OwlTail

Cover image of Willie Jackson

Willie Jackson

25 Podcast Episodes

Latest 18 Sep 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

Episode artwork

Willie Jackson: Te Reo prediction tool

The AM Show Catch Up Podcast

The AM Show | Listen on Magic Talk & watch on TV3 from 6am weekdays.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

9mins

15 Sep 2021

Episode artwork

Why Willie Jackson is not happy with Barry Soper

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Willie Jackson has taken a swipe at Pakeha media's handling of the issue of a koha to the Mongrel Mob.The Human Rights Commissioner caused a storm when he admitted to giving $200 at a Mob hui.The Maori Development Minister was asked whether he gave a koha when he visited.He says it's a stupid question."If you look at how Māori media and how Māori see this, 99 percent are in support of what we're saying."If you go to the other side, there's just no understanding. They talk about donations to the mob."In a social media post, Jackson also accused Newstalk ZB political editor Barry Soper of race baiting when the question was asked on his behalf. "No other media outlet thought I was aggressive. I thought it was a silly approach and a stupid question."Jackson says he's overseeing a review of Maori media and says there'll be more funding for it."I think they offer a perspective that a number of Pakeha journalists don't know." Listen above to Barry Soper's perspective on the Minister's comments

6mins

8 Jul 2021

Similar People

Episode artwork

Barry Soper: Willie Jackson on mongrel mob, emergency housing, and challenge for James Shaw

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Māori Development Minister Willie Jackson has defended the Human Rights Commission for giving koha to the Mongrel Mob stating one can "never walk away from tikanga".The Human Rights Commission has copped criticism from National and Act after Newstalk ZB revealed it gifted $200 as koha – a customary Māori gift or donation – to the Waikato chapter of the gang ahead of a hui in May.The parties said taxpayer money going to a gang was unacceptable, and called for chief human rights commissioner Paul Hunt to resign.Jackson was asked by media if he had ever given koha to the Mongrel Mob, having met with gang representatives on a few occasions.Jackson said he had not met with them on a marae and thus it was not relevant, but he defended the process as tikanga, custom."We are talking about carrying out tikanga. You get invited somewhere your obligation as Māori never leaves you, you give a koha."It is not about supporting them, we absolutely reject that gang life, you come to my marae you are not allowed patches."But it is not about supporting the Mob, this is nonsense from National and the Act Party."Minister for the Prevention of Family Violence and Sexual Violence Marama Davidson, who attended the same hui as Hunt, said she had not given koha."No, but all groups we visit around the country, when they are hosting and taking care of us it is up to us if we give koha, like we would for any group."Asked in the House today by National's police spokesman Simeon Brown if the Government supported the commission's actions, Minister of State Services Chris Hipkins, speaking on behalf of Justice Minister Kris Faafoi, said it was not appropriate to comment.The commission was legally established to be "independent and free from the direction of ministers or government policy", he said."The positions that they take will sometimes be positions that the Government of the day disagree with, and the members opposite should think carefully if they want to end up in a position where the chief human rights commissioner can only express views or take actions that the Government of the day sanctions."When asked if he thought Hunt should resign, Hipkins stated it required the Governor-General to be satisfied there was just cause."This Government follows the law," Hipkins said.Act Party leader David Seymour asked Hipkins if giving money to a criminal organisation met the threshold to remove the commissioner or if it was just "hakuna-matata", a Swahili phrase referenced in The Lion King loosely translated as "no worries".In response, Hipkins reiterated the commission's independence.Māori Party co-leader Rawiri Waititi asked a supplementary question about whether the minister thought the Opposition's interpretation of donation was "very different to the interpretation of koha"?He also asked of Act's former leader, "Don Brash sitting on an educational trust with the Mongrel Mob; does that sound like hakuna-matata?"Brown told media while independence of agencies like the commission should be respected, the Government should take responsibility for the inappropriate use of taxpayer funding."I refuse to think the minister thinks donating to organised crime is appropriate use of taxpayer funds."Hunt simply has to go and then the Government needs to take a long look at itself and how it is managing the rise of gangs in New Zealand."text by Michael Neilson, NZ Herald

6mins

6 Jul 2021

Episode artwork

Willie Jackson: Māori self-determination to 'bring us together'

