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Dylan Schiemann Podcasts

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11 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Dylan Schiemann. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Dylan Schiemann, often where they are interviewed.

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11 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Dylan Schiemann. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Dylan Schiemann, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Dylan Schiemann on the Evolution of Dojo, Web Components and Trends in the Web Development Landscape

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In this podcast Charles Humble spoke to Dylan Schiemann, co-creator of Dojo and InfoQ’s JavaScript and Web Development lead editor, about the history and current state of Dojo, and key emerging trends in the JavaScript landscape today. Key topics include Dojo’s adoption of Typescript, web components, and client-side libraries such as Svelte and Stencil.

Why listen to this podcast:

- Modern Dojo (2.0 and upwards) is focussed on being a very small, opinionated reactive framework, but with a lot of the components you need to build a modern JavaScript application built in.
- The framework tries to align closely to standards, for example using Web Components extensively for UI components, alongside ES modules and promises. The use of standards, as well as the convergence towards the reactive programming model for web UI, has improved interoperability, though there are some limitations such as the lack of an easy way to share resources across web components.
- Dojo was one of the first frameworks to make the decision to switch to Typescript, though it took some time to make that transition. The switch was mainly motivated by TypeScript’s support for interfaces, but it wasn’t until Typescript 2.6 they felt able to ship Dojo 2.
- On the client side we’re paying close attention to Svelte and Stencil as two particularly interesting client-side frameworks.
- We’ve moved Web Components from early adopter to early majority on the trend report, based on the fact that all browsers accept IE now natively support it, but also large companies such as Apple, Nike and ESPN are deploying web components and their sites. Apple’s iTunes implementation, for example, now uses web components.

More on this: Quick scan our curated show notes on InfoQ https://bit.ly/2Qy75Jr
You can also subscribe to the InfoQ newsletter to receive weekly updates on the hottest topics from professional software development. bit.ly/24x3IVq

Subscribe: www.youtube.com/infoq
Like InfoQ on Facebook: bit.ly/2jmlyG8
Follow on Twitter: twitter.com/InfoQ
Follow on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/infoq
Check the landing page on InfoQ: https://bit.ly/2Qy75Jr
Mar 20 2020 · 32mins
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Event Founder Dylan Schiemann of HalfStack - Bring Authenticity To Your Events

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Dylan Schiemann, Founder and event organizer of HalfStack Conferences, talks with us about the importance of authenticity at their events. Dylan shares how HalfStack's thoughtful touches affect every aspect of their event from hand-lettered badges to booking local speakers for their event. We learn about how saying yes, and staying authentic has helped them grow the HalfStack Conference to 7 cities around the world while staying true to HalfStack's vision and community.

Learn more about HalfStack Conference:
Website: https://halfstackconf.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/halfstackconf/
Facebook: https://facebook.com/halfstackconf/

Follow Emamo:
Twitter: https://twitter.com/emamo
Instagram: https://instagram.com/hello_emamo/
Facebook: https://facebook.com/emamoapp/

Intro & Outro music: "Funk Game Loop" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Jan 20 2020 · 41mins

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027 - More javascript with Dylan Schiemann

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Hello from the internet!

In this episode we speak to Dylan Schiemann about more things Javascript.

Enjoy the show!
Sep 08 2019 · 34mins
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Episode 7 - Dylan Schiemann

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Dylan Schiemann is a professional conference speaker and the founder of Dojo Toolkit. He is one of those lucky human beings who does not get nervous before talks! He attributes this confidence to his early speaking experiences, which he tells us about in this episode.

Dylan also explains what conference talks, sales discussions and venture capital pitches have in common, and tells us how his own impressive conference talks have helped the success of Dojo Toolkit. He discusses why a speaker's ability to read and adjust to different audiences is key to a successful talk, and why he personally likes to give either one of the first or one of the last talks at a conference.

He also touches on why community is so important to him, and how this led him to start his Javascript meetup, HalfStack, which he still runs today.

Learn more about Dylan here.

To get a weekly dose of public speaking tips, information, videos of great talks, conference news, book reviews and more, sign up to the Voxgig newsletter.

View all show notes, links, and more brilliant public speaking resources at voxgig.com.

If you like what you hear on Fireside with Voxgig, don’t be shy―tell everyone! Use  #firesidewithvoxgig on your social media.

Dec 26 2018 · 32mins

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How To Build A Positive Culture with Dylan Schiemann.

