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Ken Ford

9 Podcast Episodes

Latest 1 May 2021 | Updated Daily

Weekly hand curated podcast episodes for learning

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Turning AI from a Tool to a Teammate with Ken Ford

Eye On A.I.

Ken Ford, an NSCAI commissioner, talks about turning AI from a tool to a teammate and unshackling research and implementation of AI from government bureaucracy in order to compete with nimbler countries such as China.

33mins

9 Sep 2020

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Research and Development with Dr. Ken Ford

National Security Commission on AI

Ken Ford, an NSCAI commissioner and founder/CEO of the Florida Institute For Human & Machine Cognition, talks about turning AI from a tool to a teammate, and unshackling AI research and implementation from government bureaucracy to compete with nimbler countries such as China.

33mins

9 Sep 2020

Similar People

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The King of Strings- Ken Ford on Transparency Talks Podcast

Transparency Talks Podcast

Transparency Talks Podcast hosted by Butta B-Rocka Pls join me as we talk to the King of Strings- Ken Ford Transparency Talks Podcast discusses the trails and triumphs of entrepreneurs and entertainers. For ad placements, sponsorships or to be a guest on the show contact info@buttabrocka.com Follow me on IG/FB/Twitter @ Buttabrocka www.buttabrocka.com #transparencypodcast #FBLive #stitcher #tunein #anchor #liverecording #guestspeaker#transparency #transparencytalks #transparencytalkspodcast #buttabrocka #inspiration #motivation #podcasters #podcast #entreprenuer #entrepreneurships #smallbusiness #applepodcast #googlepodcast #spotify #anchorfm #youtube #artist #author--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/transparencytalkspodcast/support

36mins

20 Apr 2020

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Trusting God Through Fire with Ken Ford

Diligent Pastors

“What was true of God before the fire is just as true now after the fire.” How does God refresh and nourish His people in the face of adversity?Support the show (https://diligentpastors.com/donate/)

42mins

7 Jun 2019

Most Popular

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Multiple FFPC Dynasty League Champ Ken Ford

The High Stakes Fantasy Football Hour

Hosts Eric Balkman and David A. Gerczak in this episode speak with a player that has won league titles in the Footballguys Players Championship, the Fantasy Football Players Championship (FFPC) Main Event and FFPC Dynasty leagues, Ken Ford. The three guys break down how Odell Beckham, Le'Veon Bell and Antonio Brown are moving ADP in 2019 FFPC Best Ball Drafts, as well as get into some high stakes dynasty strategy, and Dave and Balky total up the "I Got 5 On It" wagers for 2018. Plus the guys answer your calls, tweets, emails and more all on The High Stakes Fantasy Football Hour!

1hr 17mins

16 Mar 2019

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Optimal Diet and Movement for Healthspan, Amplified Intelligence and More with Ken Ford

