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Lou Hernandez

9 Podcast Episodes

Latest 12 Jun 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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No One Has Ever Won an Argument with Someone with Alzheimer’s (with Mary Lou Hernandez)

Dementia Untangled

Our guest, Mary Lou Hernandez, a social worker for Banner Alzheimer’s institute, shares with us her practical strategies for helping care partners avoid arguments. She helps us untangle what instigates these interactions and how you can validate the emotions of your loved one with dementia in order to move forward. She reminds us of the obvious triggers that create uncomfortable situations and how to promote an environment that’s more conducive calm, instead of conflict. Understanding that caregiving is a learning process, she implores us to find the positivity in our efforts and be kind to ourselves as we navigate the dementia journey.

32mins

31 Mar 2021

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Lou Hernandez, "Bobby Maduro and the Cuban Sugar Kings" (McFarland, 2019)

New Books in American Studies

There are two key elements of today’s professional baseball that are informed by Lou Hernandez’s wonderful book Bobby Maduro and the Cuban Sugar Kings (McFarland, 2019): the increased presence of Latinos both on the field and off in MLB, and the interest of MLB to promote its game internationally, particularly in places such as Latin America. The life and career of Bobby Maduro sheds light on both of these topics.First, Maduro was greatly responsible for the Cuban League’s recognition by professional baseball (in the US). Within this framework, many Americanos played baseball in Cuba, and were exposed to the level of talent not only from that nation, but from elsewhere in the Spanish-speaking baseball world. This helped open the door to even more Latinos to make it into the higher levels of the minors, as well as eventually into the Majors. Second, Maduro was responsible for bringing AAA-level competition to Cuba. With the positive response of the fans (even in the midst of revolutionary turmoil), it did seem that, someday, the Sugar Kings’ slogan would come to fruition: “Un paso mas, y llegamos” (“One more step/level, and we’ll arrive”) meaning that Havana would have had its own MLB franchise before cities such as Montreal and Toronto. Unfortunately, as with so many other tragic results of the Castro dictatorship, that dream is now not only on hold, but it is surely dead for at least one or two more lifetimes.Bobby Maduro almost made that dream a reality. An examination of his career, and that of the Sugar Kings, provides great contextualization to the realities of MLB in the early 21st century. Hernandez’s book accomplishes this task very effectively.Jorge Iber is a professor of history at Texas Tech University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

52mins

26 Aug 2020

Similar People

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Lou Hernandez, "Bobby Maduro and the Cuban Sugar Kings" (McFarland, 2019)

New Books in History

There are two key elements of today’s professional baseball that are informed by Lou Hernandez’s wonderful book Bobby Maduro and the Cuban Sugar Kings (McFarland, 2019): the increased presence of Latinos both on the field and off in MLB, and the interest of MLB to promote its game internationally, particularly in places such as Latin America. The life and career of Bobby Maduro sheds light on both of these topics.First, Maduro was greatly responsible for the Cuban League’s recognition by professional baseball (in the US). Within this framework, many Americanos played baseball in Cuba, and were exposed to the level of talent not only from that nation, but from elsewhere in the Spanish-speaking baseball world. This helped open the door to even more Latinos to make it into the higher levels of the minors, as well as eventually into the Majors. Second, Maduro was responsible for bringing AAA-level competition to Cuba. With the positive response of the fans (even in the midst of revolutionary turmoil), it did seem that, someday, the Sugar Kings’ slogan would come to fruition: “Un paso mas, y llegamos” (“One more step/level, and we’ll arrive”) meaning that Havana would have had its own MLB franchise before cities such as Montreal and Toronto. Unfortunately, as with so many other tragic results of the Castro dictatorship, that dream is now not only on hold, but it is surely dead for at least one or two more lifetimes.Bobby Maduro almost made that dream a reality. An examination of his career, and that of the Sugar Kings, provides great contextualization to the realities of MLB in the early 21st century. Hernandez’s book accomplishes this task very effectively.Jorge Iber is a professor of history at Texas Tech University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

52mins

26 Aug 2020

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Lou Hernandez, "Bobby Maduro and the Cuban Sugar Kings" (McFarland, 2019)

New Books in Sports

There are two key elements of today’s professional baseball that are informed by Lou Hernandez’s wonderful book Bobby Maduro and the Cuban Sugar Kings (McFarland, 2019): the increased presence of Latinos both on the field and off in MLB, and the interest of MLB to promote its game internationally, particularly in places such as Latin America. The life and career of Bobby Maduro sheds light on both of these topics.First, Maduro was greatly responsible for the Cuban League’s recognition by professional baseball (in the US). Within this framework, many Americanos played baseball in Cuba, and were exposed to the level of talent not only from that nation, but from elsewhere in the Spanish-speaking baseball world. This helped open the door to even more Latinos to make it into the higher levels of the minors, as well as eventually into the Majors. Second, Maduro was responsible for bringing AAA-level competition to Cuba. With the positive response of the fans (even in the midst of revolutionary turmoil), it did seem that, someday, the Sugar Kings’ slogan would come to fruition: “Un paso mas, y llegamos” (“One more step/level, and we’ll arrive”) meaning that Havana would have had its own MLB franchise before cities such as Montreal and Toronto. Unfortunately, as with so many other tragic results of the Castro dictatorship, that dream is now not only on hold, but it is surely dead for at least one or two more lifetimes.Bobby Maduro almost made that dream a reality. An examination of his career, and that of the Sugar Kings, provides great contextualization to the realities of MLB in the early 21st century. Hernandez’s book accomplishes this task very effectively.Jorge Iber is a professor of history at Texas Tech University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sports

52mins

26 Aug 2020

Most Popular

Episode artwork

Lou Hernandez, "Bobby Maduro and the Cuban Sugar Kings" (McFarland, 2019)