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In this episode, we interviewed Dylan Schiemann, known Dojo, Comet and SitePen. SitePen is a fully remote company with +40 employees working mostly in US and UK. Dylan decided to go 100% remote in 2007. The team had good engineers located around the world and wanted to hire new ones that didn’t want to relocate. They saw the benefits of remote work and joined in.

In this episode, we talked to Dylan about, the benefits of going fully remote, creating great culture remote work/life balance, how SitePen deals with communication, technology tools, and the challenges that they face every time.

Show highlights? For Dylan it is critical to put a lot of emphasis on the remote team communication. He deals with this, by clustering time-zones, and creating amazing documentation. Dylan thinks is very important to maintain culture in the remote company. How he does this? Tune in to learn more and visit us at https://trackly.com/

Six-digit authorization code “582853”
Aug 13 2018 · 33mins
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MJS #033 Dylan Schiemann

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MJS 033: Dylan Schiemann

Today's episode is a My JavaScript Story with Dylan Schiemann. Dylan talked about his contributions to the JavaScript community to what JavaScript is back in 2004. Listen to learn more about Dylan!

[01:10] – Introduction to Dylan Schiemann

Dylan was on episode 62 of JavaScript Jabber, which was about 4 years ago. We had him on to talk about the Dojo Toolkit.

[02:00] – How did you get into programming?

When Dylan was 7 or 8 years old, he and his father took basic programming class together. In Junior high, probably mid-1980’s, he received his first Commodore 64 computer. He picked up the Programmer’s Reference Guide, toppled on Assembly, and tried to write data to a tape drive. It got updated to a floppy drive. And then in high school, he took some Pascal classes. He learned the basics - ranging from BASIC, Pascal, and to Assembly.

[03:00] – How did you get into JavaScript?

As an undergraduate, Dylan studied Chemistry and Mathematics. He did some basic HTML and discovered the web roughly when he was a junior year in college. And then, he went to graduate school and studied Physical Chemistry at UCLA. He was studying the topology and reality of quasi-two-dimensional phone. If you imagine a bunch of beer bubbles at the top of a glass, and you spin it around really quickly, you watch how the bubbles rearrange as force is applied to it. He wanted to put his experiments on the web so he started learning this new language that had just been invented called JavaScript. So, he dropped out of graduate school a few years later. Eight years after that point in time, it was possible to show his experiments with Dojo and SVG.

[04:25] – How did you get into Dojo and the other technologies?

SitePen

Right after grad school, Dylan helped start a company called SitePen. That let him really learn how JavaScript works. He started doing some consulting work. And he started working with Alex Russell, who had a project called netWindows at the time, which is a predecessor to any JavaScript framework that most people have worked with.

Dojo

Dylan got together and decided to create a next generation version of the HTML toolkit, which ended up becoming Dojo back in 2004. Things that they created back then are now part of the language - asynchronous patterns such as Promises, or even modules, widgets, which led to the web components pack. Over the years, they’ve built on that and done various utilities for testing and optimizing applications.

[06:20] – Ideas that stood the test of time

A lot of the things that Dylan and his team did in Dojo were on the right path but first versions ended up iterating before they’ve met their way into the language. Other things are timing. They were there very early and but to tell people in 2005 and 2006 that you need to architect the front-end application met some confusion of why you would want to do that. According to him, they never created Dojo to say that they want to create the world’s leading framework.

[07:45] – JavaScript

Dylan no longer answers the question of, “Oh, JavaScript, you mean, Java?”

The expectations of 2004 were the hope of making something that might work in a browser. The expectation today is we are competing against every platform and trying to create the best possible software in the world, and do it in a way that’s distributable everywhere in the browser. The capabilities have grown. There are audio, video and real-time capabilities. They were ways to do those things but they were brutal and fragile. And now, we have real engineering solutions to many of those things but there are still going to be ways to do this. There were few people who are interested in this and maybe this wasn’t even their day job. But now, literally hundreds and thousands of engineers who write code in JavaScript every day.

Picks

Dylan Schiemann

Charles Max Wood

Sep 06 2017 · 36mins
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JSJ 277: Dojo 2 with Dylan Schiemann and Kitson Kelly

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JSJ 277: Dojo 2 with Dylan Schiemann and Kitson Kelly

This episode of JavaScript Jabber features panelists Aimee Knight, Cory House, and Charles Max Wood. They talk with Dylan Schiemann and Kitson Kelly about Dojo 2.