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Māori self-determination will be "something that brings us together as a country", Māori Development Minister Willie Jackson says as he unveils the next steps for Aotearoa to realise its international obligations to indigenous peoples.Speaking at his marae in Tāmaki Makaurau, Ngā Whare Waatea, Jackson announced by the end of 2022 the Government would have signed off on a plan to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (Undrip) - the first in the world to have done so.It comes after a heated few months in Parliament after opposition parties leaked Government-commissioned document He Puapua, produced in 2019 to advise how New Zealand could realise its commitments under the Declaration.It included a roadmap to 2040 by which time it envisages various co-governance and Māori-run arrangements to address the huge inequities currently facing Māori.These include a separate Māori Parliament or upper house, health and justice systems, further return of Māori assets including foreshore and seabed, and recognition of cultural rights and equity.It was not Government policy, but National and Act labelled its Māori-focused initiatives as "separatist" and accused the Government of a hidden agenda.Jackson said this was not the case, rather the report was "a collection of ideas, suggestions aspirations and hopes for Maori – something to add to our discussions".New Zealand signed up to the Declaration in 2010 through then-Māori Affairs Minister and Māori Party co-leader Pita Sharples, under a National-led government.Jackson said today's announcement was continuing that cross-partisan work."It's appropriate we're at my marae, a cultural focal point for South Auckland Māori, to discuss a Declaration plan."For over 30 years Ngā Whare Waatea Marae has been a place for the local community to come together to plan for the future."He spoke of the kura, radio station, Whanau Ora, Youth programmes, domestic violence programmes, restorative justice, Marae justice, food bank - all on the marae grounds "where we exercise self-determination", Jackson said."However I know for many people who have never been to a marae like this, who may not be Māori – coming here can be scary."But I can assure you – once you walk through the gates you will be welcomed, you become part of what we have here and you will see, like many visitors before you, see that we have so much in common and share a belief in making Aotearoa the best country for all our children and our whanau to belong to."Like Ngā Whare Waatea, the Declaration can be a bit scary when you first look through its gates."But once we talk about it together, wananga, and even argue back and forth about it – it will become a place where talking about self-determination is welcomed, a place where we can share our aspirations and debate our future."It will be something that brings us together as a country."The Declaration was never meant to divide us. It is not a tool for separatism. It is not something to be afraid of. "Cabinet had signed off a two-step process, beginning with targeted engagement over the next few months with key iwi and significant Māori organisations on how they wish to be involved.This will be followed by wide public consultation with New Zealanders on a draft Declaration plan, with consultation next year with the aim to have it signed off at the end of 2022."The time is right to develop a plan that measures our progress in advocating for Māori in real and meaningful ways," Jackson said."This must reflect New Zealand and it's an important conversation for us to all have together as a nation.New Zealand is one of 148 countries that support the Declaration. Canada recently backed the Declaration with legislation and will have a plan in place within two years.Globally there is increased momentum to improve outcomes for indigenous peoples in areas such as health, education, and housing, Jackson said."This Government is focused on imp...

4mins

1 Jul 2021

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Willie Jackson: Māori Development Minister defends his meetings with gang members

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Māori Development Minister Willie Jackson has revealed he met with gang members four times since the election.ACT has spoken out against the move, saying the government should be standing up to the gangs not having cups of tea with them.And the Sensible Sentencing Trust says the government should work with victims instead.However, Jackson told Heather du Plessis-Allan that there is a long history of politicians meeting with gang leaders. He says he only met with Mongrel Mob once in December and Black Power representative Eugene Ryder - who Jackson says had dinner with former PM Sir John Key at Government House - three times. "I'll meet with them any time I like because we have to look after whanua, our communities, we have to run a twin strategy where we're tough on these gangs, but these women asked me to come out and meet with them and I did, because I'm worried about domestic violence."Jackson says that what he wants is a safer community, and Police Minister Poto Williams is running that strategy.He says he abhors gangs but there are wives and community members involved, and there needs to be a strategy to calming gangs and communities down. LISTEN ABOVE

4mins

1 Jun 2021

Episode artwork

How allyship can support healing the divide to create a more inclusive world with Willie Jackson