Nourish Balance Thrive

Dr. Kenneth Ford is Founder and Chief Executive Officer of the Florida Institute for Human & Machine Cognition (IHMC), a research institute that is home to world-class scientists and engineers focused on building technology that extends human cognition, perception, locomotion and resilience. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Tulane University and is the author of hundreds of scientific papers and six books, with interests in an array of areas including artificial intelligence, cognitive science, and human performance under extreme conditions. Ken is also co-host to the popular and respected STEM-Talk podcast which recently won first place in the 12th Annual People’s Choice Podcast Awards in the Science and Medicine category. Many leaders in the areas of health and exercise physiology appear on STEM-talk, with a focus on the scientific elements behind extending human longevity and performance. Ken is here with us today to talk about some current projects at IHMC, artificial intelligence, ketosis, and his favorite cutting-edge training methods. Here’s the outline of this interview with Ken Ford: [00:04:16] Episode 49 of STEM-Talk, first place People's Choice Awards in the Science and Medicine category. [00:06:43] Current projects. [00:07:10] Dr. James Allen, World Modelers. [00:08:54] Economic modeling, weather modeling for crop failure. [00:09:45] Cognitive orthotics. [00:10:36] Dr. Dawn Kernagis, brain glymphatic system. Podcast: Human Performance and Resilience in Extreme Environments. [00:11:52] Artificial gravity. [00:12:34] The double secret selection committee. [00:13:56] Extending human capabilities. [00:16:35] Locomotion for paraplegics. [00:17:31] Humans in extreme environments. [00:19:51] Space flight and aging. [00:20:41] Few rules but strong culture and a flat organisational structure. [00:22:07] Growth mindset. [00:22:41] Choosing people rather than an agenda. [00:28:09] Fostering a network of friends and experts. [00:28:46] Barry Barish, STEM-talk Episode 10. [00:31:37] Understanding the limits of knowledge. [00:32:47] Do the big tech companies have too much power? [00:35:51] EU 2.5$ penalty for Google. [00:36:45] Google D.C. influence operation. [00:38:36] Duckduckgo. [00:39:10] The term artificial intelligence. [00:42:41] The danger of a superhuman AI. [00:44:21] HAL 9000. [00:45:09] Dropped a physics. [00:45:58] Driverless cars. [00:51:52] Ketogenic diet. [00:53:23] The benefits of ketones. [00:53:55] Signalling functions of beta hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and acetoacetate. [00:54:26] Study: Shimazu, Tadahiro, et al. "Suppression of oxidative stress by β-hydroxybutyrate, an endogenous histone deacetylase inhibitor." Science 339.6116 (2013): 211-214. [00:55:11] Study: Newman, John C., et al. "Ketogenic diet reduces midlife mortality and improves memory in aging mice." Cell metabolism 26.3 (2017): 547-557. [00:55:57] Study: Sleiman, Sama F., et al. "Exercise promotes the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through the action of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate." Elife 5 (2016). [00:57:03] Study: Roberts, Megan N., et al. "A ketogenic diet extends longevity and healthspan in adult mice." Cell metabolism 26.3 (2017): 539-546. [00:58:03] Podcast: Why Your Diet Isn’t Working: Undereating and Overtraining, with Megan Roberts. [00:58:24] Podcast: The Keto Masterclass with Robb Wolf. [00:59:38] Virta Health, results with 0.5 - 1 mmol/L of BHB. [01:00:11] Study: Shimazu, Tadahiro, et al. "Suppression of oxidative stress by β-hydroxybutyrate, an endogenous histone deacetylase inhibitor." Science 339.6116 (2013): 211-214. [01:01:01] Study: Cunnane, Stephen C., et al. "Can ketones compensate for deteriorating brain glucose uptake during aging? Implications for the risk and treatment of Alzheimer's disease." Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1367.1 (2016): 12-20. [01:02:53] Exogenous ketones. [01:05:26] Exercise. [01:06:33] Hierarchical sets. [01:07:11] Art DeVany. [01:08:17] Episode 30 of STEM-Talk. [01:10:15] Eccentric movements. [01:10:41] Study: Schoenfeld, Brad J., et al. "Hypertrophic effects of concentric vs. eccentric muscle actions: a systematic review and meta-analysis." The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research 31.9 (2017): 2599-2608. [01:13:37] Blood flow restriction training. [01:14:41] Episode 34 of STEM-Talk. [01:16:31] Dr. Jim Stray-Gundersen, Dr. Adam Anz. [01:18:13] Kaatsu and Go B Strong (discount code: IHMC). [01:18:43] Vibration platform training. [01:19:16] Power Plate. [01:21:12] Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS). [01:22:56] PowerDot. [01:26:41] Kettlebells. [01:27:04] Pavel Tsatsouline. [01:28:21] Strong First, Coaches Mark Reifkind and Tracy Reifkind. [01:29:15] Why not cardio? [01:30:36] Zoo humans. Book: The Human Zoo: A Zoologist’s Classic Study of the Urban Animal, by Desmond Morris [01:32:12] Study: Fain, Elizabeth, and Cara Weatherford. "Comparative study of millennials' (age 20-34 years) grip and lateral pinch with the norms." Journal of Hand Therapy 29.4 (2016): 483-488. [01:34:56] Don't be normal. [01:38:07] Finding versus inventing a purpose. [01:41:45] Cal Newport. [01:43:19] IHMC.us newsletter.

