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Sarah Ramey

9 Podcast Episodes

Latest 4 Apr 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Ep 8: Believe Her with Author and Musician Sarah Ramey

The Canary Collective Podcast

Explicit Language warning! We get feisty with a few f-words, but who can blame us after what we've been through thanks to gaslighting doctors?! In this special extended episode of The Canary Collective Podcast, I, Kaeley Pruitt-Hamm, interview author and musician Sarah Ramey. Sarah and I share many similarities, the most important being that our devastating illnesses that hit us in our twenties launched us into a "medical labyrinth" that connected us with all kinds of other sick womxn. We were told our debilitating chronic illness and chronic pelvic pain symptoms were rare, and then proceeded to meet thousands of others like us - "WOMIs," as Sarah likes to call us, or "Women with Mysterious Illness," - or "canaries," as I like to say. Sarah wrote an absolutely riveting, "oh-snap!"-moment-filled, deliciously humorous book called "The Lady's Handbook for Her Mysterious Illness: A Memoir," which was reviewed by the likes of Chelsea Clinton and published by Penguin Random House. I interviewed her before I had read her book, just to capture the conversation of "you too? me too!" I thought we might have. Follow Sarah Ramey's work, order the book, plus listen to her excellent music she releases as "Wolf Larsen": https://www.sarahmarieramey.com/ Watch the Sarah Ramey interview on youtube: https://youtu.be/17K0nHG0QYg

1hr 49mins

4 Mar 2021

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The Power of Negative Thinking w/Sarah Ramey

You're Going to Die: The Podcast

GET more of Sarah Ramey HERE.BUY Sarah’s book HERE or at your local bookstore.DONATE to www.meaction.net - an advocacy & research organization that focusses on ME/CFS.The track “If I Be Wrong” written & performed by Wolf Larsen [aka Sarah Ramey] - GET at her album HERE.Special thanks to Asher Buskirk for her creative being in the world.Produced by Nick JainaSound Engineering by Nick Jaina”YG2D Podcast Theme Song” Produced by Scott Ferreter & eO w/vocals by Jordan Edelheit, Morgan Bolender, Chelsea Coleman & Ned BuskirkTHIS PODCAST IS MADE POSSIBLE WITH A GRANT FROM THE PECK FOUNDATION & SUPPORT FROM LISTENERS LIKE YOUBecome a podcast patron now at https://www.patreon.com/YG2DFind out more at www.yg2d.com

7 Jan 2021

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The Lady's Handbook for Her Mysterious Illness- Interview with Sarah Ramey

The Real Life Show: Living with a Chronic Illness

"The Lady’s Handbook for Her Mysterious Illness is a memoir with a mission: to help the millions of (mostly) women who suffer from unnamed or misunderstood conditions–autoimmune illnesses, fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome, chronic Lyme disease, chronic pain, and many more. Ramey’s pursuit of a diagnosis and cure for her own mysterious illness becomes a page-turning medical mystery that reveals a new understanding of today’s chronic illnesses as ecological in nature, driven by modern changes to the basic foundations of health, from the quality of our sleep, diet, and social connections to the state of our microbiomes. Her book will open eyes, change lives, and, ultimately, change medicine."- Penguin Random HouseThis book is absolutely incredible and we recommend it to everyone and anyone! Go to our Instagram to enter our book giveaway!Connect with Sarah & buy her book here: https://amzn.to/2S2bzs8https://www.instagram.com/sarahmarieramey/https://www.instagram.com/therealspooniesunite/https://www.therealspooniesunite.com/hello@TheRealSpooniesUnite.comhttps://www.facebook.com/groups/2443751542368935Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/therealspooniesunite)

1hr 7mins

15 Jul 2020

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(Explicitly Sick) ME, POTS, Mayo Clinic, and What Persephone Has To Do With It: Sarah Ramey - Part 2