Shine

In this powerful interview, I speak to my friend and colleague Willie Jackson, a DEI Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Consultant & Head of Facilitation with ReadySet, a boutique consulting firm based in the San Francisco Bay Area. He is a frequent writer and speaker on the topics of workplace equity, global diversity, and inclusive leadership. Willie and I speak about what he learned in 2020 in the DEI space, what learning and development needs were being asked for most, and the importance of doing our inner work to be allies and create greater healing in the workplace and world. In this interview, you will learn what you can do to support the shift to a more inclusive workplace and world. When we commit to a conscious inner game, learn to sit with discomfort, and act courageously in the service of others, we can build a more unified and just world. Key Takeaways: [1:46] Carley defines allyship as the instrument that supports healing the divide to create a more inclusive world. [5:16] What does allyship in action look like? Carley shares several simple ideas and introduces her guest Willie Jackson. [7:19] Why does diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging matter to a black male in America? The story that wasn’t told inspired Willie to begin to both celebrate and heal. [11:50] How have Willie’s increased learnings, awareness, and failings influenced his work? [14:12] Willie shares his perspective on the awakening and increased awareness that have emerged as a result of the events of 2020. [19:25] Is it truly possible to affect long term change when facing the inconvenient reality that people are incredibly biased? [23:25] The goals and results of successful ally skills training, including defining values, recognizing identities, and increasing performative allyship. [27:54] Is it wrong to call yourself an ally? Willie explains the potentially harmful effects of making such a statement and what you can say instead. [32:10] The importance of creating brave spaces over creating safe spaces to effectively repair harm, even when it’s incredibly uncomfortable. [38:26] What can you do today to take the first step toward inclusion and greater diversity? [42:05] The most effective positive changes happen long after the one-day training is over. [46:30] What is the greatest obstacle to acting as an ally and how can you overcome it? [51:16] The value of taking time to truly learn and understand how our country got to the tragic point that it is at today. [52:25] Willie shares the number one quality that a person who is seeking to activate equality must possess. [56:11] Carley shares simple ways that you can take steps toward greater equality today. Resources: Leading from Wholeness Carley Hauck on Instagram Carley Hauck on LinkedIn Lead From Light Daily Rituals Four Sigmatic — use discount code SHINE for 15% off Shinebook Willie Jackson Seeing White Series from Duke Studies

59mins

19 Jan 2021

Episode artwork

Preserving Our Past to Better Our Future with Oregon Black Pioneers: Kim Moreland and Willie Jackson

Last Black Woman in Portland™️

In this episode, Amanda Jess calls Oregon Black Pioneers, Kim Moreland and Willie Jackson to discuss how to better our future while still researching the past.  Check them out! https://oregonblackpioneers.org/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lastblackwomanpdx/support

1hr 19mins

21 Oct 2020

Episode artwork

Willie Jackson and Heather du Plessis-Allan debate unemployment figures

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

The Employment Minister says figures showing unemployment at four percent don’t take into account everyone who’s out of work.Stats NZ figures show unemployment levels are four per cent for the June quarter.It fell from 4.2 percent in the March quarter.It's the first quarter to include the Covid-19 lockdown, with Treasury earlier forecasting it to be 8.3 per centWillie Jackson says to meet the definition, you have to not have a job, be available to start work - and actively seeking it.He told Heather Du Plessis-Allan over six weeks during lockdown, thousands weren’t able to seek work - and factoring them into unemployment rates would push it close to five percent. "Let's say it was 4,8 per cent, that's still not a bad result for a Government in a crisis situation when we had Treasury forecasting unemployment was going to hit 8.3 per cent in June." However, Jackson rejected claims by economists that these results are rogue. He says that this shows that what the Government has done is paying off. Finance Minister Grant Robertson says the full impact of Covid-19 will be seen next quarter. Jackson says a lot of interventions are underway to help the economy and everyday Kiwis."$380 million boost today in terms of apprenticeship. $1 billion investment in terms of creating green jobs. $2.6 billion in terms of infrastructure. There's so much there at the moment." LISTEN ABOVE

