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Al Jaffee Podcasts

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8 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Al Jaffee. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Al Jaffee, often where they are interviewed.

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8 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Al Jaffee. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Al Jaffee, often where they are interviewed.

Updated daily with the latest episodes

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Mad Magazine's AL JAFFEE

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This October marks Al Jaffee reign as Mad Magazine’s longest running contributor, clocking in 59 years and over 479 issues. Since 1952, the comic book turned magazine infused a childish silliness with biting political depth and orignal artwork. By engaging readers to add their own “Snappy Answers to Stupid Questions,” and even mangling the magazine to solve the “Fold-In” picture riddle, Mad was one of the first enterprises to treat consumers as co-conspirators. The result was an entirely new forum for humor in an era when few questioned whether father really knows best. It’s allure for children and teenagers simultaneously fueled outrage from the FBI to Congress the collective imaginations of future comedy writers and cartoonists. Writers behind The Simpsons, The Daily Show, The Onion, and The Colbert Report credit Mad Magazine for inspiring them.

The sheer joy Jaffee’s work provides fans offers to fans is inverse proportion to what he and his three brothers experienced growing up. In his biography Al Jaffee’s Mad Life, co-authored by Mary-Lou Weissman, Jaffee details how his father, who enjoyed drawing, turned his four sons, especially his eldest two, Al (nee Abraham) and Harry, onto the funny pages. When Al’s mother uprooted the boys from their stable homelife in Savannah, Georgia to spend six impoverished, hungry years in Zarsai, Lithuania, Al lived for packages his father sent of newspaper clippings of the “funny pages.” While his father managed to get his then abused and neglected boys back to the States, Al’s mother moved them again to a Jewish ghetto in Lithuania. Their father father managed to get the boys out narrowly avoiding the Nazi takeover, although their mother didn’t make it to the train station on time to say goodbye. It was the last time, Jaffee saw his mother, who perished in the Holocaust. An artist through and through, cartooning became a refuge.

Al was so gifted that when he landed in the Bronx, his teacher recommended him to attend the first class of High School and Music & Art, which the then Mayor LaGuardia had just created. There Jaffee met his future partners-in-crime Will Eder, Harvey Kurtzman, John Severin, and Al Feldstein and gained classical drawing skills. Cartooning wasn’t part of the curriculum or even respected, although it didn’t stop Jaffee from doodling. Luckily, between the admiration he garnered from classmates, teachers, and an advertisement for Flit cigarettes drawn by Theodore Geisel, Jaffee decided to make a go of cartooning. As you will hear in our interview, Jaffee is first and foremost a mensch.

Aug 23 2017 · 34mins
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We Eat Al Jaffee

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Al Jaffee has quite literally been making cartoons longer than any artist in history. Unfortunately for everyone involved, he works at Mad Magazine.
May 15 2017 · 1hr 17mins

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Episode 200: Al Jaffee

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It was important to me that we have a special guest for episode 100. They Might Be Giants fitted the job perfectly, a band that played an incredibly important role in the early development of my musical tastes, as strange and idiosyncratic as they might ultimately become. With episode 200, the camera gets pulled make even further, to a man and a magazine that, for better or worse, let an indelible mark on my impressionable young mind, as they have for generations before and since. Weeks before I sat down to record this interview in Al Jaffee’s amazing Manhattan studio, upcoming guest Kid Congo Powers made reference to a club “looking like a scene out of Mad Magazine.” I knew what he meant immediately. The strange cross section of the human experience filtered through the lens of the Usual Gang of Idiots. And at their center is Jaffee. The cartoonist is now 95 (“closer to 96,” as he handily points out during the interview), with his signature fold-in having appeared in virtual every issue between 1964 and 2008, along with his other mainstays like "Snappy Answers to Stupid Questions.” The longest working cartoonist in history kindly agreed to sit down for wide ranging interview about life, death, cartooning and the importance of a steady gig. It’s one my absolute highlights of doing the show and great way to spend episode 200.