Invisible Not Broken - Chronic Illness Podcast Network

SARAH MARIE RAMEYEmail address *sarahmarieramey@gmail.comWebsite/Blog, Twitter, & Instagram Handlewww.sarahmarieramey.com @sarahmarieramey and @wolflarsenmusic for bothName *Sarah RameyWhat is your disorder? *Hoo boy. What isn't my disorder? We can limit it to ME/CFS, complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Vulvodynia, a neurogenic bowel, mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) too. You can just say the first three if you prefer - it starts to sound like reading the alphabet.At what age did your disorder become a daily issue? *22Who were you before your illness became debilitating? *I was incredibly active. At the time I got sick I was directing the college musical, the head of the women's a cappella group, the singer in a loud rock band, and a senior in college.What would you do if you were not dealing with your disorder and/or disability? *You know, I recently read through a journal from my senior year of college - and all I wanted to become was a musician and a writer. So despite it all, I somehow managed to stay on track there. I actually think it's quite likely I would have been pulled *off* track if I had not become sick, just because making money as an artist is such a challenge - and in my case, since I was stuck at home all the time, writing and music were some of the only options. However, as so many have suggested, this is not some sort of cosmic gift or rebalancing. I would give up being a writer and a musician in the blink of an eye if I could just have my health back. And indeed, sick people shouldn't have to choose. Being sick is not like wishing on a monkey's paw and getting what you always wanted, but at terrible a cost. I reject this, and think we should be working to understand these disease so that we can return health to the these patients, *so that* they can pursue their dreams fully. That's a long-winded way of saying: I would be doing music and writing, but in a much more active, and outward way. I would tour, I would play live, I would do book fairs and publicity events, and teach, and lecture - all things that are 90% not available to me in my current state (though I can do a little, and a little is much more than nothing).What would you like people to know about your daily life? *My daily life is what a normal person would consider a hellscape - filled with extreme pain, both abdominal, spinal, and vagina, and long periods of extreme exhaustion, heart problems, and brain fog. I have an ileostomy, which means I have an external bag for my own poop, and have to empty that 6-10 times a day. The pelvic pain is constant and excruciating. But, and this is the point, this is a *major improvement*. I used to be nearly comatose all day long with severe ME/CFS, with my mother propping me up to feed me soup. The pain used to be even worse than it is now. And before we diverted my colon, I was spending about 8 hours stuck in the bathroom every single morning and early afternoon, and couldn't leave the house - ever - until about 2 or 3 pm, like a vampire. So compared to that, I feel like I am actually doing quite well! I can leave the house in the mornings, I'm not stuck on a toilet all day, and the fatigue - while very bad for a normal person - is nowhere near as bad as it gets that the severe end of the spectrum. Hellish for a Normal, Not Half Bad for me.What would make living and moving in the world easier for you? *Never having to explain that I am actually sick just because I look fine. All kinds of people with very serious illnesses look fine, and they have but to say, "I have stage 4 cancer," and the entire world knows to respond seriously. I have never, not once in my life, told anyone I have ME/CFS and had the response be "Oh no, I am so sorry to hear that." Never! That is extraordinary and devastating.Do you have any life hacks? *I batch everything - I batch meals and make 4x as much as I need so that I have food for a while. I batch work, and have chunks of time set aside for email, for most important task of the day, for social media, and for reaching out to my friends and family. When I get away from batching, especially with work, I just feel constantly overwhelmed.What kind of support do you get from family or friends? *At this point, I have a lot of friends who check in on me, and my parents are extremely supportive. It's important to note: this was not always the case. This took a lot of asking for support, explaining my condition, explaining how isolated I was, explaining how painful it was to be the one always reaching out for help. But all those painful conversations paid off, and I feel pretty well supported these days. Indeed, especially since COVID19 - I've heard from every person I've ever met in my life.Have you ever had someone, or a medical professional, not believe you have an invisible illness because of your appearance and if so are there any examples that stand out? *Lol. Yes. As you know, the whole book is about this. There are many examples - from the innocuous but still amazing (Sarah, diet has nothing to do with irritable bowel syndrome), to the catastrophic (the surgeon who cut out a piece of my labia and then accused me of orchestrating the whole thing so I could get him to give me one Percocet).How has your chronic illness affected your relationships? *I have a few friends who are and have been extraordinary throughout all of this, but for most of my relationships the illness put an enormous strain on. Because there is no infrastructure around these illnesses, no one knows how to help, how to respond, if it's really happening at all - and so you just end up incredibly alienated from the very people you need the most, your close friends and family. It's quite different from having a problem where there are haters Out There, on the internet, or in society - but you and your family and your tribe are in solidarity. There is often no support for these illnesses, even from close friends and family - which is heartbreaking.Is there anything you are afraid to tell people in your life? *Haha - not anymore! This book is pretty...comprehensive.What is your best coping mechanism? *Gardening. This is new to me, and one of the most effective things I have found that genuinely resets the stress and/or sadness cascade. I have a container garden on our roof here, and I tend to it every day, and it is quite literally the best part of every day.What are you the most concerned about and the most hopeful for in the future? *Most concerned: that there will be a wave of ME/CFS post-COVID19, since all viruses have been linked to triggering this disease, it would be surprising if COVID19 is exempt. I am very worried that these people will be treated just as atrociously as the rest of us. On the flip side, this is actually where I feel some real hope. I think that because the cases will be highly visible, and because I think the ME/CFS community will be vocal about speaking up for this patient population, we may actually see at change at the CDC and the NIH where they change their mind about the nature of ME/CFS (which they still believe is essentially psychological). Unless they are prepared to make the case that these tens of thousands of patients - who were completely healthy and normal beforehand and are now glued permanently to their beds - are simply malingerers and hypochondriacs, a very bad look for the NIH and CDC with the world watching, I think this may finally open the door for taking this phenomenon seriously, with real funding and real research. This doesn't help the larger WOMI population, which is not just limited to ME/CFS, but I think if just one major group is taken seriously, then all the related problems will necessarily have to be taken more seriously as well. Or, should be.What makes you energized or enthusiastic? What drains you?The answer to both questions is: conversation! I am pretty isolated, and so conversation is hugely important to me - but it's also very draining. This is one thing that I just accept, and the pros outweigh the cons.Any favorite books or shows?Outlander! :)What is the hardest and/or best lesson your condition has taught you?I can survive anything.What is the best purchase under $100 that helped your lifeMy Slate Plus membership - I am an avid podcast listener, and Slate Plus is a yearly membership of $50 that gives you access to more of their podcasts, bonus sections of each podcast, etc. I genuinely feel that this family of podcasts has improved my quality of life. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

