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Kate Imy

12 Podcast Episodes

Latest 28 Jan 2023 | Updated Daily

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Ep 29: Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army Guftagu with Dr Kate Imy

India Colonised

Hello and Welcome everyone to India Colonised A Podcast dedicated to Sout Asia’s Colonial history. I am your host Omer Haq and today on our next episode of guftagu we have with us Dr Kate Imy. Kate Imy is a historian of culture and war in British colonial Asia. Her first book,  Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army, examines culture and anti-colonialism in the 20th century British Indian army. It won the NACBS Stansky prize and the Pacific Coast Branch Book Award of the American Historical Association. Her next project considers soldier and civilian experiences of war in Singapore and Malaya. She is a recipient of a Fulbright fellowship, two CLS awards (Hindi and Urdu), a fellowship from the Institute of Historical Research (London), and a Bernadotte E. Schmitt grant from the American Historical Association. In 2021 she is the Lee Kong Chian NUS-Stanford Fellow on Southeast Asia. During the first four decades of the twentieth century, the British Indian Army possessed an illusion of racial and religious inclusivity. The army recruited diverse soldiers, known as the "Martial Races," including British Christians, Hindustani Muslims, Punjabi Sikhs, Hindu Rajputs, Pathans from northwestern India, and "Gurkhas" from Nepal. As anti-colonial activism intensified, military officials incorporated some soldiers' religious traditions into the army to keep them disciplined and loyal. They facilitated acts such as the fast of Ramadan for Muslim soldiers and allowed religious swords among Sikhs to recruit men from communities where anti-colonial sentiment grew stronger. Consequently, Indian nationalists and anti-colonial activists charged the army with fomenting racial and religious divisions. In Faithful Fighters, Kate Imy explores how military culture created unintended dialogues between soldiers and civilians, including Hindu nationalists, Sikh revivalists, and pan-Islamic activists. By the 1920s and '30s, the army constructed military schools and academies to isolate soldiers from anti-colonial activism. While this carefully managed military segregation crumbled under the pressure of the Second World War, Imy argues that the army militarized racial and religious difference, creating lasting legacies for the violent partition and independence of India, and the endemic warfare and violence of the post-colonial world. Here is my conversation with Dr Kate Imy about her book Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army. Listen to our conversation on her intellectual journey and the journey of writing this book, including how we can engage with his work in relevance to today's world. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter handle: @Indiacolonised or visit us on www.indiacolonised.com. Don’t forget to visit our website for book recommendations and a complete reading list if you want to read more on India’s Modern History!

1hr 33mins

22 Aug 2021

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Kate Imy - Faithful Fighters

Lekh

In the seventeenth episode, I speak to Kate Imy, a historian at the University of North Texas, about her recent book Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army, published by Stanford University Press in 2019. The book explores how the military culture, created by the British, spawned new dialogues and dynamics between soldiers and civilian communities, including Sikhs, Hindus, and Muslims. Colonial authorities had to respect and incorporate certain social and religious traditions into the Army to keep these groups loyal while ensuring these concessions did not fuel anti-colonial sentiments. The conversation begins by setting the context around the martial races, or the discourse through which the colonial state recruited soldiers before moving to understand how colonial authorities engaged with three major ethno-religious communities (Sikhs, Muslims, and Nepal Gurkhas). Imy then explains this dynamic through the Sikh Kirpan, a symbol of Sikh's martial prowess but could also be used to spur anti-colonial resistance. Next, we talk about the relationship between body and faith and the body's importance to the faith colonial officials had on Indian soldiers. The conversation moves to consider the effects of 'Indianization,' bringing more Indians into the Army through military academies, and the implications of recent efforts to further 'Indianize' the Indian Army effacing colonial traditions. The conversation ends by asking how we can deal with the fraught legacy left by the British Indian army in the subcontinent today. Links Faithful Fighters 

1hr 2mins

17 Jun 2021

Similar People

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Faithful Fighters with Professor Kate Imy

SikhArchive

Hi, I’m Sukhraj Singh from Sikh Archive and welcome to the thirteenth episode of our Podcast series of conversations with historians, authors, academics, journalists and activists on topics related to their areas of expertise on Sikh or Panjabi history.In this episode we are joined by Professor Kate Imy from the University of North Texas, where she is a historian of war and empire teaching classes on questions of identity (race, gender, class, religion) in the twentieth-century British imperial world. Today we will be discussing her book, “Faithful Fighters” which explores the racial and religious inclusivity of Indians in the British Empire against the backdrop of anti-colonial activism.We explore the infamous construction of the martial race and how a military culture created unintended dialogues between soldiers and civilians and how this contributed to creating lasting legacies for the violent partition and independence of India, and the endemic warfare and violence of the post-colonial world.★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