[00:02:03] Introduction to Dylan Schiemann

Dylan is the CEO at Sitepen and co-founder of the Dojo Toolkit.

[00:02:22] Introduction to Kitson 

Kitson is the CTO at Sitepen and project lead for Dojo 2.

[00:02:43] Elevator Pitch for Dojo

Dojo 1 has been around forever. Started back in 2004 as a way to solve the challenge of "I want to build something cool in a browser." Promises and web components were inspired by or created by Dojo. It's been a huge influence on the web development community.

Dojo 2 is a ground up re-write with ES 2015, TypeScript and modern API's. It's a modernized framework for Enterprise applications.

[00:04:29] How is Dojo different from other frameworks?

There's a spectrum: small libraries like React with an ecosystem and community of things you add to it to Angular which is closer to the MV* framework with bi-directional data binding. Vue lands somewhere in the middle. Dojo 2 is also somewhere in the middle as well. It's written in TypeScript and has embraced the TypeScript experience.

[00:06:00] Did the Angular 2 move influence the Dojo 2 development and vice-versa?

Dojo 2 had moved to TypeScript and 2 days later Angular announced that they were going to TypeScript. Angular also moved very quickly through their BETA phase, which caused some challenges for the Angular community.

With Dojo 2, they didn't start the public discussion and BETA until they knew much better what was and wasn't going to change. They've also been talking about Dojo 2 for 6 or 7 years.

The update was held up by adoption of ES6 and other technologies.

Dojo 1 was also responsible for a lot of the low-level underpinning that Angular didn't have to innovate on. Dojo 2 was built around a mature understanding of how web applications are built now.

People doing Enterprise need a little more help and assistance from their framework. Dojo provides a much more feature rich set of capabilities.

Angular could have pushed much more of TypeScript's power through to the developer experience. Dojo much more fully adopts it.

It's also easier if all of your packages have the same version number.

Call out to Angular 4 vs Angular 2.

[00:12:44] AMD Modules

Why use AMD instead of ES6 modules?

You can use both. Dojo 2 was involved in the creation of UMD. James Burke created UMD while working on Dojo.

ES6 modules and module loading systems weren't entirely baked when Dojo 2 started to reach maturity, so they went with UMD. It's only been a few months since Safari implemented the ES6 module system. Firefox and friends are still playing catchup.

The Dojo CLI build tool uses webpack, so it's mostly invisible at this point.

So, at this point, should I be using UMD modules? or ES6? Is there an advantage to using AMD?

With TypeScript you'd use ES6 modules, but UMD modules can be loaded on the fly.

[00:16:00] Are you using Grunt?

Internally, for tasks we use Grunt. But for users, we have a CLI tool that wraps around Webpack.

For package builds and CI, Grunt is used.

[00:18:30] What is the focus on Enterprise all about?

There are a lot of different challenges and complexities to building Enterprise apps. Dojo was the first framework with internationalization, large data grids, SVG charts, etc. Dojo has spend a long time getting this right. Many other systems don't handle all the edge cases.

Internationalization in Angular 2 or 4 seems unfinished.

Most Dojo users are building for enterprises like banks and using the features that handle large amounts of data and handle those use cases better.

[00:21:05] If most application frameworks have the features you listed, is there a set of problems it excels at?

The Dojo team had a hard look at whether there was a need for their framework since many frameworks allow you to build great applications. Do we want to invest into something like this?

React has internationalization libraries. But you'll spend a lot of time deciding which library to use and how well it'll integrate with everything else. A tradeoff in decision fatigue.

In the Enterprise, development isn't sexy. It's necessary and wants to use boring but reliable technology. They like to throw bodies at a problem and that requires reliable frameworks with easily understood decision points.

Producing code right is a strong case for TypeScript and they pull that through to the end user.

Many frameworks start solving a small set of problems, become popular, and then bolt on what they need to solve everything else...

Dojo tried to make sure it had the entire package in a clear, easy to use way.

You can build great apps with most of the big frameworks out there. Dojo has been doing this for long enough that they know where to optimize for maintainability and performance.

[00:29:00] Where is Dojo's sweet spot? 

The Sitepen Blog series on picking a framework

The biggest reason for using Dojo over the years is the data grid component.

