really, really tough) what pulls you back from the edge? For some folks, it’s revisiting a favorite poem; for others, it’s about finding something -- anything -- to laugh at, even when the circumstances are hardly humorous. From historic preservation to nuclear fallout, this week’s show proves there’s no one way to survive.

Jan 26 2019

50mins

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