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Michael Barnett

32 Podcast Episodes

Latest 2 May 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Michael Barnett: Uncertainty remains around light rail network in Auckland

Early Edition with Kate Hawkesby

There's disappointment Auckland's fresh plan for light rail has turned out not to be a shovel ready project.The Government is starting from scratch, involving Aucklanders in a six-month process to thrash out a plan.It was one of Labour's central promises at the 2017 election.Auckland Business Chamber chief executive Michael Barnett told Kate Hawkesby there's still an element of uncertainty."We've been talking and consulting for three or four years, but all that's happening is the Government is going back to the drawing board."Barnett says the fact people will have to wait even longer, is a concern."It's not just affecting businesses, but people will be waiting for decisions, and waiting to see how their businesses and lives will be affected."LISTEN ABOVE

3mins

31 Mar 2021

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EOXS Podcast - Stories on Steel: Michael Barnett - Grand Steel (#15)

EOXS Podcast: Stories on Steel

On this episode, joining us is Mr. Michael Barnett, President & Chief Operating Officer at Grand Steel. He dives deep into what it takes to work in the Steel Industry and what he looks for in the people when hiring. In today's competitive world, while younger generations are struggling to get a degree to stay ahead, it's good to know that the steel industry values not your educational qualifications, but something much more valuable: knowledge and the ability to do the job and get things done!

34mins

17 Mar 2021

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Michael Barnett: Government under fire for delay in alert level announcement

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

A top business leader has taken aim at Jacinda Ardern and her Cabinet - they already know if Auckland will come out of level 2 this weekend, but they're not telling the public until late Friday morning.The prime minister and top members of her Cabinet have already made their decision on a move to level 1- they met yesterday, 13 days after the last community case - but Ardern won't reveal the decision until 11.30 this morning.Auckland Business Chamber chief executive Michael Barnett said the public and businesses should have been told promptly."This would have enabled businesses time to get ready to welcome customers and visitors back and make the most of having a full weekend of trade to make up for some of the crippling losses from level 3 and 2 restrictions."And Barnett told Newstalk ZB's Mike Hosking this morning he couldn't work out the 11.30am timing. "If you told us yesterday there would have been more winners. So tell us why you didn't tell us yesterday."I can't work it out. I look at 11.30 today - it's better than four o'clock on a Friday afternoon, but the sector that's been most vocal that's been most impacted is the hospitality and the restaurant sector. Most of these guys it's been soft for them this year and it's been a disaster over the last couple of weeks so it's an opportunity for them to get started again, it's an opportunity for the government to get some return on the money invested in America's Cup, and we've got nothing until today, at 11.30."The outcome is likely to be a shift to alert level 1 – Covid-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said he was "optimistic" that Auckland would be at alert level 1 this weekend.

3mins

11 Mar 2021

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Michael Barnett: Alert level change expected to hit Auckland businesses hard

The Sunday Session with Francesca Rudkin

Aucklanders are waking up this morning to alert level 3, and the rest of the country to level 2.That means a large portion of businesses - hairdressers, gyms and cinemas, among others - will keep their doors shut and operations on hold as trading restrictions are re-implemented in the country's most populous city.Supermarkets, dairies, petrol stations, butchers and greengrocers will remain open to shoppers as normal, while cafes, eateries and restaurants move to takeaways only.The move back to alert level 3 for Auckland-based businesses will no doubt come as a blow and will have knock-on effects for those in other regions of the country.Finance Minister Grant Robertson has confirmed that $500 million in wage subsidies will be available to businesses that need financial support.The Auckland Chamber of Commerce says it is disappointed for the sectors that will be "adversely affected" by the upgrade in alert levels, but it says the public needs to do its part to keep Covid-19 out of the community."Government cannot be blamed for having to take this drastic action and nor be accused of failing to contain this outbreak. We have let the Government and ourselves down. We were trusted to follow the rules and do what is right to keep us safe. Those rules were broken and now we all have to live with the consequences," Michael Barnett, chief executive of the Auckland Chamber, said.Earlier this week it was revealed that a family member of a confirmed positive Covid case linked to the Papatoetoe High School cluster had failed to follow Ministry of Health guidelines and had attended work at KFC on multiple occasions.Yesterday, another case in the South Auckland community was confirmed and it was found that the person had also failed to self-isolate, instead attending the Manukau Institute of Technology for three days: February 22, 25 and 26.The person is a household contact of a student from Papatoetoe High School who had returned three negative tests and was asymptomatic.Barnett said business and the community would be "bitterly disappointed" that Auckland had been plunged back into a level 3 lockdown for seven days while the rest of New Zealand reverts to level 2 as health authorities work to contain the latest community outbreak.He described the upgrade in alert levels as a massive blow to New Zealand's recovering economy."It is frustrating and a blow to recovery, but we will rally and accept the help put in place to save jobs. Businesses will be eligible for both the wage subsidy and the resurgence payments to mitigate some of the costs and liabilities from having to limit activities for the next week in such short order even though we all could see the warning signs," he said."The most helpful thing business and business leaders can do for their people and families is to encourage and provide support to ensure they all comply with the rules of hand washing, social distancing, QR code scanning, and most importantly, if you are unwell, are identified as a close contact or contact, or have visited any of the locations identified as places of interest by the authorities, stay home, call the Healthline, follow the instructions on getting a test and remain at home in isolation until you are told you are clear."The sooner everyone followed the rules, the sooner the country, particularly Auckland, could get back on track and "reclaim our lives and livelihoods", he said.The Restaurant Association said the change in alert levels was a "major blow" for the hospitality industry that was already "struggling for survival"."This is another major blow for our industry who are already struggling to recover from the compounded impact of changes to alert levels and border closures. With borders closed, our revenues continue to suffer and these changes of alert levels are incredibly difficult to manage," Restaurant Association chief executive Marisa Bidois said."Sunday is a big day for hospo and our businesses will have stocked up...