1hr 44mins

23 Feb 2018

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The King of Strings with Ken Ford

Cool Soror with Rashan Ali

It’s another Cool People episode of The Cool Soror Podcast with the amazing violinist Ken Ford. A native of Atlanta, Georgia Ken had the innate ability to understand music by ear before he was classically trained. He got his first violin at nine-years-old and the rest is melodious history. Electric. A word that describes not only Ken Ford’s violin but aptly describes the man himself. His electrifying and deeply physical live performances have audiences up on their feet and into the aisles, feeling the music as much as he does. Far from being any quiet instrument, Ken’s infectious energy takes the violin center stage with amazing artistry and creativity, rocking out on the violin with passion and fervor. A wonder to behold on stage, Ken’s evocative playing and passion for strings on the electric violin have enthralled fans of all ages, as well as peers from diverse genres, from jazz to blues, R&B to hip-hop and more. With a soul-stirring style that highlights all the voices of the violin, from sensuous and genteel to dramatic and muscular, Ken’s talents have brought him on stage and into the recording studio with a range of superstar artists including Bruno Mars, Jill Scott, Wyclef Jean, Chaka Khan, Ledisi, Brian Culbertson, the late Barry White, Erykah Badu and more. Additionally, Ken had the pleasure and honor to play for our beloved First Lady of the United States of America, Michelle Obama! Early in his career, Ken followed his passion for violin but lived a dual life, working as an IT programmer while honing and indulging his love of music at night. He established himself on the scene with local artists and newcomers, attracting more and more fans and attention from national and international promoters and peers. From the bottom up, he has built his kingdom. It’s only right that he holds the crown of “The King of Strings.” Social Media:www.kenford.netIG @kenfordkingofstrings FB kenfordkingofstrings

31mins

16 Nov 2017

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Episode 50: Ken Ford talks about ketosis, optimizing exercise, and the future direction of science, technology, and culture