51mins

27 May 2020

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(Explicitly Sick) ME, POTS, Mayo Clinic, and What Persephone Has To Do With It: Sarah Ramey - Part 1

Invisible Not Broken - Chronic Illness Podcast Network

SARAH MARIE RAMEYEmail address *sarahmarieramey@gmail.comWebsite/Blog, Twitter, & Instagram Handlewww.sarahmarieramey.com @sarahmarieramey and @wolflarsenmusic for bothName *Sarah RameyWhat is your disorder? *Hoo boy. What isn't my disorder? We can limit it to ME/CFS, complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Vulvodynia, a neurogenic bowel, mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) too. You can just say the first three if you prefer - it starts to sound like reading the alphabet.At what age did your disorder become a daily issue? *22Who were you before your illness became debilitating? *I was incredibly active. At the time I got sick I was directing the college musical, the head of the women's a cappella group, the singer in a loud rock band, and a senior in college.What would you do if you were not dealing with your disorder and/or disability? *You know, I recently read through a journal from my senior year of college - and all I wanted to become was a musician and a writer. So despite it all, I somehow managed to stay on track there. I actually think it's quite likely I would have been pulled *off* track if I had not become sick, just because making money as an artist is such a challenge - and in my case, since I was stuck at home all the time, writing and music were some of the only options. However, as so many have suggested, this is not some sort of cosmic gift or rebalancing. I would give up being a writer and a musician in the blink of an eye if I could just have my health back. And indeed, sick people shouldn't have to choose. Being sick is not like wishing on a monkey's paw and getting what you always wanted, but at terrible a cost. I reject this, and think we should be working to understand these disease so that we can return health to the these patients, *so that* they can pursue their dreams fully. That's a long-winded way of saying: I would be doing music and writing, but in a much more active, and outward way. I would tour, I would play live, I would do book fairs and publicity events, and teach, and lecture - all things that are 90% not available to me in my current state (though I can do a little, and a little is much more than nothing).What would you like people to know about your daily life? *My daily life is what a normal person would consider a hellscape - filled with extreme pain, both abdominal, spinal, and vagina, and long periods of extreme exhaustion, heart problems, and brain fog. I have an ileostomy, which means I have an external bag for my own poop, and have to empty that 6-10 times a day. The pelvic pain is constant and excruciating. But, and this is the point, this is a *major improvement*. I used to be nearly comatose all day long with severe ME/CFS, with my mother propping me up to feed me soup. The pain used to be even worse than it is now. And before we diverted my colon, I was spending about 8 hours stuck in the bathroom every single morning and early afternoon, and couldn't leave the house - ever - until about 2 or 3 pm, like a vampire. So compared to that, I feel like I am actually doing quite well! I can leave the house in the mornings, I'm not stuck on a toilet all day, and the fatigue - while very bad for a normal person - is nowhere near as bad as it gets that the severe end of the spectrum. Hellish for a Normal, Not Half Bad for me.What would make living and moving in the world easier for you? *Never having to explain that I am actually sick just because I look fine. All kinds of people with very serious illnesses look fine, and they have but to say, "I have stage 4 cancer," and the entire world knows to respond seriously. I have never, not once in my life, told anyone I have ME/CFS and had the response be "Oh no, I am so sorry to hear that." Never! That is extraordinary and devastating.Do you have any life hacks? *I batch everything - I batch meals and make 4x as much as I need so that I have food for a while. I batch work, and have chunks of time set aside for email, for most important task of the day, for social media, and for reaching out to my friends and family. When I get away from batching, especially with work, I just feel