4mins

27 Feb 2021

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Michael Barnett: Papatoetoe Covid cluster dents Auckland's business confidence

Early Edition with Kate Hawkesby

Auckland's Papatoetoe Covid cluster has dented business confidence, and taken a massive slice out of businesses' bottom lines.New figures from Paymark show the main five days of the outbreak have cost retailers about $50 million dollars.Most of that lost spending was in Auckland, where Alert Level Three restrictions forced all cafes, restaurants and other non-essential businesses to close.Auckland Business Chamber chief executive Michael Barnett told Kate Hawkesby many business people were feeling upbeat until the lockdown struck.He says they started the year feeling confident and ready for a new start, but the lockdown has knocked them back.Papatoetoe High School will undergo a deep clean today, and contact tracing and testing is continuing.LISTEN ABOVE

3mins

25 Feb 2021

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Michael Barnett: How much the latest lockdown could cost New Zealand

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

The re-emergence of lockdown measures could sap over $150 million out of the economy - and an Auckland business leader says firms need to know the Government will look after them.Based on cost estimates developed by ASB during the previous lockdown, having Auckland at alert level 3 and the rest of the country at alert level 2 costs the economy about $440 million per week - or 0.15 per cent of GDP.With the current lockdown set to last three days, the cost of the lockdown will be around $188 million lost to the economy.This will only increase should the lockdown be extended beyond the initial three-day precautionary measures.The fact that firms have been through this before should prepare us for this latest lockdown development, says Auckland Business Chamber chief executive Michael Barnett."Businesses should have had a plan in place, they should have been expecting that at some point we were going to come back here."However, he said some businesses were still facing economic hardship from the last round of lockdown and was calling for a fresh subsidy to weather this latest situation."I think government should send a signal to business that they're going to look after them."Barnett said hospitality and food and beverage firms were running "close to the line" and this latest snap lockdown wasn't going to help.He said businesses should have a plan to manage this and focus on their digital platforms to bring money in.He expected the cost to be "heavy" for some."Many businesses took out loans last year, they were in a process of meeting obligations of those loans and they're going to have no income but they're going to have the cost of staff. The quicker the Government send a signal that there's going to be a subsidy or there's going to be support, the greater the confidence that business can get through."Barnett said it was now a matter of holding out for the vaccine."What business has to do is not see this as a disaster but make the three days work. They should have a plan to manage this and they should be looking at how can they use the digital platforms that they've probably created over the last six to 12 months, communicate well with their customers and keep their businesses alive."How much a lockdown costsLast August, ASB modelled a range of costs based on different alert levels.They range from a weekly economic cost of $1.6 billion (or 0.54 per cent of GDP) if the whole country went back into level 4 lockdown, to $166m (or 0.06 per cent of GDP) per week with the whole country at level 2.The return to higher alert levels would have uneven impacts throughout the economy, Smith said."New Zealand was operating at about 95 per cent of capacity at level 1, with the shift to alert level 2 and 3 seeing capacity utilisation fall to anywhere from 80 per cent to 92 per cent of economy-wide capacity," ASB senior economist Mark Smith said at the time.Sectors that would be particularly affected by a shift back up alert levels included accommodation and food services.Having Auckland in level 3 carries enormous economic weight.According to official estimates, Auckland accounts for broadly 38 per cent of NZ's GDP and around 33 per cent of employment and one-third of the nationwide population.Brad Olsen, senior economist at Infometrics, previously told the Herald that the restrictions placed on Auckland would disrupt much of its workforce."By our estimate, around about 28 per cent of Auckland's workforce cannot operate under level 3, that's about 250,000 jobs. We're likely to see that number of people not operating," Olsen said.In August Olsen estimated the cost of level 3 in Auckland at around $60m to $69 million over a three-day period.While economies do take a short-term hit from lockdowns, numerous studies have shown that stricter conditions pay off in the longer run.An IMF study of 52 countries at the end of last year found that a stringent lockdown leads to a reduction in cumulated infections of about 4...

