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Jessica Hooten Wilson Podcasts

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12 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Jessica Hooten Wilson. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Jessica Hooten Wilson, often where they are interviewed.

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12 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Jessica Hooten Wilson. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Jessica Hooten Wilson, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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A Conversation With Jessica Hooten Wilson

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Jessica Hooten Wilson, Louise Cowan Scholar in Residence at the University of Dallas, joins Jeremy to discuss cancel culture's impact on the influential author Flannery O'Connor (as well as on literature in general) and elaborates on her work in preparing O’Connor’s unfinished novel Why Do the Heathen Rage? for publication. Additionally, Prof. Hooten Wilson discusses challenges faced in the classroom, to include confronting students' "idol of use." Make sure to catch her personal book recommendations too! Send comments or questions about this episode to anchored@cltexam.com.

Host Jeremy Tate @JeremyTate41
Guest Jessica Hooten Wilson @HootenWilson
How Flannery O'Connor Fought Racism in First Things—Hooten Wilson's response to The New Yorker article How Racist Was Flannery O'Connor?
Why Do the Heathen Rage?

Sep 16 2020 · 18mins
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A Catholic Approach To Literature With Dr. Jessica Hooten Wilson - Part 2

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In this part two of two, guest Dr. Jessica Hooten Wilson joins the show to discuss truth, goodness, and beauty in literature and examines Flannery O'Connor's approach as found in her "Mystery and Manners" collection of essays and talks.

Show Snippet: "This is a modern problem where I have students come in, and you look at a college student's calendar, and it's as though their identity is wrapped up in their to-do list. And so I always bring up the problem of the...baby who has this intrinsic beauty and value and worth without a to-do list, that person doesn't need a to-do list to be meaningful. And literature trains us to be that way towards people by training us to be that way towards literature itself. We let the literature be what it is."

Jul 28 2020 · 32mins

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A Catholic Approach to Literature with Dr. Jessica Hooten Wilson - Part 1

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This week we are pleased to have Dr. Jessica Hooten Wilson, Louise Cowan Scholar in Residence at the University of Dallas, share her insights on a Catholic approach to literature.

Show Snippet: "I can't quote C.S. Lewis enough, "In reading great literature I become a thousand people and yet remain myself..." when we delve into these perspectives in literature we actually take on other people's vision but you get to know your own better through that participation. You're not losing yourself in the book but gaining another way of seeing."

Jul 21 2020 · 30mins
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E138 Race and Grace in Flannery O'Connor's Work w/Jessica Hooten Wilson

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Race and Grace in Flannery O'Connor's Work w/Jessica Hooten Wilson

Today on the podcast we sit down with Dr. Jessica Hooten Wilson, Louise Cowan Scholar in Residence at the University of Dallas, to talk about charges of accusation levied against Flannery O'Connor, Flannery's cultural and literary milieu, costly grace, and more.

Resources:
Giving the Devil his Due by Jessica Hooten Wilson
Flannery O'Connor the and Christ-Haunted South by Ralph Wood
A Subversive Gospel by Michael Bruner
Passing by the Dragon by J. Ramsey Michaels

We'd love to hear what you think of this episode!

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Jul 20 2020 · 37mins

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Christian Humanist Profiles 191: Jessica Hooten Wilson

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Jessica Hooten Wilson joins Christina Bieber Lake to talk about her recent First Things article, "How Flannery O'Connor Fought Racism," a response to a recent Paul Elie New Yorker piece.
Jul 06 2020 · 1min
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Making Memoria #15: Jessica Hooten Wilson on Classical College Students

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Carrie Eben and Dr. Jessica Hooten Wilson discuss how classically educated and homeschooled students do in a college environment. 

Jun 11 2020 · 30mins
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Episode 14: Jessica Hooten Wilson

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Dr. Jessica Hooten Wilson, Associate Professor of English at John Brown University, is currently preparing the unfinished manuscript of Flannery O'Connor's last novel for publication. In this episode, Jonathan and Jessica geek out about Flannery O'Connor, exchange strategies for balancing academic writing and fiction, and discuss how reading poetry has made Jessica a better writer. 

Writers who make Jessica Hooten Wilson want to write:

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Aug 26 2019 · 36mins
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Libromania #13: Dostoevsky's Gambling Problem (featuring Dr. Jessica Hooten Wilson)

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Welcome to Libromania, a podcast for the book-obsessed from the Close Reads Podcast Network. Each week David Kern will be chatting with authors, biographers, designers, collectors, critics and other people who help make book's so worthy of our attention.

In this episode David chats with Dr. Jessica Hooten Wilson, author of Walker Percy, Fyodor Dostoesvsky, and the Search for Influence (among other books), about Dostoevsky's gambling problem and the impact that it had on his life and his work. They talk about the way he was an open book as a writer, the role of his second wife, Anna, and his seemingly autobiographical novel, The Gambler.