New Books in Latino Studies

There are two key elements of today’s professional baseball that are informed by Lou Hernandez’s wonderful book Bobby Maduro and the Cuban Sugar Kings (McFarland, 2019): the increased presence of Latinos both on the field and off in MLB, and the interest of MLB to promote its game internationally, particularly in places such as Latin America. The life and career of Bobby Maduro sheds light on both of these topics.First, Maduro was greatly responsible for the Cuban League’s recognition by professional baseball (in the US). Within this framework, many Americanos played baseball in Cuba, and were exposed to the level of talent not only from that nation, but from elsewhere in the Spanish-speaking baseball world. This helped open the door to even more Latinos to make it into the higher levels of the minors, as well as eventually into the Majors. Second, Maduro was responsible for bringing AAA-level competition to Cuba. With the positive response of the fans (even in the midst of revolutionary turmoil), it did seem that, someday, the Sugar Kings’ slogan would come to fruition: “Un paso mas, y llegamos” (“One more step/level, and we’ll arrive”) meaning that Havana would have had its own MLB franchise before cities such as Montreal and Toronto. Unfortunately, as with so many other tragic results of the Castro dictatorship, that dream is now not only on hold, but it is surely dead for at least one or two more lifetimes.Bobby Maduro almost made that dream a reality. An examination of his career, and that of the Sugar Kings, provides great contextualization to the realities of MLB in the early 21st century. Hernandez’s book accomplishes this task very effectively.Jorge Iber is a professor of history at Texas Tech University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latino-studies

52mins

26 Aug 2020

Episode artwork

Lou Hernandez, "Bobby Maduro and the Cuban Sugar Kings" (McFarland, 2019)

New Books in Caribbean Studies

There are two key elements of today’s professional baseball that are informed by Lou Hernandez’s wonderful book Bobby Maduro and the Cuban Sugar Kings (McFarland, 2019): the increased presence of Latinos both on the field and off in MLB, and the interest of MLB to promote its game internationally, particularly in places such as Latin America. The life and career of Bobby Maduro sheds light on both of these topics.First, Maduro was greatly responsible for the Cuban League’s recognition by professional baseball (in the US). Within this framework, many Americanos played baseball in Cuba, and were exposed to the level of talent not only from that nation, but from elsewhere in the Spanish-speaking baseball world. This helped open the door to even more Latinos to make it into the higher levels of the minors, as well as eventually into the Majors. Second, Maduro was responsible for bringing AAA-level competition to Cuba. With the positive response of the fans (even in the midst of revolutionary turmoil), it did seem that, someday, the Sugar Kings’ slogan would come to fruition: “Un paso mas, y llegamos” (“One more step/level, and we’ll arrive”) meaning that Havana would have had its own MLB franchise before cities such as Montreal and Toronto. Unfortunately, as with so many other tragic results of the Castro dictatorship, that dream is now not only on hold, but it is surely dead for at least one or two more lifetimes.Bobby Maduro almost made that dream a reality. An examination of his career, and that of the Sugar Kings, provides great contextualization to the realities of MLB in the early 21st century. Hernandez’s book accomplishes this task very effectively.Jorge Iber is a professor of history at Texas Tech University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/caribbean-studies

52mins

26 Aug 2020

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Ep. 60 - Lou Hernandez

Illini Inquirer Podcast: An Illinois Fighting Illini athletics podcast

Illini Inquirer's Jeremy Werner catches up with Illinois football strength and conditioning coach Lou Hernandez to discuss the 2020 offseason, why the mental part of his job is as important as the physical, what he learned about Lovie Smith, why he grew out his hair and the 2007 Illini team that went to the Rose Bowl. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

32mins

13 Feb 2020

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Ep. 47 - Instagram Live Chat w/ Lou Hernandez & Alberto Lafarga (Batman, Teen Titans, Avengers, AMC A*List, and more)

Rock & Comics

On this special two year anniversary episode of the Rock & Comics podcast, host Anthony Esparza sits down for a special LIVE Instagram chat...but he's not alone. Featured on this episode is Slugger bassist/Defy The Tyrants manager Lou Hernandez (www.instagram.com/mrtwodogshumping) and Defy The Tyrants bassist Alberto Lafarga (www.instagram.com/theiraqster). They answer viewers questions regarding Batman, Teen Titans, Young Justice, Marvel vs DC, Avengers, Superman, and more while also discussing their recent experiences with AMC A*List, and compare HULU LIVE TV/Playstation Vue. This is a can't miss episode!Follow Anthony on Instagram (www.instagram.com/anthony_defy)Follow Rock & Comics on Instagram (www.instagram.com/rock_and_comics)Follow Defy The Tyrants on Instagram (www.instagram.com/defy_the_tyrants)Follow Rock & Comics on Spotify (https://open.spotify.com/show/4D0cNKSGXUb3tCbmovDvA7?si=yGprU5NYTgO-hw3IFyOnKQ)Subscribe to Rock & Comics on Apple Podcasts/iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/rock-comics/id1141600775?mt=2)

1hr 14mins

14 Aug 2018

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Ep. 43 - Avengers: Infinity War with Lou Hernandez (*SPOILER REVIEW*)

Rock & Comics

IT’S HERE! The mad Titan, Thanos, has arrived and we are ready to finally review one of the most anticipated films of all time, Avengers: Infinity War! Host Anthony Esparza sits down with 1988 productions & Defy The Tyrants manager, Lou Hernandez, as they talk non stop spoilers. Nothing is left on the table as they discuss the deaths of several characters, Josh Brolin’s performance as Thanos, the most emotional beats of the film, and much more.www.instagram.com/anthony_defywww.twitter.com/rockandcomicspcwww.instagram.com/defythetyrants

1hr 4mins

30 Apr 2018