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Matthew Williams

47 Podcast Episodes

Latest 3 Dec 2022 | Updated Daily

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Episode 1128 - Medal of Honor Recipient SGM Matthew Williams and Bert Kuntz

Drinkin‘ Bros Podcast

The Drinkin' Bros go live from a suite in FedEx field at the Washington Redskins game with Medal of Honor recipient Matthew Williams, Bert Kuntz, retired Lieutenant General John F. Mulholland Jr., and more.SUBSCRIBE to our Patreon for exclusive audio and video content!Buy Drinkin Bros' new HardAF Seltzer Here! Get your Drinkin' Bros Merch here!  Go to ghostbed.com/drinkinbros and use code DRINKINBROS for 30% off EVERYTHING (Mattresses, Adjustable Base, and more) -- plus a 101 Night Sleep Trial and Mattresses Made in the USA!Get 20% OFF @manscaped + Free Shipping with promo code DRINKINBROS at MANSCAPED.com! #ad #manscapedpodJust in time for deer season, EuroOptic is offering our listeners a discount on Vortex products! For the month of October, use code DB10 to save 10% on all regularly priced Vortex products! EuroOptic and Vortex are supporting us, so we ask you to support them, or at least let them know you’re listening by heading over to EuroOptic.com/DrinkinBrosRight now, get up to 55% off your subscription when you go to BABBEL.com/DRINKINBROS.Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brandsPrivacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

1hr 55mins

9 Nov 2022

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Algorithms of Hate with Matthew Williams

The Innovation Show

Are our brains wired to hate? Is social media to blame for an increase in hateful abuse? With hate on the rise, what can we do to turn the tide? Drawing on twenty years of pioneering research - as well as his own experience as a hate-crime victim - our guest, a world-renowned criminologist explores one of the pressing issues of our age. Today we discuss the role of big tech, algorithms and echo chambers. We welcome the author of The Science of Hate: How prejudice becomes hate and what we can do to stop it, Matthew Williams 00:01:18 Algorithms, “Tay” and the Internet Censorship 00:10:20 How Regulation Can Help 00:21:33 Bot Traffic, Fake Accounts 00:25:43 Facebook Influence in Myanmar 00:32:03 Trigger Events and Predictive Events 00:33:45 Wisdom of The Crowd 00:37:37 What to do when you see Hate Speech

40mins

7 Oct 2022

Similar People

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The Science of Hate with Matthew Williams

The Innovation Show

Are our brains wired to hate? Is social media to blame for an increase in hateful abuse? What can we do with hate on the rise to turn the tide? Drawing on twenty years of pioneering research - as well as his own experience as a hate-crime victim - our guest, a world-renowned criminologist explores one of the pressing issues of our age.
 We welcome the author of The Science of Hate: How prejudice becomes hate and what we can do to stop it, Professor Matt Williams Find Matt here: https://hatelab.net00:00:00 Intro 00:01:12 Matt’s Hate Crime Origin Story00:11:15 The Benefit of Criminology as an Intersectional Discipline00:16:12 Criminology is Based on a study of Prejudices00:26:35 Intergroup Hate, A Hierarchy of Hatred 00:34:29 Gordon Alport and Push v Pull Prejudice00:45:43 Statistics of Hate

1hr

3 Oct 2022

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Charles L. Chavis Jr., "The Silent Shore: The Lynching of Matthew Williams and the Politics of Racism in the Free State" (Johns Hopkins UP, 2022)

