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CONOR WALSH

6 Podcast Episodes

Latest 3 Dec 2022 | Updated Daily

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Conor Walsh on Harvard: Linguistics, Homeless Shelter, and Buddhist History Trek in the Himalayas.

College Matters. Alma Matters.

Episode summary introduction: Conor studied French and Chinese in High School. He loved languages. Grammar, the sounds. Literature and the culture. In College, he wanted more. Conor Walsh is a graduate of Harvard University with a Bachelor’s degree in Linguistics. In particular, we discuss the following with him: Why Harvard? Love for Languages Homeless Shelter & Summer Academy The Himalayan Trek Advice to Applicants Topics discussed in this episode: Introduction to Conor Walsh, Harvard [0:53] Hi Fives - Podcast Highlights [1:38] Harvard - “Ginormous Waterfall” [5:12] Why Harvard? [6:32] High School Interests - Languages [8:35] Transition to Harvard - Managing Choices [11:04] Peers - “Prodigiously Intelligent” [15:07] High Quality Profs [20:16] Dorms - Powerful Social Experience [22:45] Campus Life - Something for Everyone [27:12] Homeless Shelter, Summer Academy, Freshman Pre-Orientation [30:52] Summers - To the Himalayas and Chennai [36:55] Passion for Linguistics [40:56] Senior Thesis on Irish Language Policy [45:14] Harvard’s Impact on Career [52:03] Why MBA? [56:40] Harvard Redo? [59:57] Advice to Aspirants [1:01:42] “Loud, Fun and Messy!” [1:06:20] Our Guest: Conor Walsh is a graduate of Harvard University with a Bachelor’s degree in Linguistics. Conor went on to get his Master of Arts in Language Studies from the National University of Ireland, Galway. Conor subsequently got his MBA from Harvard Business School. Memorable Quote: “And it's an absolute cacophony, which is just how I like my experience - loud, fun and messy.” Conor Walsh about the day Freshmen are told which Residential House they are placed into. Episode Transcript: Please visit Episode’s Transcript. Calls-to-action: Subscribe to our Weekly Podcast Digest. To Ask the Guest a question, or to comment on this episode, email podcast@almamatters.io. Subscribe or Follow our podcasts at any of these locations:, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, RadioPublic, Breaker, Anchor. For Transcripts of all our podcasts, visit almamatters.io/podcasts.

1hr 10mins

11 Apr 2021

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Conor Walsh - Passing Through

Documentary on One Podcast

Conor Walsh was a minimalist piano composer from Co. Mayo, whose musical career was just beginning when he died suddenly of a heart attack in 2016 aged 36. Within days of his burial, Conor's sister found 37 unpublished tracks on his laptop, and so began his family’s journey to release his posthumous debut album, The Lucid. (2020) Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

45mins

19 Jun 2020

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EP32 - Digital Nomad Travels in Africa with Freelance Writer Conor Walsh

Digital Nomad Cafe Podcast | Online Business, Freelancing & Remote Work

Today we have another Irish Digital Nomad out in the world! I met Conor Walsh many years ago on an island in Thailand called Koh Tao when he was working in a hostel I was staying at. He saw me swinging in a hammock while working on my laptop and was interested in learning more! Following a crash course in Wordpress over a few beers, he now works 100% online while traveling the world.As a Ghostwriter his content has been published in The Guardian, BBC, Forbes and Bloomberg.Conor runs https://nomadafrica.co/ and a the Nomad Africa Community on Facebook You can follow his personal blog here! https://ctwalsh.com/Podcast Topics:Being a Digital Nomad in East Africa!How a chance meeting one day on an island in Thailand sparked the online entrepreneur flame in Conors life.Getting started as a freelance writerFinding clients as a ghostwriterMoving to Bansko & Africa as a Digital NomadThere are 30 coworking spaces in Nairobi, Kenya with many multinational digital companies there including Facebook, Google, Oracle and many moreThe vibrant fun and entrepreneurship is abundant in Kenya!Conor left Ireland 8 years ago to travel and is still going with his adventures!He works as a Ghostwriter for data privacy and data protection See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

35mins

11 Feb 2020

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DISRUPTIVE: BIO-INSPIRED ROBOTICS (1) RADHIKA NAGPAL, (2) ROBERT WOOD, AND (3) CONOR WALSH