constantly overwhelmed.What kind of support do you get from family or friends? *At this point, I have a lot of friends who check in on me, and my parents are extremely supportive. It's important to note: this was not always the case. This took a lot of asking for support, explaining my condition, explaining how isolated I was, explaining how painful it was to be the one always reaching out for help. But all those painful conversations paid off, and I feel pretty well supported these days. Indeed, especially since COVID19 - I've heard from every person I've ever met in my life.Have you ever had someone, or a medical professional, not believe you have an invisible illness because of your appearance and if so are there any examples that stand out? *Lol. Yes. As you know, the whole book is about this. There are many examples - from the innocuous but still amazing (Sarah, diet has nothing to do with irritable bowel syndrome), to the catastrophic (the surgeon who cut out a piece of my labia and then accused me of orchestrating the whole thing so I could get him to give me one Percocet).How has your chronic illness affected your relationships? *I have a few friends who are and have been extraordinary throughout all of this, but for most of my relationships the illness put an enormous strain on. Because there is no infrastructure around these illnesses, no one knows how to help, how to respond, if it's really happening at all - and so you just end up incredibly alienated from the very people you need the most, your close friends and family. It's quite different from having a problem where there are haters Out There, on the internet, or in society - but you and your family and your tribe are in solidarity. There is often no support for these illnesses, even from close friends and family - which is heartbreaking.Is there anything you are afraid to tell people in your life? *Haha - not anymore! This book is pretty...comprehensive.What is your best coping mechanism? *Gardening. This is new to me, and one of the most effective things I have found that genuinely resets the stress and/or sadness cascade. I have a container garden on our roof here, and I tend to it every day, and it is quite literally the best part of every day.What are you the most concerned about and the most hopeful for in the future? *Most concerned: that there will be a wave of ME/CFS post-COVID19, since all viruses have been linked to triggering this disease, it would be surprising if COVID19 is exempt. I am very worried that these people will be treated just as atrociously as the rest of us. On the flip side, this is actually where I feel some real hope. I think that because the cases will be highly visible, and because I think the ME/CFS community will be vocal about speaking up for this patient population, we may actually see at change at the CDC and the NIH where they change their mind about the nature of ME/CFS (which they still believe is essentially psychological). Unless they are prepared to make the case that these tens of thousands of patients - who were completely healthy and normal beforehand and are now glued permanently to their beds - are simply malingerers and hypochondriacs, a very bad look for the NIH and CDC with the world watching, I think this may finally open the door for taking this phenomenon seriously, with real funding and real research. This doesn't help the larger WOMI population, which is not just limited to ME/CFS, but I think if just one major group is taken seriously, then all the related problems will necessarily have to be taken more seriously as well. Or, should be.What makes you energized or enthusiastic? What drains you?The answer to both questions is: conversation! I am pretty isolated, and so conversation is hugely important to me - but it's also very draining. This is one thing that I just accept, and the pros outweigh the cons.Any favorite books or shows?Outlander! :)What is the hardest and/or best lesson your condition has taught you?I can survive anything.What is the best purchase under $100 that helped your lifeMy Slate Plus membership - I am an avid podcast listener, and Slate Plus is a yearly membership of $50 that gives you access to more of their podcasts, bonus sections of each podcast, etc. I genuinely feel that this family of podcasts has improved my quality of life. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1hr 19mins