New Books in African American Studies

On December 4, 1931, a mob of white men in Salisbury, Maryland, lynched and set ablaze a twenty-three-year-old Black man named Matthew Williams. His gruesome murder was part of a wave of silent white terrorism in the wake of the stock market crash of 1929, which exposed Black laborers to white rage in response to economic anxieties. For nearly a century, the lynching of Matthew Williams has lived in the shadows of the more well-known incidents of racial terror in the deep South, haunting both the Eastern Shore and the state of Maryland as a whole. In The Silent Shore: The Lynching of Matthew Williams and the Politics of Racism in the Free State (Johns Hopkins UP, 2022), author Charles L. Chavis Jr. draws on his discovery of previously unreleased investigative documents to meticulously reconstruct the full story of one of the last lynchings in Maryland.Bringing the painful truth of anti-Black violence to light, Chavis breaks the silence that surrounded Williams's death. Though Maryland lacked the notoriety for racial violence of Alabama or Mississippi, he writes, it nonetheless was the site of at least 40 spectacle lynchings after the abolition of slavery in 1864. Families of lynching victims rarely obtained any form of actual justice, but Williams's death would have a curious afterlife: Maryland's politically ambitious governor Albert C. Ritchie would, in an attempt to position himself as a viable challenger to FDR, become one of the first governors in the United States to investigate the lynching death of a Black person. Ritchie tasked Patsy Johnson, a member of the Pinkerton detective agency and a former prizefighter, with going undercover in Salisbury and infiltrating the mob that murdered Williams. Johnson would eventually befriend a young local who admitted to participating in the lynching and who also named several local law enforcement officers as ringleaders. Despite this, a grand jury, after hearing 124 witness statements, declined to indict the perpetrators. But this denial of justice galvanized Governor Ritchie's Interracial Commission, which would become one of the pioneering forces in the early civil rights movement in Maryland.Complicating historical narratives associated with the history of lynching in the city of Salisbury, The Silent Shore explores the immediate and lingering effect of Williams's death on the politics of racism in the United States, the Black community in Salisbury, the broader Eastern Shore, the state of Maryland, and the legacy of "modern-day lynchings."Omari Averette-Phillips is a doctoral student in the department of history at UC Davis. He can be reached at okaverettephillips@ucdavis.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

40mins

22 Sep 2022

Most Popular

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Charles L. Chavis Jr., "The Silent Shore: The Lynching of Matthew Williams and the Politics of Racism in the Free State" (Johns Hopkins UP, 2022)

New Books in Law

On December 4, 1931, a mob of white men in Salisbury, Maryland, lynched and set ablaze a twenty-three-year-old Black man named Matthew Williams. His gruesome murder was part of a wave of silent white terrorism in the wake of the stock market crash of 1929, which exposed Black laborers to white rage in response to economic anxieties. For nearly a century, the lynching of Matthew Williams has lived in the shadows of the more well-known incidents of racial terror in the deep South, haunting both the Eastern Shore and the state of Maryland as a whole. In The Silent Shore: The Lynching of Matthew Williams and the Politics of Racism in the Free State (Johns Hopkins UP, 2022), author Charles L. Chavis Jr. draws on his discovery of previously unreleased investigative documents to meticulously reconstruct the full story of one of the last lynchings in Maryland.Bringing the painful truth of anti-Black violence to light, Chavis breaks the silence that surrounded Williams's death. Though Maryland lacked the notoriety for racial violence of Alabama or Mississippi, he writes, it nonetheless was the site of at least 40 spectacle lynchings after the abolition of slavery in 1864. Families of lynching victims rarely obtained any form of actual justice, but Williams's death would have a curious afterlife: Maryland's politically ambitious governor Albert C. Ritchie would, in an attempt to position himself as a viable challenger to FDR, become one of the first governors in the United States to investigate the lynching death of a Black person. Ritchie tasked Patsy Johnson, a member of the Pinkerton detective agency and a former prizefighter, with going undercover in Salisbury and infiltrating the mob that murdered Williams. Johnson would eventually befriend a young local who admitted to participating in the lynching and who also named several local law enforcement officers as ringleaders. Despite this, a grand jury, after hearing 124 witness statements, declined to indict the perpetrators. But this denial of justice galvanized Governor Ritchie's Interracial Commission, which would become one of the pioneering forces in the early civil rights movement in Maryland.Complicating historical narratives associated with the history of lynching in the city of Salisbury, The Silent Shore explores the immediate and lingering effect of Williams's death on the politics of racism in the United States, the Black community in Salisbury, the broader Eastern Shore, the state of Maryland, and the legacy of "modern-day lynchings."Omari Averette-Phillips is a doctoral student in the department of history at UC Davis. He can be reached at okaverettephillips@ucdavis.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

40mins

22 Sep 2022

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Charles L. Chavis Jr., "The Silent Shore: The Lynching of Matthew Williams and the Politics of Racism in the Free State" (Johns Hopkins UP, 2022)