They also claim to have the best TypeScript web development experience.

You may also want a component based system with the composition hassles of React.

The composability of components where one team may write components that another uses is a big thing in Dojo where one person doesn't know the entire app you're working on.

Theming systems is another selling point for Dojo.

[00:34:10] Ending the framework wars

Try Dojo out and try out the grid component and then export it to your Angular or React app.

There are a lot of frameworks out there that do a great job for the people who use them. The focus is on how to build applications better, rather than beating out the competition.

Sitepen has build apps with Dojo 2, Angular, React, Dojo + Redux, etc.

[00:39:01] The Virtual DOM used by Dojo

2 years ago or so they were looking for a Virtual DOM library that was small and written in TypeScript. They settled on Maquette.

The more you deal with the DOM directly, the more complex your components and libraries become.

Makes things simpler for cases like server side rendering getting fleshed out in BETA 3.

It also allows you to move toward something like React Native and WebVR components that aren't coupled to the DOM.

They moved away from RxJS because they only wanted observables and shimmed in (or polyfilled) the ES-Next implementation instead of getting the rest of the RxJS  that they're not using.

[00:46:40] What's coming next?

They're finishing Dojo 2. They're polishing the system for build UI components and architecture and structuring the app. They plan to release before the end of the year.

They're also wrapping up development on the Data Grid, which only renders what shows on the screen plus a little instead of millions of rows.

[00:49:08] Testing

They've got intern.

It pulls together unit testing, functional testing, continuous integration hooks, accessibility testing, etc.

It's rewritten in TypeScript to take advantage of modern JavaScript.

The Dojo CLI uses intern as the default test framework.

Kitson build the test-extras library to help with Dojo testing with intern.

Dojo Links

Picks

Cory

Aimee

Chuck

Dylan

Kitson

Sep 06 2017 · 1hr 2mins
Episode artwork

JSJ 277: Dojo 2 with Dylan Schiemann and Kitson Kelly

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JSJ 277: Dojo 2 with Dylan Schiemann and Kitson Kelly

This episode of JavaScript Jabber features panelists Aimee Knight, Cory House, and Charles Max Wood. They talk with Dylan Schiemann and Kitson Kelly about Dojo 2.

[00:02:03] Introduction to Dylan Schiemann

Dylan is the CEO at Sitepen and co-founder of the Dojo Toolkit.

[00:02:22] Introduction to Kitson 

Kitson is the CTO at Sitepen and project lead for Dojo 2.

[00:02:43] Elevator Pitch for Dojo

Dojo 1 has been around forever. Started back in 2004 as a way to solve the challenge of "I want to build something cool in a browser." Promises and web components were inspired by or created by Dojo. It's been a huge influence on the web development community.

Dojo 2 is a ground up re-write with ES 2015, TypeScript and modern API's. It's a modernized framework for Enterprise applications.

[00:04:29] How is Dojo different from other frameworks?

There's a spectrum: small libraries like React with an ecosystem and community of things you add to it to Angular which is closer to the MV* framework with bi-directional data binding. Vue lands somewhere in the middle. Dojo 2 is also somewhere in the middle as well. It's written in TypeScript and has embraced the TypeScript experience.

[00:06:00] Did the Angular 2 move influence the Dojo 2 development and vice-versa?

Dojo 2 had moved to TypeScript and 2 days later Angular announced that they were going to TypeScript. Angular also moved very quickly through their BETA phase, which caused some challenges for the Angular community.

With Dojo 2, they didn't start the public discussion and BETA until they knew much better what was and wasn't going to change. They've also been talking about Dojo 2 for 6 or 7 years.

The update was held up by adoption of ES6 and other technologies.

Dojo 1 was also responsible for a lot of the low-level underpinning that Angular didn't have to innovate on. Dojo 2 was built around a mature understanding of how web applications are built now.

People doing Enterprise need a little more help and assistance from their framework. Dojo provides a much more feature rich set of capabilities.

Angular could have pushed much more of TypeScript's power through to the developer experience. Dojo much more fully adopts it.

It's also easier if all of your packages have the same version number.

Call out to Angular 4 vs Angular 2.

[00:12:44] AMD Modules

Why use AMD instead of ES6 modules?

You can use both. Dojo 2 was involved in the creation of UMD. James Burke created UMD while working on Dojo.