Free Forum with Terrence McNally

Welcome to the second episode of my new monthly podcast series produced with Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering.DISRUPTIVE: BIO-INSPIRED ROBOTICS features three separate interviews with (1) RADHIKA NAGPAL, (2) ROBERT WOOD, and (3) CONOR WALSH. From insects in your backyard, to creatures in the sea, to what you see in the mirror, engineers and scientists at Wyss are drawing inspiration to design a whole new class of smart robotic devicesIn this one, CONOR WALSH discusses how a wearable robotic exosuit or soft robotic glove can assist people with mobility impairments, as well as how the goal to create real-world applications drives his research approach.In part one, RADHIKA NAGPAL talks about her work Inspired by social insects and multicellular systems, including the TERMES robots for collective construction of 3D structures, and the KILOBOT thousand-robot swarm. She also speaks candidly about the challenges faced by women in the engineering and computer science fields.In part two, ROBERT WOOD discusses new manufacturing techniques that are enabling popup and soft robots. His team’s ROBO-BEE is the first insect-sized winged robot to demonstrate controlled flight.The mission of the Wyss Institute is to: Transform healthcare, industry, and the environment by emulating the way nature builds, with a focus on technology development and its translation into products and therapies that will have an impact on the world in which we live. Their work is disruptive not only in terms of science but also in how they stretch the usual boundaries of academia.http://wyss.harvard.edu/- See more at: DISRUPTIVE: BIO-INSPIRED ROBOTICS Radhika Nagpal Interviewhttp://temcnally.podomatic.com/entry/2015-07-30T21_32_52-07_00DISRUPTIVE: BIO-INSPIRED ROBOTICS Robert Wood Interview http://temcnally.podomatic.com/entry/2015-07-30T21_37_41-07_00Conor Walsh's interview transcripthttp://aworldthatjustmightwork.com/2015/07/auto-draft-18/

27mins

31 Jul 2015

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DISRUPTIVE: BIO-INSPIRED ROBOTICS (1) RADHIKA NAGPAL, (2) ROBERT WOOD, and (3) CONOR WALSH

Free Forum with Terrence McNally

Welcome to the second episode of my new monthly podcast series produced with Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering.DISRUPTIVE: BIO-INSPIRED ROBOTICS features three separate interviews with (1) RADHIKA NAGPAL, (2) ROBERT WOOD, and (3) CONOR WALSH. From insects in your backyard, to creatures in the sea, to what you see in the mirror, engineers and scientists at Wyss are drawing inspiration to design a whole new class of smart robotic devicesIn this one, ROBERT WOOD discusses new manufacturing techniques that are enabling popup and soft robots. His team’s ROBO-BEE is the first insect-sized winged robot to demonstrate controlled flight.In part one, RADHIKA NAGPAL talks about her work Inspired by social insects and multicellular systems, including the TERMES robots for collective construction of 3D structures, and the KILOBOT thousand-robot swarm. She also speaks candidly about the challenges faced by women in the engineering and computer science fields.In part three, CONOR WALSH discusses how a wearable robotic exosuit or soft robotic glove could assist people with mobility impairments, as well as how the goal to create real-world applications drives his research approach.The mission of the Wyss Institute is to: Transform healthcare, industry, and the environment by emulating the way nature builds, with a focus on technology development and its translation into products and therapies that will have an impact on the world in which we live. Their work is disruptive not only in terms of science but also in how they stretch the usual boundaries of academia.http://wyss.harvard.edu/- See more at: DISRUPTIVE: BIO-INSPIRED ROBOTICS Radhika Nagpal Interviewhttp://temcnally.podomatic.com/entry/2015-07-30T21_32_52-07_00DISRUPTIVE: BIO-INSPIRED ROBOTICS Conor Walsh Interview http://temcnally.podomatic.com/entry/2015-07-30T22_01_42-07_00Robert Wood's interview transcripthttp://aworldthatjustmightwork.com/2015/07/auto-draft-17/

23mins

31 Jul 2015

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DISRUPTIVE: BIO-INSPIRED ROBOTICS (1) RADHIKA NAGPAL, (2) ROBERT WOOD, TICS (1) and (3) CONOR WALSH

Free Forum with Terrence McNally

Welcome to the second episode of my new monthly podcast series produced with Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering.DISRUPTIVE: BIO-INSPIRED ROBOTICS features three separate interviews with (1) RADHIKA NAGPAL, (2) ROBERT WOOD, and (3) CONOR WALSH. From insects in your backyard, to creatures in the sea, to what you see in the mirror, engineers and scientists at Wyss are drawing inspiration to design a whole new class of smart robotic devicesIn this one, RADHIKA NAGPAL talks about her work Inspired by social insects and multicellular systems, including the TERMES robots for collective construction of 3D structures, and the KILOBOT thousand-robot swarm. She also speaks candidly about the challenges faced by women in the engineering and computer science fields.In part two, ROBERT WOOD discusses new manufacturing techniques that are enabling popup and soft robots. His team’s ROBO-BEE is the first insect-sized winged robot to demonstrate controlled flight.In part three, CONOR WALSH discusses how a wearable robotic exosuit or soft robotic glove could assist people with mobility impairments, as well as how the goal to create real-world applications drives his research approach.The mission of the Wyss Institute is to: Transform healthcare, industry, and the environment by emulating the way nature builds, with a focus on technology development and its translation into products and therapies that will have an impact on the world in which we live. Their work is disruptive not only in terms of science but also in how they stretch the usual boundaries of academia.http://wyss.harvard.edu/-See more at: DISRUPTIVE: BIO-INSPIRED ROBOTICS Robert Wood's Interview http://temcnally.podomatic.com/entry/2015-07-30T21_37_41-07_00DISRUPTIVE: BIO-INSPIRED ROBOTICS Conor Walsh's Interviewhttp://temcnally.podomatic.com/entry/2015-07-30T22_01_42-07_00Radhika Nagpal's interview transcripthttp://aworldthatjustmightwork.com/2015/07/auto-draft-16/

55mins

31 Jul 2015