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Michael Lista Podcasts

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7 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Michael Lista. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Michael Lista, often where they are interviewed.

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7 of The Best Podcast Episodes for Michael Lista. A collection of podcasts episodes with or about Michael Lista, often where they are interviewed.

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THIS TRULY IS... The State of Truth, News & Media - Ft. Michael Lista S2 E7

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What is happening with truth and journalism? We are living in the era of "Fake News", and Social Media Platforms are littered with dis-information that shapes and re-shapes public perception. Nowadays, everyone with a smartphone is a reporter that can share their stories in real time - but who is fact checking news? Where does truth lie? Today, we discuss the state of truth, news and media with Michael Lista.
Jun 17 2020 · 34mins
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Michael Lista, Toronto Life Magazine

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Writer Michael Lista on the cold case murder of a woman in Canada in 1974, and how cops devised an elaborate undercover operation to try and nab a killer decades later.
Feb 12 2020 · 45mins
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Michael Lista on Canadian Poetry, the Saudi Arms Deal, MacBeth and Men Crying

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Michael Lista is an investigative journalist, essayist and poet in Toronto. He has worked as a book columnist for The National Post, and as the poetry editor of The Walrus. He is the author of three books: the poetry volumes Bloom and The Scarborough, and Strike Anywherea collection of his writing about literature, television and culture. His essays and investigative stories have appeared in The AtlanticSlateToronto LifeThe WalrusThe New Yorker, and elsewhere. He was the 2017 Margaret Laurence Fellow at Trent University and a finalist for the Allan Slaight Prize for Journalism.

I met Michael at his home in Toronto to talk about his essays in Strike Anywhere (Porcupine's Quill, 2016) Canadian Poetry, Rupi Kaur, Al Purdy and Wordsworth, common speech and common sense, Carmine Starnino and The Lover's Quarrel, John Metcalf, Leonard Cohen and schmaltz, John Thompson, Dante, Scott Griffin, the Saudi arms deal, Margaret Atwood, MacBeth, long-form investigative journalism, crime reporting, self-interest, radical truth-telling and men crying. 

Nov 05 2018 · 1hr 32mins
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Margaret Laurence Lecture: Michael Lista "Outside the Whale: Literature and the Left in the Age of Trump"

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With two well-received collections of poems and a fearless collection of essays, Canadian investigative journalist, essayist and poet, Michael Lista, was welcomed to Trent University as the 2017 Margaret Laurence fellow.

His talk Outside the Whale: Literature and the Left in the Age of Trump focused primarily on the role the literary left will play in a new political climate of right-winged politics and nationalism.

Mr. Lista has worked as a book columnist for The National Post, and as the poetry editor of The Walrus. He is the author of three books: the poetry volumes Bloom and The Scarborough, and Strike Anywhere, a collection of his writing about literature, television and culture. His essays and investigative stories have appeared in The Atlantic, Slate, Toronto Life, The Walrus, Canadaland, and elsewhere.

From the School of the Study of Canada:

He’s been a book columnist and noted poet and during his visit at Trent University, Michael Lista was ready to defend his craft – and the literary left – particularly at a time when the political elite seems on the verge of stepping into the ring at the slightest comment.

On February 9, 2017, speaking to a crowd at Traill College’s Bagnani Hall, he shared his own experiences in writing both ahead of, and following the U.S. election.

Throughout his address, Mr. Lista painted a picture of struggles facing literary writers who have, by and large, been described as left leaning. Now, he suggests, they are under fire much in the way they held the right to the fire for so long. He says, “It has resulted in a new, drawn-out battle, pitting literary writers against one another. It’s taken the focus, to some extent, off those who would normally be the target of the writers.”

This year, Mr. Lista has been named writer-in-residence, filling a fellowship established in 1988 as a tribute to and in memory of Margaret Laurence, Trent University’s fourth chancellor. It is co-administered by Department of English Literature and Canadian Studies Program and brings promising writers who are in the early stages of their careers to Trent University.

Mr. Lista has worked as a book columnist for the National Post, and as the poetry editor of The Walrus. He is also the author of three books and his essays and investigative stories have appeared in The Atlantic, Slate, Toronto Life, Canadaland, and numerous other publications.

Kate Taylor, an English major at Trent, says she was compelled to take in the address after Mr. Lista spoke to her advanced creative writing class earlier in the day. “It’s very interesting to hear a writer read their own work and describe the process and annotations they give to their own work that you don’t get when you read it on a website,” she says.  

Mar 14 2017 · 30mins
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Episode 3: Poet Michael Lista

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Michael Lista is a poet, columnist for the National Post, and the poetry editor at The Walrus. The Montreal Gazette called Michael a "brilliant, erudite new voice on the Canadian poetry scene," and Barry called him, "a great host who got me drunk during our podcast interview." Michael's book The Scarbourough, due out in September, is a collection of poems that takes place during the weekend Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka abducted Kristin French. Michael spoke with us about the agony and ecstasy of the 'burbs, Biggie vs. Tupac, and being called a literary rapist. He also talks about aesthetic theory and what he'd say to the "Ken and Barbie Killers" if given the chance.
Jun 30 2014 · 1hr 30mins
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Michael Lista on Ethics and Honesty in Poetry Reviews

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I met with Canadian poet/critic Michael Lista several months ago to discuss the state of poetry reviewing in Canada, the need for honesty in criticism, and his take on poet/philosopher Jan Zwicky's essay “The Ethics of the Negative Review,” in which she defends her practice, while review editor in the 1990s of The Fiddlehead literary journal, of not publishing negative reviews.

Buckle up and enjoy the ride.

Jan 27 2013 · 26mins
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Michael Lista on his first collection of poems, Bloom

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I first heard about Michael Lista in a workshop conducted by Meeka Walsh, Editor of Border Crossings magazine. She raved about him: "Michael is a remarkably gifted young poet who lives in Montreal. He has a special interest in the points of intersection between science and poetics."

These points live dramatically in the person of Louis Slotin, a scientist from Winnipeg involved in the Manhattan project and development of the atomic bomb, and Lista’s desire to capture a day in his life. On May 21, 1946, Slotin conducted a dangerous experiment referred to by his fellow scientists as "tickling the dragon’s tail." Using a framework of existing poems, in the way that James Joyce used Homer’s Odyssey, Lista has borderline plagiarized them in a collection which documents this May day. The book will be entitled Bloom. Anansi will publish it.

"Out of admiration for the virtuosity of Slotin’s achievements - with the attendant hubris and arrogance necessary to take risks and make anything new - and taking on those qualities in his own work, Lista’s poems do glitter, but more lastingly than that word would suggest. Dazzle too has a showiness I don’t mean to imply but the wit is so apparent. At the same time the tone is held and is exactly what the subject requires in this poetic construction."

Revisiting my Salon des Refuses experience, I am reminded of how rarely one encounters great literary work, in poetry especially. Pablo Neruda, Ted Hughes, Robin Robertson…I knew immediately upon first reading their poems that something extraordinary was happening. Their words rubbed up against my experience and sensibilities in ways that satisfied like few others.

I felt something of this while reading the handful of poems Michael sent me in advance of our conversation. We talk here about the suicidal dangers of emulating Joyce’s Ulysses, and the book’s un-approachability; punning, the multiple meanings of 'bloom'; epiphanies, coincidences, translation, sex and physics, life and death.

Nov 04 2008 · 39mins