STEM-Talk

Today’s episode features the second of Dawn Kernagis’ two-part interview with her STEM-Talk co-host and IHMC Director Ken Ford. This episode marks a milestone for STEM-Talk. It’s our 50th episode and follows Ken’s formal induction into the Florida Inventor’s Hall of Fame. In part one of Dawn’s interview, listeners learned about Ken’s childhood and his years as a rock and roll promoter back in the ‘70s. Ken even shared an interesting story about how he went from being a philosophy major to a computer scientist. He also talked about his work in AI and the creation of IHMC and the pioneering work underway at the institute. If you missed episode 49, be sure to check it out. Part two of Ken’s interview focuses more on his research and personal experience with the ketogenic diet, ketone esters, exercise and ways to extend health span and perhaps longevity. Dawn and Ken also discuss the nature of technical progress As listeners learned in part one, Ken has a varied background. He is a co-founder of IHMC, which has grown into one of the nation’s premier research organizations with world-class scientists and engineers investigating a broad range of topics. He also is the author of hundreds of scientific papers and six books. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Tulane University. He is a Fellow of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, a charter Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, and a member of the Association for Computing Machinery, the IEEE Computer Society, and the National Association of Scholars. In 2012, Tulane University named Ford its Outstanding Alumnus in the School of Science and Engineering. The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence named Dr. Ford the recipient of the 2015 Distinguished Service Award. Also in 2015, Dr. Ford was elected as Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In January 1997, Dr. Ford was asked by NASA to develop and direct its new Center of Excellence in Information Technology at the Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, where he also served as Associate Center Director. In July 1999, Dr. Ford was awarded the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal. That same year, Ford returned to private life in Florida and to IHMC. In October 2002, President George W. Bush nominated Dr. Ford to serve on the National Science Board (NSB). In 2005, Dr. Ford was appointed and sworn in as a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. In 2007, he became a member of the NASA Advisory Council and on October 16, 2008, Dr. Ford was named as chairman – a capacity in which he served until October 201l. In August 2010, Dr. Ford was awarded NASA’s Distinguished Public Service Medal – the highest honor the agency confers. In February 2012, Dr. Ford was named to a two-year term on the Defense Science Board and in 2013, he became a member of the Advanced Technology Board which supports the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. Links: IHMC website: http://www.ihmc.us Ken Ford web page: http://www.ihmc.us/groups/kford/ Florida Inventors Hall of Fame website: http://www.floridainvents.org Outside magazine story on Ken Ford and ketogenic diet: https://www.outsideonline.com/2113406/high-carb-low-fat-ketone-diet Blood Flow Restriction Device. 15% discount code: IHMC https://www.gobstrong.com/what-is-b-strong/ BhB Ketone Ester https://hvmn.com Powerdot Muscle Stimulator https://www.powerdot.com/products/powerdot-muscle-stimulator Papers: Suppression of Oxidative Stress by b-Hydroxybutyrate, an Endogenous Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor http://www.ihmc.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Verdin_2013.pdf Ketone Bodies as Signaling Metabolites http://www.ihmc.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/TEM-Ketone-bodies-as-signaling-metabolites-2014.pdf Ketogenic Diet Reduces Midlife Mortality and Improves Memory in Aging Mice http://www.ihmc.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Verdin-Ketogenic-Mouse-Longevity-Cell-Metab-9-17-1.pdf A Ketogenic Diet Extends Longevity and Healthspan in Adult Mice http://www.ihmc.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Ramsey-Mouse-Longevity-Cell-Metab-9-17.pdf Ketone Bodies Mimic the Life Span Extending Properties of Caloric Restriction http://www.ihmc.us/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Ketone-bodies-mimic-lifespan-extending-properties-of-CR_Veech_Review_2017.pdf Show notes: 7:06: Dawn begins part two of her interview with Ken by pointing out that some of the work IHMC is doing in terms of human performance is focused on nutritional approaches, including ketogenic diets and ketone esters. Dawn mentions that Ken was an early adopter of the ketogenic diet and that some people even refer to him as “the keto guy.” She then asks him when he first embraced a ketogenic diet and what attracted him to it. 8:06:  Ken Talks about his long experience with the ketogenic diet and its effect on body composition. 