ES6 modules and module loading systems weren't entirely baked when Dojo 2 started to reach maturity, so they went with UMD. It's only been a few months since Safari implemented the ES6 module system. Firefox and friends are still playing catchup.

The Dojo CLI build tool uses webpack, so it's mostly invisible at this point.

So, at this point, should I be using UMD modules? or ES6? Is there an advantage to using AMD?

With TypeScript you'd use ES6 modules, but UMD modules can be loaded on the fly.

[00:16:00] Are you using Grunt?

Internally, for tasks we use Grunt. But for users, we have a CLI tool that wraps around Webpack.

For package builds and CI, Grunt is used.

[00:18:30] What is the focus on Enterprise all about?

There are a lot of different challenges and complexities to building Enterprise apps. Dojo was the first framework with internationalization, large data grids, SVG charts, etc. Dojo has spend a long time getting this right. Many other systems don't handle all the edge cases.

Internationalization in Angular 2 or 4 seems unfinished.

Most Dojo users are building for enterprises like banks and using the features that handle large amounts of data and handle those use cases better.

[00:21:05] If most application frameworks have the features you listed, is there a set of problems it excels at?

The Dojo team had a hard look at whether there was a need for their framework since many frameworks allow you to build great applications. Do we want to invest into something like this?

React has internationalization libraries. But you'll spend a lot of time deciding which library to use and how well it'll integrate with everything else. A tradeoff in decision fatigue.

In the Enterprise, development isn't sexy. It's necessary and wants to use boring but reliable technology. They like to throw bodies at a problem and that requires reliable frameworks with easily understood decision points.

Producing code right is a strong case for TypeScript and they pull that through to the end user.

Many frameworks start solving a small set of problems, become popular, and then bolt on what they need to solve everything else...

Dojo tried to make sure it had the entire package in a clear, easy to use way.

You can build great apps with most of the big frameworks out there. Dojo has been doing this for long enough that they know where to optimize for maintainability and performance.

[00:29:00] Where is Dojo's sweet spot? 

The Sitepen Blog series on picking a framework

The biggest reason for using Dojo over the years is the data grid component.

They also claim to have the best TypeScript web development experience.

You may also want a component based system with the composition hassles of React.

The composability of components where one team may write components that another uses is a big thing in Dojo where one person doesn't know the entire app you're working on.

Theming systems is another selling point for Dojo.

[00:34:10] Ending the framework wars

Try Dojo out and try out the grid component and then export it to your Angular or React app.

There are a lot of frameworks out there that do a great job for the people who use them. The focus is on how to build applications better, rather than beating out the competition.

Sitepen has build apps with Dojo 2, Angular, React, Dojo + Redux, etc.

[00:39:01] The Virtual DOM used by Dojo

2 years ago or so they were looking for a Virtual DOM library that was small and written in TypeScript. They settled on Maquette.

The more you deal with the DOM directly, the more complex your components and libraries become.

Makes things simpler for cases like server side rendering getting fleshed out in BETA 3.

It also allows you to move toward something like React Native and WebVR components that aren't coupled to the DOM.

They moved away from RxJS because they only wanted observables and shimmed in (or polyfilled) the ES-Next implementation instead of getting the rest of the RxJS  that they're not using.

[00:46:40] What's coming next?

They're finishing Dojo 2. They're polishing the system for build UI components and architecture and structuring the app. They plan to release before the end of the year.

They're also wrapping up development on the Data Grid, which only renders what shows on the screen plus a little instead of millions of rows.

[00:49:08] Testing

They've got intern.

It pulls together unit testing, functional testing, continuous integration hooks, accessibility testing, etc.

It's rewritten in TypeScript to take advantage of modern JavaScript.

The Dojo CLI uses intern as the default test framework.

Kitson build the test-extras library to help with Dojo testing with intern.