14 May 2020

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Sarah Ramey, Writing Her Story as a Woman with Mysterious Illnesses

Made Visible

Sarah Ramey has a term for people like her. She calls herself a WOMI, or a “woman with a mysterious illness.” On today’s episode, Sarah tells me about the events that set her life as a WOMI in motion, and what it was like to be told over and over that her problems were psychosomatic. We also discuss her recently published book, The Lady’s Handbook for Her Mysterious Illness, and how she hopes it will change the experience for other patients with mysterious illnesses as they seek answers. Learn more about Sarah and check out the show notes here. Follow Made Visible on Instagram. We want to learn more about you! Tell us about you and what got you listening to Made Visible here. 

40mins

7 May 2020

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Master Mind Strength & Conditioning-Work Life Balance- Sarah Ramey

Master Mind Strength & Conditioning Podcast

On Master Mind Strength & Conditioning Podcast this week, is the second episode in the series that will be diving into work life balance. Understanding that strength coaches work long days and burn out is real. On this episode Coach Sarah Ramey of West Texas A&M joins us. Coach Ramey is the Head Strength and Conditioning Coach who built the Sports Performance program from nothing. It’s a great episode of how she has developed her idea of work life balance over her career. How she helps her young staff find their work life balance to avoid possible burn out in their career. Hope everyone enjoys this episode. Coaches who are looking for an all in one place for continuing education, you can check out the link below for StrengthCoachNetwork.com where there are hundreds of webinars and discussions available. I have been a member for the last two years and it is a great resource for any coach at any level. Music: I dunno by grapes (c) copyright 2008 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/grapes/16626 Ft: J Lang, MorusqueContact: Mastermindstrengthconditioning@gmail.com Strength Coach Network.comhttp://strength-coach-network.ontraport.com/t?orid=14069&opid=4

30mins

21 Apr 2020

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3.05: Learning to Trust Yourself with Sarah Ramey

The Point of Pain

Sarah Ramey is the incredible author of The Lady's Handbook for Her Mysterious Illness. Her book opened up a part of the world of health and chronic illness for me that I haven’t had a lot of exposure to and her story is so impactful and eye-opening. Sarah is also a writer and musician living in Washington, DC. She graduated from Bowdoin College in 2003, received an MFA in creative nonfiction writing from Columbia in 2007, and worked on President Obama’s 2008 campaign. She is also the recipient of a 2018 Whiting grant. In this episode, Sarah shares her experience with having her life turned upside down because of her mysterious illness, why it’s so important to have a community that understands you, how she’s been able to turn difficult family relationships into positive sources of support, and so much more! To learn more, visit the show notes. Want to continue the love-fest? Follow me on Instagram!

48mins

29 Mar 2020

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Ep. 56 – Living with Mysterious Illness & Learning to Advocate for Yourself with Sarah Ramey

Chronically Healing Podcast

Author Sarah Ramey joined me on the Chronically Healing Podcast to tell her chronic illness and advocacy story. Sarah just came out with her memoir, "The Lady's Handbook to her Mysterious Illness" which I haven't been able to put down since I got my hands on it. Sarah's podcast is all about remembering that you're not crazy and you are NOT alone. Living with multiple chronic and mysterious illnesses herself, Sarah takes us through her story, why she wrote her memoir and the importance of asking for help and advocating for yourself. Tune in to today's podcast and don't forget to grab her book - it's truly a new favorite of mine! In today's episode we chat about ...  Sarah's story with mysterious illness and the years of being dismissed for her pain and mysterious illnesses When and why she decided to write her memoir The importance of connection and friendship, even during your most difficult times with illness Taking care of yourself and advocating for your health Links and things ... Buy Sarah's book! Sarah's Twitter Sarah's Instagram Chronically Healing Instagram FREE Chronically Healing Facebook Community Email the podcast: jessiefritzcoaching@gmail.com

57mins

25 Mar 2020