Remember: subscribe to Libromania wherever you get podcasts.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 24 2019 · 49mins
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Dostoevsky's Gambling Problem (featuring Dr. Jessica Hooten Wilson)

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Welcome to Libromania, a podcast for the book-obsessed from the Close Reads Podcast Network. Each week David Kern will be chatting with authors, biographers, designers, collectors, critics and other people who help make book's so worthy of our attention.

In this episode David chats with Dr. Jessica Hooten Wilson, author of Walker Percy, Fyodor Dostoesvsky, and the Search for Influence (among other books), about Dostoevsky's gambling problem and the impact that it had on his life and his work. They talk about the way he was an open book as a writer, the role of his second wife, Anna, and his seemingly autobiographical novel, The Gambler.

Remember: subscribe, rate, review!

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 22 2019 · 49mins
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Descent to Ascent: Jessica Hooten Wilson on Saints, Martyrs, Icons, and Heroes

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"I'm a Protestant who loves saints," says Jessica Hooten Wilson. Why do we read and write saints' lives? Hagiography is a long-practiced depiction of the holy and often wacky stories of saints and the wondrous elements of their lives as dedicated to God. Jessica Hooten Wilson identifies one of Flannery O'Connor's primary goals in her unfinished novel Why Do the Heathen Rage? as attempting to write a saint's life. And really, from one angle, a great deal of texts are trying to do this. In attempting to articulate the narrative of a saint's life, we are exercising a spiritual imagination for the sake of understanding the fullest expression of Christ in merely human life.

What follows the suggestion of the descent and ascent of saintly lives is a rich conversation about martyrdom, iconography, what it means to understand a great or holy text, as well as an appreciation for the aesthetic side of spirituality.

Click here for images referenced in the interview: Caravaggio's "Salome Holding the Head of John the Baptist"; Marco d’Agrate, Milan Duomo, "St. Bartholomew Flayed"; Nikola Sarić, "21 Libyan Martyrs Icon"

Show Notes

  • 1:15—"I'm a Protestant who loves saints." David Lyle Jeffrey's phrase "inextricably middled." How God can create a saint's life in your own life.
  • 2:49—Saint Theresa of the Little Way—"Our lives don't have to make headlines to be saints lives."
  • 3:50—What to do with the "white-washed" saints stories; "The reason you read the saint story is not because that person was holier than thou, but because God was holy in that person. That's where the beauty of the saint's life comes from."
  • 4:33—Augustine's Confessions, Lady Continence, St. Monica
  • 5:15—The three great works that everyone should read: Augustine's Confessions, Dante's Divine Comedy, and Dostoyevsky's The Brothers Karamazov
  • 6:25—O'Connor's use of the Descent-to-Ascent Model of saints lives
  • 7:13—Wilson defends O'Connor from the idea that O'Connor is too horrific. "Everyone has hold of the wrong horror." / Reference to "A Good Man is Hard to Find")
  • 8:53—Icons, Art, and Martyrdom; Caravaggio's "Salome Holding the Head of John the Baptist"; Marco d’Agrate, Milan Duomo, "St. Bartholomew Flayed"; Nikola Sarić, "21 Libyan Martyrs Icon"
  • 9:36—21 Lybian Martyrs (February 12, 2015); Matthew Ayariga: "My God is their God."
  • 12:30—The moral and religious uses of art, icons, stories, books, and sacred texts. 
  • 13:50—"It reads us rather than us consume it. ... It puts us in a different position in which we can be transformed. We can be read. We can be submissive. We can let go. We can be emptied of self before it, rather than trying to consume or get from it, something."
  • 14:55—Flannery: "We make the wrongful assumption that anyone who can read a telephone book can read a short story."
  • 15:15—How to read art, literature, and scripture: submissive, selfless, and no presuppositions. 
  • 16:30—Reference to A Wrinkle in Time: "You must attempt to understand in a flash."
  • 18:00—The humility required to stand under a text in order to understand it.
  • 18:27—Flannery O'Connor on self-knowledge: "...self‑knowledge, for O'Connor, is acknowledging what one lacks. It's measuring one's self against the truth, not measuring the truth against one's self."
  • 19:50—Self-knowledge: "Self‑knowledge cannot begin by a self-examination of self. It just sounds tautological, even when you try to explain it.
    Instead, you need the perspective of another. Preferably, a transcendent divine perspective to be an honest true perspective. Therefore, you'd be measuring yourself against the truth. You'd be seeing yourself truly as you are. I think there's a reason that Augustine cannot write an autobiography without having a conversion to Christianity."
  • 21:41—Really dumb dad-joke about mimes and St. Augustine's "take up and read" passage.
  • 22:20—End Interview, Credits

Credits

  • Hosted, Produced, and Edited by Evan Rosa
  • Sponsored by generous grants from the John Templeton Foundation, Templeton Religion Trust, and The Blankemeyer Foundation
  • Theme Music by The Brilliance
  • Twittering: @EvanSubRosa and @BiolaCCT
Jan 11 2019 · 23mins
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