Jan 11 2017 · 1hr 27mins
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112. Dick DeBartolo and Al Jaffee

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Gilbert and Frank take a fond look back at seven-plus decades of Mad magazine with longtime contributors Dick DeBartolo and Al Jaffee, who discuss their friendships with legendary co-founder William M. Gaines, their shared admiration of Jack Davis and Mort Drucker and the secret origin of the term "potrzebie." Also, Al remembers Harvey Kurtzman and Al Feldstein, Dick falls for Lauren Bacall, Stephen Colbert pays tribute to a comedy hero and Gilbert bashes "Up the Academy." PLUS: Gloria Swanson! "To Tell the Truth"! "Snappy Answers to Stupid Questions"! Al parties with Jason Robards! And the genius of Don Martin!

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Jul 18 2016 · 1hr 33mins

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020: MAD's Al Jaffee

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Ruben Bolling and I had a terrific time interviewing one of our heroes, the amazing Al Jaffee, who has been a member of MAD magazine’s usual gang of idiots for 56 years (his work has appeared in every issue, save one).

Best known for his MAD Fold-in, which has appeared on the inside back cover of the magazine since 1964, he’s also the creator of a long running column, "Snappy Answers to Stupid Questions," and my favorite, his dozens and dozens of whimsical inventions that border on the edge of plausibility. Ruben went to Al Jaffee’s studio in New York to talk to him about his remarkable career. It's so great to discover that someone you grew up worshipping turns out to be incredibly nice!
Apr 07 2016 · 1hr
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AL JAFFEE, iconic cartoonist, discusses Stan Lee, Hugh Hefner, Mad Magazine, & PB & J sandwiches.

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As you enjoy your Thanksgiving vacation or are traveling back from it, you will be grateful to hear from fascinating, fun, and formidably talented illustrator and writer Al Jaffee.

We met at his studio, where his MAD mind is as creative as ever, even if he says he's not as insanely prolific at age 93. (Uh, he's doing more than most folks at any age.) Jaffee is working on his fantastically detailed and vibrant illustrations for Sponge Bob Square Pants to MAD Magazine to his long running cartoon for the Lubavitch. We spoke about religion as Al is not religious, but spent most of his childhood in bleak Jewish towns in Lithuania and narrowly escaped the Holocaust.

We also spoke about his career through the decades, which started when he entered LaGuardia High School. Jaffee shared his insight into how illustrators, writers, and cartoonists created a field that didn't exist. He reveals why Jews changed their names when hustling for gigs pre-World War II to what it was like to work with Stan Lee pre-Marvel....

Nov 29 2014 · 36mins
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Mad Magazine's AL JAFFEE on Employee of the Month

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This October marks Al Jaffee reign as Mad Magazine’s longest running contributor, clocking in 59 years and over 479 issues. Since 1952, the comic book turned magazine infused a childish silliness with biting political depth and orignal artwork. By engaging readers to add their own “Snappy Answers to Stupid Questions,” and even mangling the magazine to solve the “Fold-In” picture riddle, Mad was one of the first enterprises to treat consumers as co-conspirators. The result was an entirely new forum for humor in an era when few questioned whether father really knows best. It’s allure for children and teenagers simultaneously fueled outrage from the FBI to Congress the collective imaginations of future comedy writers and cartoonists. Writers behind The Simpsons, The Daily Show, The Onion, and The Colbert Report credit Mad Magazine for inspiring them.

The sheer joy Jaffee’s work provides fans offers to fans is inverse proportion to what he and his three brothers experienced growing up. In his biography Al...

Oct 07 2014 · 34mins
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MAD Magazine’s Al Jaffee & Other Jewish Comic Book Heroes

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In this months episode of Isabella FreeRadio, host, and Isabella Freedman Executive Director David Weisberg welcomes Danny Fingeroth, Arie Kaplan and Al Jaffee discuss the role of Jews in Comics, as well as the upcoming program at Isabella Freedman entitled “People Of The (Comic) Book” taking place August 10-12th.

Stay tuned for information about upcoming Isabella FreeRadio programs, as well as information about other programs at Isabella Freedman Jewish Retreat Center.

Aug 01 2012 ·