Dojo Links

Picks

Cory

Aimee

Chuck

Dylan

Kitson

Sep 06 2017 · 1hr 2mins
Episode artwork

062 JSJ Dojo with Dylan Schiemann

Play
Read more
Panel

Dylan Schiemann (twitter github blog)
Jamison Dance (twitter github blog)
Joe Eames (twitter github blog)
AJ O’Neal (twitter github blog)
Charles Max Wood (twitter github Teach Me To Code Rails Ramp Up)

Discussion
00:57 - Dylan Schiemann Introduction
The Dojo Toolkit
CEO of SitePen

01:14 - Dojo
TD Ameritrade
The Wall Street Journal
JPMorgan Chase & Co
TD Bank
voro.com
Esri

04:40 - Why is Dojo relevant today?
Peter Higgins: #dadt (Dojo already did that)

07:00 - AMD and RequireJS
Performance Benefits
CommonJS

10:34 - Dijit
Form Controls
Layout Widgets
Other Widgets (i.e. grids, rich text editor controls, trees, etc.)
Polymer

15:32 - Browser Support
The Awesome Bar
Removing Code
Aspect-oriented Programming

20:01 - Dojo 2
Dojo Mobile
Responsive Dijits
Local Storage
Better Grid Widgets
Cleaner APIs

32:52 - Marketing Dojo
Dojo Tutorials
Good APIs
Demos
Target Environments

27:55 - Graded Support
Graded Browser Support - YUI Library

30:56 - Maintaining the old version while moving ahead with the new version
33:01 - Strict Mode
dojo.declare

34:15 - Dojo and Node.js
dojo/request

36:20 - The Dojo Foundation
lodash
The Intern

40:21 - Testing
D.O.H.: Dojo Objective Harness
Sauce Labs
Chai

42:56 - Charting and Graphing & Vector Graphics
DojoX
voro.com
GFX
D3
Raphaël

46:41 - The History of Dojo and Prototype

Picks

Sexism in Video Games - This Female Gamer is Fed Up / from a woman's view / woman / Rape is in Grand Theft Auto Game (AJ)
My Fair Lady (AJ)
Moon (Jamison)
Dr. Dog (Jamison)
Warhammer Quest (Joe)
Knights of the Old Republic (Joe)
Ruins by Orson Scott Card (Joe)
AngularJS Fundamentals (Joe’s Pluralsight Course) (Joe)
Commit (Chuck)
Authority | Nathan Barry (Chuck)
The Intern (Dylan)
FrozenJS (Dylan)
hammer throw: 1986 Youri Sedykh's World Record Series (Dylan)
Kundalini Yoga (Dylan)
Arcosanti (Dylan)
Ubud, Bali (Dylan)
Insadong, Seoul, South Korea (Dylan)

Next Week
Burnout
Transcript
JAMISON:  This is my voice.

CHUCK:  You keep it with you at all times, don’t you?

JAMISON:  I do. Unless I go to a rock concert or something. Then I leave it there.
[Hosting and bandwidth provided by the Blue Box Group. Check them out at Bluebox.net.] 

[This episode is sponsored by Component One, makers of Wijmo. If you need stunning UI elements or awesome graphs and charts, then go to Wijmo.com and check them out.] 

CHUCK:  Hey everybody, and welcome to Episode 62 of the JavaScript Jabber Show. This week on our panel, we have Jamison Dance.

JAMISON:  Hi, guys.

CHUCK:  Joe Eames.

JOE:  Hey there.

CHUCK:  AJ O’Neal.

AJ:  Not coming at you live. Not at all.

CHUCK:  I’m Charles Max Wood from DevChat.tv and we have a special guest this week. That’s Dylan Schiemann. So, do you want to introduce yourself real quick, Dylan?

DYLAN:  Sure. Thanks Charles. I’m Dylan. I’m one of the founders of an open source project called the Dojo Toolkit. I’m also the CEO at SitePen, a company that builds web apps and provides JavaScript training and support.

CHUCK:  Awesome. Dojo’s been around for a long time, hasn’t it?

DYLAN:  Nine years.

CHUCK:  Nine years.

DYLAN:  Oh, yeah. Three lifetimes in the Internet age, I guess.

CHUCK:  Does that make it older than jQuery?

DYLAN:  It does, yes. JQuery, I think, started about seven years ago, maybe. Six or seven years ago.

CHUCK:  I remember seeing a couple of websites built in Dojo way back in the day. I don’t remember exactly which ones they were. For some reason, I got the impression that it was a framework, but it’s more of a toolkit. It’s much more like jQuery than it is like, say, Backbone or Ember or any of those.