New Books in History

On December 4, 1931, a mob of white men in Salisbury, Maryland, lynched and set ablaze a twenty-three-year-old Black man named Matthew Williams. His gruesome murder was part of a wave of silent white terrorism in the wake of the stock market crash of 1929, which exposed Black laborers to white rage in response to economic anxieties. For nearly a century, the lynching of Matthew Williams has lived in the shadows of the more well-known incidents of racial terror in the deep South, haunting both the Eastern Shore and the state of Maryland as a whole. In The Silent Shore: The Lynching of Matthew Williams and the Politics of Racism in the Free State (Johns Hopkins UP, 2022), author Charles L. Chavis Jr. draws on his discovery of previously unreleased investigative documents to meticulously reconstruct the full story of one of the last lynchings in Maryland.Bringing the painful truth of anti-Black violence to light, Chavis breaks the silence that surrounded Williams's death. Though Maryland lacked the notoriety for racial violence of Alabama or Mississippi, he writes, it nonetheless was the site of at least 40 spectacle lynchings after the abolition of slavery in 1864. Families of lynching victims rarely obtained any form of actual justice, but Williams's death would have a curious afterlife: Maryland's politically ambitious governor Albert C. Ritchie would, in an attempt to position himself as a viable challenger to FDR, become one of the first governors in the United States to investigate the lynching death of a Black person. Ritchie tasked Patsy Johnson, a member of the Pinkerton detective agency and a former prizefighter, with going undercover in Salisbury and infiltrating the mob that murdered Williams. Johnson would eventually befriend a young local who admitted to participating in the lynching and who also named several local law enforcement officers as ringleaders. Despite this, a grand jury, after hearing 124 witness statements, declined to indict the perpetrators. But this denial of justice galvanized Governor Ritchie's Interracial Commission, which would become one of the pioneering forces in the early civil rights movement in Maryland.Complicating historical narratives associated with the history of lynching in the city of Salisbury, The Silent Shore explores the immediate and lingering effect of Williams's death on the politics of racism in the United States, the Black community in Salisbury, the broader Eastern Shore, the state of Maryland, and the legacy of "modern-day lynchings."Omari Averette-Phillips is a doctoral student in the department of history at UC Davis. He can be reached at okaverettephillips@ucdavis.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

40mins

22 Sep 2022

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How to rewrite the story of your life with author and life coach Matthew Williams

The Mindful Writer

Each week I chat with a guest exploring the psychological, emotional, and spiritual journey they have experienced as a writer, the lessons they have learnt – and are continuing to learn.   As I talk to other writer’s and reflect on my own experience, I hope to discover how we might find abundance in our creative pursuits, achieving our goals the mindful way. In this eight episode of The Mindful Writer Author and Life coach Matthew Williams tells me how he wrote himself out of what he describes as a shit place to write himself a better life story. Although Matthew hit rock bottom in his personal life he used this experience to create something amazing. Matthew Williams is an author, public speaker, and life coach. In this episode he tells me:How writing took him from a 'shit place' to achieving remarkable thingsHow you can change the story of your life by taking control of the pen.Music: Motivational-indent/Pixabay

28mins

10 Aug 2022

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#001 Computational Oncology - Dr Matthew Williams

The Computational Medicine Podcast

Dr Matthew Williams is a Consultant Oncologist at Imperial College Healthcare Trust. He aso leads the Computational Oncology group at Imperial College London. His academic work focuses on mathematical and computational approaches to clinical problems.He started the “Coding for medics” teaching course that taught undergraduate medical students the fundamentals of coding and was featured in the BBC documentary “Hospital” that narrates the journeys of patients suffering from medical conditions.We spoke about his work, how he utilises computational techniques for his research and we discussed advice for medical students looking to improve their computational skills.Academic website: https://www.imperial.ac.uk/people/matthew.williamsBlog: https://blogs.imperial.ac.uk/componc/Twitter: https://twitter.com/matthwilliams?lang=en

24mins

29 Jun 2022

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The Future Of Space Exploration | To Learn About The Future We Take A Look Way Back (And We Mean Way Back) In Time | An Audio Signals Conversation With Author And Space Journalist Matthew Williams

ITSPmagazine

Why is the sky blue? How come there are no more dinosaurs? Are we there yet? Why do we spend money on space exploration? On this podcast, we will not answer the first two questions, but we will discuss the fourth one extensively. As far as the third one goes, well, it depends where you want to go. Join our returning guest Matthew Williams and us as we talk about space, the James Webb Telescope and other kinds of telescopes, the cosmic dark ages, and why we must look and go into the stars to discover its past and our future. Stay tuned for an exoplanets conversation with Matthew in our next recording together. Enjoy, and look up!  _____________________________ GuestsMatthew WilliamsWriter and Curator for Universe Today [@universetoday]On LinkedIn | https://www.linkedin.com/in/matthew-s-williams-b1166b25/On Twitter | https://twitter.com/storybywillOn Facebook | https://www.facebook.com/houseofwilliams/On YouTube | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcu3JBI-f2WggOS-8UgQyZQ_____________________________ This Episode’s Sponsors Blue Lava: https://itspm.ag/blue-lava-w2qs Nintex: https://itspm.ag/itspntweb _____________________________ Resources https://jwst.nasa.gov/content/about/faqs/faq.html https://jwst.nasa.gov/index.html https://jwst.nasa.gov/content/webbLaunch/deploymentExplorer.html https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/webb/instruments/index.html https://www.universetoday.com/155062/wondering-about-the-6-rays-coming-out-of-jwsts-test-image-heres-why-they-happen/ https://www.universetoday.com/139461/what-comes-after-james-webb-and-wfirst-four-amazing-future-space-telescopes/ _____________________________ For more podcast stories from Audio Signals: https://www.itspmagazine.com/audio-signals Are you interested in sponsoring an ITSPmagazine Channel?👉 https://www.itspmagazine.com/podcast-series-sponsorships