3mins

14 Feb 2021

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Holistic life journeys: Ralph Cree and Sanji - Osho Rajneesh, trillium, michael Barnett energy work

Evolving Spiritual Practice

This conversation is part of a series exploring the personal journeys people have taken with a holistic approach to transformational practices integrating body, heart, mind and spirit. In this episode I speak with Sanji about her journey. Topics covered are: life as a Sanyasin at the Rajneesh community in India, whether Gurus are relevant in our contemporary era, subtle energy massage with Michael Barnett, Bob Moore, PsychoSynthesis, Trillium Awakening, Spiral Dynamics, and what lies beyond waking up to the Ground of Being.  For more information on Sanji’s work please visit www.trilliumawakening.org where you can see her teacher bio For more information about my work please visit www.bodyheartmindspirit.co.uk To hear more of my music please visit my soundcloud page https://soundcloud.com/ralphcree My YouTube channel is https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUfQp5jM16pPB7QX2zmMYbQ My Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/bodyheartmindspirituk/

1hr 39mins

8 Feb 2021

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Michael Barnett: Should the government be giving out free money to businesses affected by Covid?

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

It's hard to say no to free money - but should the government be giving it out?The head of Kiwibank has suggested the government look into grants rather than loans, in order to help businesses.He says businesses are reluctant to take out loans because of risk, tricky application processes, and complicated conditions.Auckland Business Chamber boss Michael Barnett told Mike Hosking it's a bad idea to hand out money without a rigorous process behind it.“A grant option could have been made available, but those should have been applied for instead of given out, like they were in Australia.”LISTEN ABOVE

3mins

28 Oct 2020

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Building a Family Legacy with Michael Barnett

The Cashflow Contractor

Who is Michael Barnett, and what was his path to being a business owner? (1:24) When should you get lawyers involved in a family business? (3:26) What was life like when he took over the company? 2012 - 2016: Growing the company, focused on sales, no idea how much money was in the bank. (6:12) What caused his vision of the company to change? What were the biggest issues he faced as a new business owner who was trying to build and grow a legacy? (7:18) How was he prospecting for new customers? (9:14) 2017: Focused his sights on commercial work because there was more money in it. (11:22) They hit a million in sales, but started to feel some cashflow problems. (12:46) Even though they grew in 2017, they lost money. So, Michael started talking to other business owners and took a mastermind class with Martin (14:41) Bookkeeping 101: How to use good books to make decisions. (17:16) Becoming a business owner, not just an electrician Being a business owner is fun. (18:43) They started focusing on service work because it had 40% margins without putting in any work to improve processes. (24:06) BUT, Michael DID improve the service processes. Here’s how. (25:30) Michael’s mentality through the changes? “Jump. We’ll build the wings on the way down.” (30:18) The power of getting rid of the hourly rate and charging a service fee. (34:48) How Michael sets his costs AND protects his customers. (36:30) How technology supports his business. (38:30) What was the key to turning around his business? (42:58) The evolution of his vision. (45:28) What’s Michael’s advice for others who want success? (47:35) Ethan’s Insights — Ethan’s favorite moments from the interview. (49:25) Quotable Moments “If you’re cheap enough, you can get as much work as you want, but you won’t be around.” — Michael “We broke a million, so where’s the money?” — Michael  “If you have 35 margins and you raise your prices 10, you can lose 22 of your business before you lose 1 penny of profit.” — M “Jump. We’ll build the wings on the way down.” — Michael “As a business owner, you have to make those leaps of faith all the time. Otherwise, you just stay stagnant, get in a rut, and you don’t improve. You miss out on opportunities and you don’t grow.” — K ResourcesThe Discount CalculatorMore from Michael Barnettelectrical.com Facebook Instagram LinkedIn Twitter More from Martin theprofitproblem.com annealbc.com martin@anealbc.com LinkedIn Facebook Instagram More from Khalil benali.com khalil@benali.com LinkedIn Facebook Instagram More from The Cashflow Contractor Subscribe to Our Newsletter Ask Us A Question Sign Up For A Free Consultation thecashflowcontractor.com info@thecashflowcontractor.com LinkedIn Facebook Instagram

53mins

20 Oct 2020

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Michael Barnett: Auckland Business Chamber wants to see change alert levels

The Mike Hosking Breakfast

High hopes for Auckland as the Prime Minister reveals if the country's Alert Levels will move today.Auckland is sitting at Level 2.5, with the rest of the country at Level Two.Auckland Business Chamber chief executive Michael Barnett told Mike Hosking  the city should go to a level that starts with one - even if it's one and a bit."There might be some constraints about sizes of audiences and so on, but really Auckland needs to be encouraged to make the best of this environment and start the road to recovery."

3mins

21 Sep 2020

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