DYLAN:  It’s kind of everything. You can use it as a simple toolkit like jQuery. You have DOM manipulation,
Jun 07 2013 · 1hr 1min
Episode artwork

062 JSJ Dojo with Dylan Schiemann

Play
Read more
Panel

Dylan Schiemann (twitter github blog)
Jamison Dance (twitter github blog)
Joe Eames (twitter github blog)
AJ O’Neal (twitter github blog)
Charles Max Wood (twitter github Teach Me To Code Rails Ramp Up)

Discussion
00:57 - Dylan Schiemann Introduction
The Dojo Toolkit
CEO of SitePen

01:14 - Dojo
TD Ameritrade
The Wall Street Journal
JPMorgan Chase & Co
TD Bank
voro.com
Esri

04:40 - Why is Dojo relevant today?
Peter Higgins: #dadt (Dojo already did that)

07:00 - AMD and RequireJS
Performance Benefits
CommonJS

10:34 - Dijit
Form Controls
Layout Widgets
Other Widgets (i.e. grids, rich text editor controls, trees, etc.)
Polymer

15:32 - Browser Support
The Awesome Bar
Removing Code
Aspect-oriented Programming

20:01 - Dojo 2
Dojo Mobile
Responsive Dijits
Local Storage
Better Grid Widgets
Cleaner APIs

32:52 - Marketing Dojo
Dojo Tutorials
Good APIs
Demos
Target Environments

27:55 - Graded Support
Graded Browser Support - YUI Library

30:56 - Maintaining the old version while moving ahead with the new version
33:01 - Strict Mode
dojo.declare

34:15 - Dojo and Node.js
dojo/request

36:20 - The Dojo Foundation
lodash
The Intern

40:21 - Testing
D.O.H.: Dojo Objective Harness
Sauce Labs
Chai

42:56 - Charting and Graphing & Vector Graphics
DojoX
voro.com
GFX
D3
Raphaël

46:41 - The History of Dojo and Prototype

Picks

Sexism in Video Games - This Female Gamer is Fed Up / from a woman's view / woman / Rape is in Grand Theft Auto Game (AJ)
My Fair Lady (AJ)
Moon (Jamison)
Dr. Dog (Jamison)
Warhammer Quest (Joe)
Knights of the Old Republic (Joe)
Ruins by Orson Scott Card (Joe)
AngularJS Fundamentals (Joe’s Pluralsight Course) (Joe)
Commit (Chuck)
Authority | Nathan Barry (Chuck)
The Intern (Dylan)
FrozenJS (Dylan)
hammer throw: 1986 Youri Sedykh's World Record Series (Dylan)
Kundalini Yoga (Dylan)
Arcosanti (Dylan)
Ubud, Bali (Dylan)
Insadong, Seoul, South Korea (Dylan)

Next Week
Burnout
Transcript
JAMISON:  This is my voice.

CHUCK:  You keep it with you at all times, don’t you?

JAMISON:  I do. Unless I go to a rock concert or something. Then I leave it there.
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[This episode is sponsored by Component One, makers of Wijmo. If you need stunning UI elements or awesome graphs and charts, then go to Wijmo.com and check them out.] 

CHUCK:  Hey everybody, and welcome to Episode 62 of the JavaScript Jabber Show. This week on our panel, we have Jamison Dance.

JAMISON:  Hi, guys.

CHUCK:  Joe Eames.

JOE:  Hey there.

CHUCK:  AJ O’Neal.

AJ:  Not coming at you live. Not at all.

CHUCK:  I’m Charles Max Wood from DevChat.tv and we have a special guest this week. That’s Dylan Schiemann. So, do you want to introduce yourself real quick, Dylan?

DYLAN:  Sure. Thanks Charles. I’m Dylan. I’m one of the founders of an open source project called the Dojo Toolkit. I’m also the CEO at SitePen, a company that builds web apps and provides JavaScript training and support.

CHUCK:  Awesome. Dojo’s been around for a long time, hasn’t it?

DYLAN:  Nine years.

CHUCK:  Nine years.

DYLAN:  Oh, yeah. Three lifetimes in the Internet age, I guess.

CHUCK:  Does that make it older than jQuery?

DYLAN:  It does, yes. JQuery, I think, started about seven years ago, maybe. Six or seven years ago.

CHUCK:  I remember seeing a couple of websites built in Dojo way back in the day. I don’t remember exactly which ones they were. For some reason, I got the impression that it was a framework, but it’s more of a toolkit. It’s much more like jQuery than it is like, say, Backbone or Ember or any of those.

DYLAN:  It’s kind of everything. You can use it as a simple toolkit like jQuery. You have DOM manipulation,
Jun 07 2013 · 1hr 1min
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