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Adia Benton Podcasts

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9 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Adia Benton. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Adia Benton, often where they are interviewed.

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9 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Adia Benton. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Adia Benton, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Dr Adia Benton: Ebola To COVID-19, How Interventions Become A Way Of Life

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Dr. Adia Benton: Pandemics are not new to human civilization. In light of that certain lessons picked up from dealing with previous calamities and pandemics become part of the institutional memory and social fabric and can be successfully deployed to help tackle upcoming viruses.
Jun 09 2020 · 49mins
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EP #22 - 4/14/2020 - Let’s Talk Memorials!

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After September 11, New York City placed a memorial at Ground Zero as a tribute of remembrance. After the Sewol Ferry Disaster, the community pulled together a Memory Classroom as a testament to the lives that were so painfully cut short. Will there be a memorial to remember the lives lost and honor the heroes during the COVID-19 pandemic? Let’s talk memorials with Jay Aronson, the founder for the Center of Human Rights Science at Carnegie Mellon University, and Adia Benton, an associate professor of anthropology at Northwestern University. Their information can be found here: https://www.cmu.edu/chrs/people-partners/aronson.html and https://www.anthropology.northwestern.edu/people/faculty/adia-benton-.html.

Jun 01 2020 · 1hr 6mins
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Dig: Ebola in West Africa with Adia Benton

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Dan interviews anthropologist Adia Benton on the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa and what its politics reveal about the Covid-19 pandemic today.

Please support this podcast with your money at patreon.com/thdig

May 23 2020 ·
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Ebola in West Africa with Adia Benton

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Dan interviews anthropologist Adia Benton on the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa and what its politics reveal about the Covid-19 pandemic today.

Please support this podcast with your money at patreon.com/thdig
May 23 2020 · 1hr 19mins
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Episode 31.1: Adia Benton

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We're changing up our schedule and format a little to bring you some mini-episodes of short and sharp conversations with anthropologists around the themes of crisis and the digital. The first conversation is with Adia Benton, Associate Professor of Anthropology at Northwestern University. Adia is a cultural anthropologist with interests in global health, biomedicine, development and humanitarianism, and is the author of 'HIV Exceptionalism: Development through Disease in Sierra Leone' (University of Minnesota, 2015) and well as numerous articles. In the interview, Adia and Tim discuss the current COVID-19 pandemic, virality, relevance, and her article 'Ebola at a Distance: A Pathographic Account of Anthropology's Relevance' (Anthropological Quarterly, 90:2, 2017). Find more about Adia Benton at: https://ethnography911.org and https://twitter.com/ethnography911
Apr 30 2020 · 24mins
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Can’t Touch This: Anthropological Reflections on the Coronavirus Pandemic with Dr. Adia Benton

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Northwestern University researcher Dr. Adia Benton discussed topics central to the COVID-19 pandemic. She touched upon (1) what is and isn’t known about the virus and its transmission dynamics; (2) how scientific and public health expertise is brought to bear (or not) in calibrating recommendations at various levels of governance and responsibility; (3) alternative ways of framing our conversations about and approaches to ‘flattening the curve’ of infection in our communities.

This is Episode 1 of Northwestern Buffett Institute for Global Affairs "Confronting COVID-19: Global Implications and Futures" webinar series.

Mar 25 2020 · 57mins
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Ep 151: Transphobic legislation, NFL Free Agency Madness, and Dr. Adia Benton on Sports and COVID-19

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This week the gang’s all here with feelings of solidarity during the COVID-19 pandemic. We talk about the humor of social media in dark times. Then, we discuss the terrible legislation barring transathletes from participating in school sports [9:24] and suggest how to stop its passing. Jessica sits down with cultural anthropologist Dr. Adia Benton to discuss the impact of COVID-19 on sports [20:31]. Finally, it's Shireen's turn to lead us into our conversation on Tom Brady, Cam Newton, and NFL Free Agency [38:05].

Of course you’ll hear the Burn Pile [57:36], our Bad Ass Woman of the Week and what is good in our worlds.

To help support the Burn It All Down podcast, please consider becoming a patron: www.patreon.com/burnitalldown

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For more info check our website: www.burnitalldownpod.com
Find us on Twitter: twitter.com/BurnItDownPod; Facebook: www.facebook.com/BurnItAllDownPod/; and Instagram: www.instagram.com/burnitalldownpod/

Mar 25 2020 · 1hr 23mins
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Episode 2, Adia Benton: Can Diseases Be Exceptional?

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What does it mean for some diseases to be treated differently from others? Medical anthropologist Adia Benton discusses her work on Ebola and HIV -- and the possible application of these ideas to the Zika phenomenon.
Jul 05 2016 · 32mins
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Dr. Adia Benton on The West African Ebola Outbreak

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This week Point Of Inquiry welcomes Dr. Adia Benton, a professor of medical anthropology at Brown University. She joins host Lindsay Beyerstein to talk about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.Medical anthropologists bring a unique expertise to epidemics because they study both the physiology of illness and the cultural factors that influence its transmission. That's why the World Health Organization has deployed med anthros to combat prior Ebloa outbreaks. They ask questions like: "How do people think a disease is spread?," "What role do traditional healers play in this culture?," and "Do people trust Western medicine?" The answers can be used to craft more effective public health messages. 
These are urgent questions for the current Ebola outbreak, where some are resisting quarantine, attacking hospitals, and blaming the outbreak on doctors and nurses. In a crisis, culturally competent care can be a matter of life and death.
Aug 25 2014 · 39mins