5mins

5 Aug 2020

Episode artwork

Business Leaders Having Uncomfortable Conversations About Race w/ Willie Jackson

Best-Self Management

Since late May 2020, there has been an accelerated evolution of the conversation around race and our roles as human beings, citizens, and business leaders. With this latest round of high-profile deadly police encounters with Black Americans and the massive response to it, many of us are at a loss about how to best respond. Business leaders especially may be avoiding the conversation because they are afraid to risk their futures because they said the wrong thing.  Today, we welcome Willie Jackson back to the podcast to continue the important conversation we began last time. More and more difficult conversations are happening across the country and around the world that require vulnerability and discomfort. Staying in the discomfort and being curious about it along with a willingness to be vulnerable and make mistakes, will lead to meaningful conversations that may in turn lead to long-lasting change in a country drenched in systemic racism.  We recognize that this is a time of opportunity, and these opportunities go far beyond simply issuing statements of support and solidarity. We can use the current situation to make sure that our organizations have an equity-informed view of how they operate that leads to sustainable shifts toward inclusion. Being an ally is not enough. It takes more than just doing something within your comfort zone to feel like you’re on the right side of history. Actual meaningful change takes moving from the noun of “ally” to the verb of “accomplice”—taking action to restore equity and justice to a system that is sorely lacking in those fundamentally important principles. This means examining power and privilege and being vocal, even if it comes at personal cost. How can you as a leader model become an accomplice in creating equity and inclusion in your organization? Let’s talk about it in the comments on the episode page! In this episode Why it may feel awkward to discuss race and how to address these feelings Embracing the discomfort of not knowing what to say or do, getting informed, and taking the risk to speak out from a place of vulnerability and knowledge Creating the conditions so that our organizations organically develop into equitable environments Acknowledging the social and historical context that affects everyone Being an accomplice rather than an ally Quotes “Many of us are ill-equipped to navigate the conversation at all. I think that it’s such an honest thing to say that it just feels awkward to name it. A lot of the conversation right now is about not burdening people of color in general, and black people specifically, about the dialogue.” [2:55] “Talking about race is awkward. It is challenging. Like anything - running a business, making money, playing the piano - it takes practice.” [3:51] “Acknowledging and repairing harm is a key part of how we can show up for each other.” [21:31] “In order to fully participate at a baseline level, we might need to radically reimagine how we’re thinking about performance reviews, the stereotypes that get perpetuated, the training that managers get, because people don’t leave companies. People leave managers.” [27:12] “It’s natural to want things to go back to normal. My fear is that we will forget that normal for a lot of people is suffering. It is fraught, and it brought about the conditions for the uprising that we’re seeing right now.” [31:16] Links Find Willie Jackson online ReadySet Upheaval by Jared Diamond Seeing White Slavery by Another Name by Douglas A. Blackmon Find 15Five online Follow 15Five on Facebook | Twitter | Linkedin Best-Self Review & Competency Assessment Remote Work Resources Join the Best-Self Academy for free 

45mins

30 Jun 2020

Episode artwork

Getting Serious About Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion w/ Willie Jackson

Best-Self Management

We stand at a pivotal moment in American history, one when there is an opportunity to correct massive injustice, dismantle the structures of systemic racism, and co-create a new future where all people can have true freedom, equal rights, and equal opportunities for a life of safety and prosperity.  Businesses are rightly being called to take meaningful action towards racism and that includes the policies they put in place to have more diverse and inclusive workplaces. We invited today’ guest on the show to share his wisdom about what we as business leaders can do to ensure diversity, equity, and inclusion in the workplace.  Willie Jackson is a keynote speaker, consultant, and facilitator at ReadySet who helps leaders and organizations advance vital conversations that unlock connections across differences. His belief in the transformative power of media to change narratives led him to found Abernathy, a magazine for black men backed by companies like Mailchimp, Atlassian, and WeWork. Willie served as Founding Technical Lead of Seth Godin’s altMBA program for high-performing individuals who want to level up and lead. Willie is an avid houseplant aficionado and loves to spread the gospel of self-watering planters whenever possible. COVID-19 has highlighted and put stress on numerous structural inequities, and it’s clear that some groups of people have been hit harder than others by the economic downturn. Willie explains why this is partly the result of a lack of workplace diversity. While lack of diversity is seldom intentional, it can be intentionally addressed. To that end, Willie shares his advice for engaging people in change-making conversations. Willie urges business leaders to embrace their sense of curiosity. Getting to know people with different experiences than you in an empathetic manner will lead to positive change. If there’s something that makes you uncomfortable, investigate that discomfort and see what it has to offer. It takes work to diversify your workforce, but it's important work. It will lead to having a variety of perspectives, increased market opportunities, and a workforce more representative of the world we want to create. How can you foster empathetic conversations in your workplace? Let us know in the comments on the episode page! In this episode The many societal disparities that the covid pandemic has exposed Why functional segregation exists and leads to a lack of workplace diversity Advice for engaging in difficult conversations How to help people lean into empathy Where to look for insight into unfamiliar life experiences The power of storytelling to foster empathy and increased trust Common implicit biases to be aware of Quotes “I think of COVID as an accelerant. It puts additional pressure on friction points that already exist in society.” [2:31] “There’s a different lens that has to be brought to bear when you think about how we’re representing the cities in which we live. How are we representing the societies we want to see? And how are we bringing into our teams and organizations a diversity of perspectives, bodies, and lived experiences?” [5:35] “When we make the time and space to genuinely ask somebody, and listen to what they have to say, I think it can add some powerful richness and dimensionality to all of our relationships. Simply the act of getting curious.” [22:40] “We all have blind-spots and we can make a mess of things even and especially when we’re trying.” [35:52] Links Find Willie Jackson online ReadySet altMBA Abernathy The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz “Coco” Find 15Five online Follow 15Five on Facebook | Twitter | Linkedin Best-Self Review & Competency Assessment Remote Work Resources Join the Best-Self Academy for free 

55mins

23 Jun 2020

Loading