10:30: Ken discusses how he became interested in ketone esters. 12:34: Dawn asks about research that seems to show that elevated levels of circulating ketone bodies have the potential to protect people from some of the diseases of aging. 12:47:  Ken discusses healthspan, lifespan, and bending the aging curve. 14:04:  Ken notes that, in his view, it should not be surprising that shifting something as fundamental as the fuel substrate for our metabolism would have widespread effects. 14:19:  Ken talks about the epidemic of insulin resistance, diabetes, and obesity. 15:20:  Dawn asks Ken to discuss the relatively newly discovered effects of ketone bodies which go well beyond their well-appreciated metabolic roles … and that might have various anti-aging effects. 16:59:  Ken asserts that many of the most exciting effects of ketones are not only those arising from their role as an energy source but also that they play critically important signaling functions.  Ken talks about the research showing that the ketone bodies are HDAC inhibitors and seem to link environmental cues, such as diet, to the regulation of aging. 17:23:  Ken explains how HDACs inhibit BDNF and as mentioned above, ketones inhibit HDACs … thereby increasing BDNF. 18:20: Ken discusses two new papers showing a substantial extension of healthspan and lifespan in adult mice. 20:57: Dawn asks about the effect of the ketogenic diet on the maintenance of muscle and strength as people age. 24:48:  Dawn asks Ken about the ketogenic diet and IGF-1. 26:45:  Dawn notes that stem cells become less effective with age and asks about the implications of this phenomenon for maintenance of muscle. 27:37: Ken explains what the ketogenic diet is. 29:48: Dawn points out the Google search term “ketogenic diet” now outnumbers searches for Paleo diets. She asks Ken if he thought this would be the case back in 2006 when he first returned to a ketogenic diet. 31:18: Dawn asks Ken about what he sees as the primary benefit of blood-flow restriction training and how he uses it in his training. 34:25: Dawn asks Ken about what other exercise methods he employs in his training to optimize muscle mass and minimize potential injury. 34:38:  Ken mentions electrical muscle stimulation (PowerDot), kettlebells, resistance training, Tabata sessions, and hiking in Wyoming and Maine. 35:37:  Ken discusses hierarchical sets as employed in resistance training. 36:27:  Dawn ask Ken if he “goes to failure” when engaged in resistance training. 37:13:  Dawn asks Ken if has any thoughts on eccentric movements when engaged in resistance training. 38:50:  Dawn asks Ken about NASA funded research at IHMC, led by Peter Neuhaus, aimed at developing technology to enable exercise devices for use on long-duration deep space missions. 39:41: Dawn mentions that when she first met Ken that she was doing research on apolipoprotein E in a neurocritical care laboratory. She asks Ken for his take on APOE in athletics and other approaches when it comes to harnessing people’s genetic information for optimized health. 42:03: Dawn asks Ken to describe a typical day and a typical week in the life of Ken Ford, including what his diet looks like and what he typically eats for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 44:03: Dawn wonders how many expressos, which Ken refers to as the elixir of the mind, he drinks in a day. 45:06: Dawn asks Ken about his time at NASA’s Ames Research Center. 46:06:  She asks Ken to talk about his experience on the National Science Board and whether there were any stories he could share. 48:48:  Dawn asks Ken to discuss his service on the NASA Advisory Council. 50:04: Dawn mentions that Ken has been a member of the National Science Board, NASA Advisory Council, Air Force Science Advisory Board, the Advanced Technology Board for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, and the Defense Science Board. She asks Ken for his takeaways from serving on those boards and councils. 52:10:  Dawn notes that during Apollo, NASA annually accounted for roughly 4% of Federal spending and asks Ken if he knows the percentage currently? 52:55:  Ken laments that public service is becoming increasingly unpleasant … and that the best people invariably leave as a result. 54:05: Dawn asks Ken to talk about the accelerating rate of technological progress and its effects on society and the individual. 54:25:  Ken distinguishes between “technological change” and “progress.” 57:11:  Dawn asks, if taken from a purely technological perspective, are we not advancing faster than ever before? 1:00:54: Dawn plays an audio clip of Ken talking about the zombie apocalypse, which she describes as one of her favorite stories, and asks him to expand upon on it. 1:04:20: Dawn thanks Ken for sitting down for an interview.