56mins

11 Jan 2021

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TGW031 - Kate Imy about The British Indian Army

Real Time History Podcast

Kate Imy is Assistant Professor of History at the University of North Texas. In her new book "Faithful Fighters - Identity and Power in the British Indian Army" she takes a look at one of the biggest colonial forces in the first half of the 20th century that it often overlooked.    Order Faithful Fighters: https://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=31378 Follow Kate Imy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/kateimy2See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

34mins

15 Nov 2020

Most Popular

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Ep162 – Combat, identity and power in the Indian Army during WW1 – Prof. Kate Imy

Mentioned in Dispatches

Kate Imy, Assistant Professor of History at the University of North Texas, talks about her recent book Faithful Fighters. Her book explores the Indian Army’s attempts to racialize and militarize the South Asian identities of its multi-racial, multi-linguistic, and multi-faith soldiery to secure their loyalty, cooperation. Her book is published by Standford University Press.

25 May 2020

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Kate Imy, "Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army" (Stanford UP, 2019)

New Books in South Asian Studies

In her fascinating and remarkable new book Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army (Stanford University Press, 2019), Kate Imy explores the negotiation of religious identity, military service, and imperial power in the context of twentieth century British India. How were preconceived British imperial notions of religion and loyalty to the state attached to indigenous South Asian communities frustrated by the way Sikh, Muslim, Hindu, and Nepali Gurkha (Hindu and Buddhist) soldiers engaged the state and performed their political and religious identities as part of the British Indian army.Faithful Fighters is a powerful and brilliant meditation on the impossibility of modern colonial power to canonize religion and religious identity. The six chapters of this book examine a range of archives, themes, theaters, and actors including tensions surrounding the valorization of Sikh loyalty and controversies shadowing the Kirpān (sword), the cooptation of pan-Islamic sentiments for British imperialism, suspicions and sexual desires invested in the figure of the Pathan, Nepali Gurkhas, caste hierarchies, and rituals of purification, debates of food and religion in the military, projects of nationalism through military academies, and masculinity, fascism, and Hindu nationalism.This thoroughly researched and multidisciplinary book will attract and interest scholars from a range of fields including South Asian history, Religious Studies, Islamic Studies, Military History, and Cultural Studies. Beautifully written, and populated with enticing narratives and images, it will also be a delight to teach in a variety of classes.SherAli Tareen is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Franklin and Marshall College. His research focuses on Muslim intellectual traditions and debates in early modern and modern South Asia. His academic publications are available here. He can be reached at sherali.tareen@fandm.edu. Listener feedback is most welcome. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/south-asian-studies

1hr 10mins

3 Apr 2020

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Kate Imy, "Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army" (Stanford UP, 2019)

New Books in History

In her fascinating and remarkable new book Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army (Stanford University Press, 2019), Kate Imy explores the negotiation of religious identity, military service, and imperial power in the context of twentieth century British India. How were preconceived British imperial notions of religion and loyalty to the state attached to indigenous South Asian communities frustrated by the way Sikh, Muslim, Hindu, and Nepali Gurkha (Hindu and Buddhist) soldiers engaged the state and performed their political and religious identities as part of the British Indian army.Faithful Fighters is a powerful and brilliant meditation on the impossibility of modern colonial power to canonize religion and religious identity. The six chapters of this book examine a range of archives, themes, theaters, and actors including tensions surrounding the valorization of Sikh loyalty and controversies shadowing the Kirpān (sword), the cooptation of pan-Islamic sentiments for British imperialism, suspicions and sexual desires invested in the figure of the Pathan, Nepali Gurkhas, caste hierarchies, and rituals of purification, debates of food and religion in the military, projects of nationalism through military academies, and masculinity, fascism, and Hindu nationalism.This thoroughly researched and multidisciplinary book will attract and interest scholars from a range of fields including South Asian history, Religious Studies, Islamic Studies, Military History, and Cultural Studies. Beautifully written, and populated with enticing narratives and images, it will also be a delight to teach in a variety of classes.SherAli Tareen is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Franklin and Marshall College. His research focuses on Muslim intellectual traditions and debates in early modern and modern South Asia. His academic publications are available here. He can be reached at sherali.tareen@fandm.edu. Listener feedback is most welcome. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

1hr 10mins

3 Apr 2020

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Kate Imy, "Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army" (Stanford UP, 2019)