48mins

29 Apr 2022

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What You Need to Know about Zoom Trials with Judge Matthew Williams

Elawvate

Perhaps no jurisdiction has conducted more Zoom jury trials since the start of the pandemic than King County (Seattle), Washington.  In this episode, Ben and Rahul speak with King County Superior Court Judge, Matthew Williams, about lessons he has learned managing Zoom trials, including his experience conducting jury selection. trial, witness examination, cross examination, use of exhibits, and his observations concerning the key differences between Zoom and in-person trials. About Judge WilliamsMatthew W. Williams is a Superior Court Judge for the State of Washington. Almost all of his time off the bench is devoted to Rule of Law and AntiCorruption Initiatives in pre/post conflict nations and emerging democracies around the world. He has such led initiatives in Central Asia, South America, Africa, the Middle East, and within the former Soviet Republics. He also has been invited to provide training and consultations for justice systems within those regions in culturally specific advocacy, case-management, transparency/ “open courts”, and judicial process and demeanor. Since 1985 he has served as an operational consultant and trainer in complex information gathering and analysis environments. Judge Williams teaches at the Washington State Judicial College and serves as member of Washington State Superior Court Judges Association (SCJA) Ethics and Education Committees. He serves as a trainer and presenter for the SCJA and the Washington State District and Municipal Judges Association (DMCJA) as well as the National Judicial College (NJC), and the National Center for State Courts (NCSC). Judge Williams serves on the Advisory Board of the Institute for the Global Understanding of the Rule of Law (IGUL), and as an Advisor to the Civil Jury Project at NYU School of Law. He is a member of the National Center for State Courts (NCSC) Post-Pandemic Planning Workgroup, and has provided consultation and training to judges throughout the United States on every aspect of remote/virtual operations. He was selected as 2021 Trial Judge of The Year by the Washington Chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). Judge Williams has taught Trial Advocacy at Seattle University School of Law (University of Puget Sound) since 1991. In 2020 he developed and conducted the first fully virtual Trial Advocacy program at Seattle University, which included both traditional in-person advocacy skills as well as the emerging skill sets associated with remote advocacy. Judge Williams has served many terms as faculty team leader for the renowned Kessler-Eidson Trial Techniques Program at Emory School of Law in Atlanta, Georgia. Additionally, from 2000-2016 he served as a Director of the National Institute of Trial Advocacy (NITA) Trial, Deposition, and Public Service Programs. In 2016 NITA awarded Judge Williams the Prentice Marshall Award for the Development of Innovative Teaching Methods. Judge Williams began his legal career(s) with the Attorneys General of Nebraska, Iowa, and Washington State. He handled death penalty and criminal appeals matters as well as complex commercial and tax litigation. He left State service and supervised Federal drug, weapons, and aviation enforcement. He then served as the Supervising Attorney for the City of Seattle’s Major Civil Litigation unit. He left public service in 1994 and became the Managing Attorney of a mid-sized law office until 2003. From 2003 to 2010, Judge Williams served as a general manager for a national insurance carrier where he managed multiple business units across the nation while implementing best practices and data driven decision making. Along the way, he served as a Special Disciplinary (Ethics) Counsel for the Washington State Bar Association, as a member of the Enforcement of Lawyer Conduct (ELT) Task Force, and as a Trustee of the Washington Defense Trial Lawyers (WDTL). In 2010 he was elected to the King County District Court. He was elected to the King County Superior Court in 2016. Judge Williams earned a Bachelor of Science in Economics from the University of Nebraska (1980), and a Juris Doctorate from the University of Nebraska School of Law (1983). He has logged thousands of hours as pilot-in-command. He holds the rank of Black Belt in Tae Kwon Do and has served as a martial arts and personal defense instructor. 

44mins

25 Apr 2022

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