1hr 6mins

7 Nov 2017

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Episode 49: Ken Ford talks about AI, its critics, and research at IHMC

STEM-Talk

On the eve of Ken Ford’s induction into the Florida Inventor’s Hall of Fame, co-host Dawn Kernagis convinced IHMC’s director and CEO that it was the perfect time to have the chairman of STEM-Talk’s double secret selection committee take a turn as a guest on the podcast. Today’s show features part one of Dawn’s two-part interview with her STEM-Talk co-host Ken Ford. Listeners will learn about Ken’s childhood and background; his early work in computer science and research into AI; as well as the creation of IHMC, which, as our regular listeners know, is a “not-for-profit research lab pioneering groundbreaking technologies aimed at leveraging and extending human cognition, perception, locomotion and resilience.” In this episode, Ken will share some of the pioneering work underway at IHMC. Dawn also asks Ken about highly vocal critics of AI such as Elon Musk. Episode 50, the second part of Dawn’s interview with Ken, will transition to a conversation about Ken and IHMC’s research into human performance. Their conversation will cover exercise, the ketogenic diet and ketone esters with the goal of extending health span and perhaps longevity. In terms of background, Dr. Ken Ford is a co-founder of IHMC, which has grown into one of the nation’s premier research organizations with world-class scientists and engineers investigating a broad range of topics. Ken is the author of hundreds of scientific papers and six books. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Tulane University. He is a Fellow of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, a charter Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, and a member of the Association for Computing Machinery, the IEEE Computer Society, and the National Association of Scholars. In 2012, Tulane University named Ford its Outstanding Alumnus in the School of Science and Engineering. The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence named Dr. Ford the recipient of the 2015 Distinguished Service Award. Also in 2015, Dr. Ford was elected as  a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In January 1997, Dr. Ford was asked by NASA to develop and direct its new Center of Excellence in Information Technology at the Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, where he also served as Associate Center Director. In July 1999, Dr. Ford was awarded the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal. That same year, Ford returned to private life in Florida and to IHMC. In October 2002, President George W. Bush nominated Dr. Ford to serve on the National Science Board (NSB). In 2005, Dr. Ford was appointed and sworn in as a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. In 2007, he became a member of the NASA Advisory Council and on October 16, 2008, Dr. Ford was named as chairman – a capacity in which he served until October 201l. In August 2010, Dr. Ford was awarded NASA’s Distinguished Public Service Medal – the highest honor the agency confers. In February 2012, Dr. Ford was named to a two-year term on the Defense Science Board and in 2013, he became a member of the Advanced Technology Board which supports the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. Links: IHMC website: http://www.ihmc.us Ken Ford web page: http://www.ihmc.us/groups/kford/ Florida Inventors Hall of Fame website: http://www.floridainvents.org Outside magazine story on Ken Ford and ketogenic diet: https://www.outsideonline.com/2113406/high-carb-low-fat-ketone-diet Cognitive Orthoses PDF Bulletin Atomic Scientists 2014 Show notes: 6:41: Dawn welcomes Ken to the show. 7:04: Dawn asks Ken to talk about his childhood 8:12: Dawn points out that Ken moved around a lot because his father was in the Navy and asks him what that was like. 8:20: Dawn mentions that Ken lived in Guantanamo, also known as GITMO. She asks him what it was like to live there as a young child. 8:56: Dawn talks about how when Ken started high school, he became passionate about wrestling and began shaving off weight by cutting back on carbs. She asks Ken what drew him to wrestling in the first place. 9:48: Dawn asks Ken to discuss the mental aspect of wrestling. 10:33: Dawn asks Ken if he was always interested in science. 11:15: Dawn asks Ken if he had any influential teachers in high school. 13:56: Dawn discusses how before Ken became a scientist, he was a rock and roll promoter. She then asks Ken how this happened. 16:06: Dawn asks Ken if it was during this time that he met Jeff “Skunk” Baxter, previously interviewed on STEM-Talk. 16:37: Dawn shares a funny story about how her sister used to work with Richard “Paco” Zimmer, one of the best in the business. 17:25: Dawn discusses how Ken enlisted in the Navy after promoting rock and roll. She goes on to say how this is what led to Ken becoming interested in computer science, even though he thought computers were about the most “unfun thing that the Navy could assign him to do.” She then asks Ken to talk about how the Navy pushed him into computer science. 21:38: Dawn discusses how Ken did his Masters in System Science, while in the Navy, at the University of West Florida. He then went to Tulane for his doctorate. Dawn asks Ken how an ex-athlete and philosophy major decides to get a doctorate in computer science, and whether or not people thought he was crazy. 22:46: Dawn says that after Tulane, Ken returned to the University of West Florida in 1988 and became the assistant professor in computer science, and then rather quickly became a full professor. She then asks Ken what research in AI looked like at the time. 23:57: Dawn asks Ken what the focus of his AI research was back then. 28:55: STEM-Talk Blurb 29:21: Dawn discusses how Ken is not a fan of the term artificial intelligence, and that he says that amplified intelligence is a better way to refer to AI. She then asks Ken to talk about this. 30:54: Dawn says that Ken and his colleague, Pat Hayes, have said that the Turing test has misdirected the ambitions of people working in AI and has confused the public, particularly the media. She then asks Ken to describe the Turing test and talk about why it has become problematic. 33:38: Dawn discusses how AI techniques like machine learning are now used for many other applications. She then asks Ken if he could have ever imagined this kind of future when he began working with AI in the 1980s. 35:54: Dawn references a story from the New York Times that discusses a meeting Elon Musk had with governors, where he said that they should adopt AI legislation before “robots start going down the street and killing people.” He also tweeted that AI going rogue was more of a risk than North Korea. Dawn asks Ken his opinion on this. 39:21: Dawn reads Ken a quote from the co-founder of the Center for Complex Systems Research at the University of Illinois. She then asks Ken what he thinks about the comment. 41:50: Dawn then discusses a story from David Fries about the brilliancy of the name Institute for Human and Machine Cognition. Dawn asks Ken if he intentionally placed the word human before machine in the institute’s name. 42:42: Dawn comments on how impressed she is by the range of research done at IHMC. She asks Ken to give listeners an overview of the work. 43:44: Dawn shares an audio clip about self-reinvention from a video produced for Ken’s induction into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame. 44:22: Dawn asks Ken to talk about how he has constantly reinvented himself. 45:13: Dawn discusses how Ken has created a supportive framework at IHMC that is flexible enough so that the researchers and scientists there can also reinvent themselves. She then asks Ken how he came up with this concept. 48:04: Dawn comments how one of the things that makes it possible is the flat structure of IHMC and asks Ken to elaborate on this. 49:18: Dawn discusses how IHMC has begun doing research on human performance in extreme environments. She then asks Ken what brought about the interest in human performance in extreme environments, and that evolved into an arm of IHMC.

24 Oct 2017