New Books in Islamic Studies

In her fascinating and remarkable new book Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army (Stanford University Press, 2019), Kate Imy explores the negotiation of religious identity, military service, and imperial power in the context of twentieth century British India. How were preconceived British imperial notions of religion and loyalty to the state attached to indigenous South Asian communities frustrated by the way Sikh, Muslim, Hindu, and Nepali Gurkha (Hindu and Buddhist) soldiers engaged the state and performed their political and religious identities as part of the British Indian army.Faithful Fighters is a powerful and brilliant meditation on the impossibility of modern colonial power to canonize religion and religious identity. The six chapters of this book examine a range of archives, themes, theaters, and actors including tensions surrounding the valorization of Sikh loyalty and controversies shadowing the Kirpān (sword), the cooptation of pan-Islamic sentiments for British imperialism, suspicions and sexual desires invested in the figure of the Pathan, Nepali Gurkhas, caste hierarchies, and rituals of purification, debates of food and religion in the military, projects of nationalism through military academies, and masculinity, fascism, and Hindu nationalism.This thoroughly researched and multidisciplinary book will attract and interest scholars from a range of fields including South Asian history, Religious Studies, Islamic Studies, Military History, and Cultural Studies. Beautifully written, and populated with enticing narratives and images, it will also be a delight to teach in a variety of classes.SherAli Tareen is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Franklin and Marshall College. His research focuses on Muslim intellectual traditions and debates in early modern and modern South Asia. His academic publications are available here. He can be reached at sherali.tareen@fandm.edu. Listener feedback is most welcome. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/islamic-studies

1hr 10mins

3 Apr 2020

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Kate Imy, "Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army" (Stanford UP, 2019)

New Books in Religion

In her fascinating and remarkable new book Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army (Stanford University Press, 2019), Kate Imy explores the negotiation of religious identity, military service, and imperial power in the context of twentieth century British India. How were preconceived British imperial notions of religion and loyalty to the state attached to indigenous South Asian communities frustrated by the way Sikh, Muslim, Hindu, and Nepali Gurkha (Hindu and Buddhist) soldiers engaged the state and performed their political and religious identities as part of the British Indian army.Faithful Fighters is a powerful and brilliant meditation on the impossibility of modern colonial power to canonize religion and religious identity. The six chapters of this book examine a range of archives, themes, theaters, and actors including tensions surrounding the valorization of Sikh loyalty and controversies shadowing the Kirpān (sword), the cooptation of pan-Islamic sentiments for British imperialism, suspicions and sexual desires invested in the figure of the Pathan, Nepali Gurkhas, caste hierarchies, and rituals of purification, debates of food and religion in the military, projects of nationalism through military academies, and masculinity, fascism, and Hindu nationalism.This thoroughly researched and multidisciplinary book will attract and interest scholars from a range of fields including South Asian history, Religious Studies, Islamic Studies, Military History, and Cultural Studies. Beautifully written, and populated with enticing narratives and images, it will also be a delight to teach in a variety of classes.SherAli Tareen is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Franklin and Marshall College. His research focuses on Muslim intellectual traditions and debates in early modern and modern South Asia. His academic publications are available here. He can be reached at sherali.tareen@fandm.edu. Listener feedback is most welcome. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

1hr 10mins

3 Apr 2020

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Kate Imy, "Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army" (Stanford UP, 2019)

New Books in Indian Religions

In her fascinating and remarkable new book Faithful Fighters: Identity and Power in the British Indian Army (Stanford University Press, 2019), Kate Imy explores the negotiation of religious identity, military service, and imperial power in the context of twentieth century British India. How were preconceived British imperial notions of religion and loyalty to the state attached to indigenous South Asian communities frustrated by the way Sikh, Muslim, Hindu, and Nepali Gurkha (Hindu and Buddhist) soldiers engaged the state and performed their political and religious identities as part of the British Indian army.Faithful Fighters is a powerful and brilliant meditation on the impossibility of modern colonial power to canonize religion and religious identity. The six chapters of this book examine a range of archives, themes, theaters, and actors including tensions surrounding the valorization of Sikh loyalty and controversies shadowing the Kirpān (sword), the cooptation of pan-Islamic sentiments for British imperialism, suspicions and sexual desires invested in the figure of the Pathan, Nepali Gurkhas, caste hierarchies, and rituals of purification, debates of food and religion in the military, projects of nationalism through military academies, and masculinity, fascism, and Hindu nationalism.This thoroughly researched and multidisciplinary book will attract and interest scholars from a range of fields including South Asian history, Religious Studies, Islamic Studies, Military History, and Cultural Studies. Beautifully written, and populated with enticing narratives and images, it will also be a delight to teach in a variety of classes.SherAli Tareen is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Franklin and Marshall College. His research focuses on Muslim intellectual traditions and debates in early modern and modern South Asia. His academic publications are available here. He can be reached at sherali.tareen@fandm.edu. Listener feedback is most welcome. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSupport our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/indian-religions

1hr 10mins

3 Apr 2020

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